What is your favorite defrag program?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by Sakura, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. whoosh

    whoosh Cooler King
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    A good post RAK and very interesting indeed .
     
  2. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    I totally agree with Whoosh, excellent post!
     
  3. stueycaster

    stueycaster Millennium Celebration Award Winner
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    Thanks guys. I think W7 has been doing fine with keeping itself defragged. I'll just leave it the way it is.
     
  4. snakedoctor690

    snakedoctor690 New Member

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    useing smartdefrag from IObit just set it and forget it. Runs in the background
     
  5. dweezill

    dweezill New Member

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    I have always used the built in defrag (previous OS Vista as well as others) but, after reading this thread, maybe I should reconsider. After all, I am a newbie to all this technical info albeit an above average user.
     
  6. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Doesnt' matter. I recommend turning it off and just running a defrag manually about onece a month.
     
  7. pweegar

    pweegar New Member

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    It's not so much a matter of a defragger "packing everything tightly". It's a matter of a defragger placing all file segments togather, reducing the amount of read head travel the hd has to do. Fragmentation occurs when there are not enough continious blocks for a program to wite to. Once a particular block is filled, the next block is located and written to. Then you write again to the hd. The last block may not be filled, but can not be used. Find the next available space, write to it, move on, etc. It's a fun topic. You can get as many opimions as to whether or not defragging is good or bad. Some people say they have never defragged their drive. I say they either aren't doing very much with their pc or are just plane full of it.

    Ok, I'm done for now..LOL
     
  8. gunner308

    gunner308 New Member

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    I vote for Diskeeper Pro Premium. It's really good
     
  9. john3347

    john3347 Extraordinary Member
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    While I do not actually dispute any of the opinions expressed here, I do have some additional comment to add to some of them. First off, in my experience, the benefits of defragmentation is over emphasized by many. The theory is good, but in practice does not really hold true. I do not believe harddrive life expectancy is increased when a defrag requires a harddrive to run (in high gear) for 30 min to two hours and sometimes even longer in order to save a few milliseconds searching for file fragments. (Yes, the milliseconds add up, but never come close to equalling the time consumed by the defrag process) The total wear on harddrive components is much greater during the defrag process than in searching for fragments while opening files or applications. Kinda like spending a dollar to save a dime.

    It is my understanding that the hard drive searches (scans) the entire drive searching for fragments when it opens a file or application whether it finds any or not, (there is no "marker" to tell the harddrive that this file is complete or that this file has fragments in other sectors), thus there is no additional search time when drive is fragmented over when not fragmented. The additional time involved is read time and whatever time is required to assemble all the fragments. Is this operation not performed by the computer processor after all the fragments are read into RAM, therefore having no effect on harddrive run time? [Good case for matching harddrive size to harddrive needs. A 1TB harddrive to store 10 GB is wasting more than the difference in original purchase price]

    An occasional defrag will often speed up opening of some applications and some files, but the effect is less dramatic than some users perceive. A defrag every month or two - or 6 months - by whatever defrag mechanism is included with whatever OS one is running is sufficient for efficient computer operation.
     
  10. pweegar

    pweegar New Member

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    I would like to know what your basing your opinions on? I've been in IT for a long time (10+ years). I've seen what fragmentation can do. I've seen printers not print, due to the fact that the print driver/spooler where fragmented. I've seen programs not load because of time outs. I've also seen data not load because the drive couldn't find the data fast enough, etc.

    When does the entire hd get scanned???? The NTFS metadata for each file is stored in the MFT (Master File Table). It catalogs information for each file. 2 import parts are the EOF (End of File) marker and the valid data length (VDL). The EOF returns the actual file size, while the VDL identies the length of valid data on the drive. (From: 1.1 Glossary). Furthermore, the EOF is a non-human, non-printable character (ASCII 26).

    There is a lot of information from google explaining how and why fragmentation occurs. Also lots of info on how to reduce it. One thing of note I found concerns file downloading. If you download 2 (and I presume it also affects more than 2 files) NTFS will write each file to alternating clusters!!! Talk about automatic fragmentation!

    I also HIGHLY disagree with your last statement concerning defragging once ever 6 months is sufficient. It mainly depends on what your doing. Tell me that a 80 GB HD is fragmented when the user loads thousands (1k-100k pages) on a daily basis. Or millions of rows of a database get moved every day. Your hd WILL be fragmented and performance WILL decrease. Have seen it happen way to may times. (I'm a former IT person in a Corporate Records department where we scaneed millions of pages a year).
     
  11. john3347

    john3347 Extraordinary Member
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  12. pweegar

    pweegar New Member

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    I am also basing my post on experience. ANd yes, I remeber punch cards, having to register for classes using them way back when.

    Well, IF you had really read my post, I not only sited rows in a database, but also other uses. And this is from supporting hundreds of users over a number of years. I HAVE seen the results of fragmentation, both in the business world and my own computers, along with friends and family. It DOES occur, and DOES affect performance. Otherwise, why would Microsoft included a defragger in almost every OS since Win 95???? Because it's NEEDED, it IS the result of the behavior of the OS.
     
  13. electriclott

    electriclott New Member

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    I have been using the pinform defraggler for several years on my vista OS and loved it.....however after upgrading to 7 home premium i have noticed that it will stop short of 100 percent defragg. It leaves about 3 percent still fragmented. It says it is compatible, and i guess really it is not a major issue...just curios if anybody else has noticed something similar. Maybe its time I upgraded to a big boy defrag tool..lol
     
  14. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Auslogics defragger is similar and to avoid this I:
    First remove any system restore points.
    Run something like Ccleaner and lastly run the advanced disk clean found via the cmd prompt. To set up the advanced disk clean open command prompt and type:

    cleanmgr/sageset:1

    Then press enter. You'll now see a box similar to the disk clean one but with more boxes to tick. Tick all the boxes and click 'ok'.
    To set it running go back to the command prompt window and type:

    cleanmgr/sagerun:1

    Then press enter and your system will get a thorough clean. This will now run whenever you type this line in with no need to go through the set-up process again.
    Now run the defragger and you should see 100%

    Don't forget to create a new system restore point.
     
  15. Highwayman

    Highwayman Extraordinary Member

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    I've tried most of the main names for degraggers and I always come back to Auslogic's one eventually....so guess that's my pick, BTW great tip above there from Kemical
     
  16. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Agreed.. Auslogics for me is the best of the free defraggers out there..
     

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