ubuntu 9.10 & windows 7

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by carlos2009, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. carlos2009

    carlos2009 Senior Member

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    hi all

    i have windows 7 ultimate on the same drive i have ubuntu 9.10 (i recommend trying ubuntu) the only problem i have is when im using ubuntu i have access to my windows files but when im using windows i cant get into ubuntu
    is there any way around this?????

    p.s you can get ubuntu free
    Download Ubuntu | Ubuntu
     
  2. brianzion

    brianzion Senior Member

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    well my friend you can access the files they should be in windows 32 program files make sure you have admin rights to open
     
  3. rbmorse

    rbmorse New Member

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    The problem is that Windows does not come with a driver for the file system(s) used by Ubuntu (typically EXT3 or EXT4, but it can use others as well) and therefore cannot access the Ubuntu partition(s).

    I know there are ext3 drivers available for XP, but I don't recall seeing anything for EXT4 or ReiserFS4 that specifically works with Windows 7. You might try a Google using your Ubuntu file system and Windows and see if that turns up a driver.
     
  4. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    Whew where to start, first Welcome to the forums both carlos2009 and brianzion.
    Ok access from windows to ext2\ext3 partitions is not possible without help from third party apps.

    See the link below for alternatives.

    Three Ways To Access Linux Partitions (ext2/ext3) From Windows On Dual-Boot Systems | HowtoForge - Linux Howtos and Tutorials

    The three programs listed will work with Win 7 to allow you to access your Linux partitions.
    The third program listed "ext2 installable filesystem for windows" allows read\write access as well.
    The "ext2 installable filesystem for windows" will install with no problems in Win 7 by using compatibility mode for XP.

    It runs fine, I use it on my system.

    The other programs install with no need to resort to compatibility mode.
    Actually the first listed program "Explore2FS is standalone, no install needed.

    I've tried all these programs and they work for Ubuntu up to and including Ubuntu 8.04 LTS and all versions of PCLinuxOS up to at least PCLinuxOS 2009 (PCLinuxOS 2010 is in developement right now).

    The problem with later versions of Ubuntu including the version you are using is this.
    Although all these versions of Linux use the ext3 filesystem, Ubuntu, starting with Ubuntu 8.10 began using a version of ext3 that used 256 byte inodes instead of the previously default 128 byte inode size.

    None of the programs listed will work with Ubuntu 8.10 and beyond because of this situation.

    The program I use (Ext2 Installable FS) will assgn a drive letter OK but attempting to access the partition results in a message telling me that the partition is unformatted.

    There is a 4th option "Virtual Volumes" that is in beta that will work read only with your version of Ubuntu.
    It is beta and a little crude compared to the other alternatives but it will allow reading 256 byte inode ext3 file systems.

    chrysocome.net - Virtual Volumes
     
  5. carlos2009

    carlos2009 Senior Member

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    hey thats great advice and thankyou all very much
    carl
     
  6. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    Just finished testing "Virtual Volumes" on my Win 7 install and it works great, allowing me access READ ONLY to all my different Ubuntu partitions including
    the later versions using the nonstandard ext3 version like Ubuntu's after 8.04.

    You can access and open files as well as drag and drop copy them (no support for right clicking the file and choosing copy) to your desktop.

    Be aware that some files in Linux have either no file extension or an extension not recogniziable to Windows.
    Often a unrecognized file can be manually opened using a Windows app. Example most Linux text files can be opened using Wordpad.

    Not having write support isn't such a bad thing as it prevents the user from borking his linux install.

    Windows doesn't understand Linux permissions so changing files from Windows could render a Linux install unbootable at worst.
     

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