Where Does Win7 Put Cookies?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by Ccolonbackslash, May 31, 2012.

  1. Ccolonbackslash

    Ccolonbackslash New Member

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    Where does Win7 put cookies? Are they all in one place, or are they in multiple locations?

    Thanks, C:\
     
  2. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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  3. alberto

    alberto New Member

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    Most cookies will be in some subfolder of %userprofile%\AppData\Roaming. Of course each application will store its own cookies in its own folder, but most should be there.
    Are you looking for anything specific?
     
  4. Ccolonbackslash

    Ccolonbackslash New Member

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    I just changed my IE settings to accept no cookies other than the ones that I specifically allow, and I wanted to see what snuck in there before I closed the door.

    Also, I did this on XP and still, even with supposedly complete manual control, there were occasionally sites that somehow managed to sneak in there. I would check every now and then and nuke the stuff I didn't recognize.
     
  5. Ccolonbackslash

    Ccolonbackslash New Member

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    I did a search (by date changed) and think I've found my cookies...

    C:\Users\%userprofile%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Cookies\Low

    Problem is though... When I try to dive in through Explorer, I can't find the directory. What switch do I need to throw in order to see everything? I've already turned on the obvious ones.

    I can get to here:

    C:\Users\bdw\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft

    but the "cookies" folder is non-existent?
     
  6. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    That would under, in Windows Explorer, Tools - Folder Options - View - "Hide Protected Operating System files" . But that is only for IE cookies.in Windows Explorer, Tools - Folder Options - View - "Hide Protected Operating System files" . But that is only for IE cookies. FF cookies are in C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\xxxt1n.default\, and in a compacted Dbase of sqlite.
     
  7. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    As Titanic said the easiest way to handle cookies is with CCleaner.
    It will show them all in a neat list and let you decide what to do with them.

    I keep the cookies for the places I want, like this forum, and it gets rid of the rest.

    Mike
     
  8. Ccolonbackslash

    Ccolonbackslash New Member

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    You see, that's exactly what has me stumped... I've already done exactly what you described above, and I've still got whole folders that just don't show up. :confused:

    Under Tools - Folder Options - View -
    I've hit the radio button that says "Show hidden files, folders, and drives"
    And I've un-checked the box that says "Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)

    And still I've got stuff that won't show?? I've got to be doing something wrong!!
     
  9. davehc

    davehc Microsoft MVP
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    With Mike's comment, and his reference to the suggestion to use Ccleaner, it seems the issue is that you want to see the cookies, not necessarily delete them? If that is the case, then, to echo your own words, you have me stumped also! But in your post #5, you stopped at Microsoft. Was there not a further sub folder "Windows"?
     
    #9 davehc, Jun 6, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
  10. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Even if you just want to see what cookies you have the easiest way is with CCleaner.

    Every time you get on line you pick up more of them so it really helps to just keep the ones that you need.
    I.e. places you log into a lot that require passwords etc. Every time I look there are twenty new ones.

    Mike
     
  11. Ccolonbackslash

    Ccolonbackslash New Member

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    Yes, I don't want to do anything fancy with the cookies which is why I'm resisting the use of a cookie manager. I have not yet reached the point of desperation that would spur me to buy something. I might, but not yet.

    As for why I stopped at the "windows" sub folder I thought the sub folder of interest was hidden. But... I just retried it and the sub-directories I couldn't find before are right there in front of me. I can only attribute my inability to see them before to simple pilot error. :redface:

    Mike and Titanic, Thanks also for the input on ccleaner. If I find I can't manage them directly, that will be where I head next.
     
  12. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    CCleaner is free, I'm guessing that there is almost no one on this forum who doesn't use it, (I don't know anyone who doesn't use it) it's been around since 2004. I think they are over 32,000,000 downloads.

    It gets updated regularly and will keep you computer free of junk, temp files, etc.
    I don't use the registry cleaner unless I've uninstalled something but then it gets rid of the left behind registry entries.
    Allow it to make a backup when you do the registry clean.

    It lets you change start-up items etc, risk free, if it doesn't work out all you have to do it recheck the item.

    You can chose exactly what it does, but the default settings work for me.

    If you just want to monitor what cookies you have you can do that.
    If you've never removed them you probably have a lot of them.

    Here's a review and a download link.

    CCleaner - CNET Download.com

    You will find Cookies under Options.

    Mike
     
  13. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    Altogether, cookies aren't that bad, in my opinion. They may spy on you a bit, like Orwell's 1984 Big Brother.

    Wikipedia:
    tracking cookies and especially third-party tracking cookies are commonly used as way to compile long-term records of individuals' browsing histories — a major privacy concern that has prompted European and US law makers to take action.
    Personally I say, what the heck? Like if the Secret Police wants to listen my phone calls - they'll probably just get bored. NOTHING TO RECORD! Billions of tons of information recorded every day, and what's the avail? Mankind uses all too much energy for pure nonsense - and counteractions.
     
  14. Ccolonbackslash

    Ccolonbackslash New Member

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    Thanks again guys. I've got ccleaner installed and have been poking around.

    I'm not all big brother is watching with the cookies. I picked up some malware in the past, and since then, I've tried my best to clamp down on things. I know that cookies aren't the problem, but it's just one more open door that I can close a little.
     

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