win8 signing in

nichos

Honorable Member
#1
This continuous signing in in win8 drives bonkers.

Any way to do away with it, I use the sleep a lot & each time have to sign in. .................nick
 


davidhk129

Senior Member
#2
This continuous signing in in win8 drives bonkers.

Any way to do away with it, I use the sleep a lot & each time have to sign in. .................nick

Have a look at this tutorial :
Log On User Account Automatically at Windows 8 Startup
http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2894-log-user-account-automatically-windows-8-startup.html
Skip step #4.
Use step #1,2,3 and 5.

Is that what you are looking for ?
 


#3
I would urge you not to use the option to automatically log in.

Early this year, I came home to find my home burglarized. Whoever that did this must have been in a hurry and just grabbed whatever he could from my home office. Took my i7 desktop, backup harddrives, galaxy tab 2, and a couple other things in there. I say they must have been in a hurry because the ipad and android tablets were still there on my bed in the bedroom.

Before that, never in a million years would I think something like that would happen to me. And I bet it never crossed your mind either.

Having to log in every time you turn on your machine seems like its inconvenient. But in the long run, it is for your own good and protection.

On a different note. One time I was a best buy browsing through the computers. I overheard one guy asking an associate there how he could log on to a laptop because he "forgot" the password. The associate asked him what operating system the machine ran, and he said he didn't remember. What brand was it? He didn't know either. The BB associate just said he didn't know and the guy should try geek squad. After he left, I said to the BB guy half chuckling "you thinking what I'm thinking?" and he replied "yeah, he probably stole it."
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#4
Good post. But, unfortunately, (imo) the desktop login is a domestic "in house" feature. If someone steals your computer, it is very easy to access your desktop. It is a taboo subject and I doubt it can be discussed on this forum.
 


#5
Good post. But, unfortunately, (imo) the desktop login is a domestic "in house" feature. If someone steals your computer, it is very easy to access your desktop. It is a taboo subject and I doubt it can be discussed on this forum.
I know it's easy to access your computer. I don't care what kind of security you put in place. I'll break right through it.

Does this mean we should never try to be more secure? You can just grab something and walk right out a walmart. And walmart associates are not suppose to confront you if you do this. Does this mean they should not bother at all to put someone at the front door as a deterrent?

The fact of the matter is there are some things on my hard drive that I want to remain private. Whoever that steals my computer is a lot more likely to simply wipe everything to reinstall the OS if there's a log-on password in place. If it automatically logs on, then they can just simply go in and browse through your contents.

Remember that you cannot control whether the computer will get stolen or not. But you can make it harder for them to access your contents. Chances are whoever the burglar is will know little more than reinstall the OS. If they had more skills, then they'd be working somewhere instead of breaking into homes.
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#6
I do think you are agreeing with my post?
"there are some things on my hard drive that I want to remain private"

Agreed, but it may depend on what one regards as private. If my family choose to look at my "private" material, it matters little to me. Other things, such as bank and other security items, all require further log in knowledge, so it is not an issue (for me).

" Chances are whoever the burglar is will know little more than reinstall the OS"

Chances are, also, he will.

I am not disagreeing with your post, simply stating an alternative view. If a computer owner feels that he has sensitive data on the machine, it is always a better option to make it difficult in anyway possible. Maybe digressing a little for the thread, but you will find quite a few posts on the web, deploring Ms tightened security in Windows 8. - that's life!

In my case, having a low budget, my best security, (absurdly) would be heavy insurance or keeping the computer under lock and key when I am out. -I could not possibly afford a new computer out of my own pocket.
 


#7
I guess we're agreeing with each other in different words.
 


nichos

Honorable Member
#8
I followed David's info "....http://www.eightforums.com/tutorial...nt-automatically-windows-8-startup.html....." but whichever way I tried it I still have to sign in every time.

To be quite honest in reading it makes no sense.

Anybody else with ideas ho to stop signing in? .....thanx .....nick
 


nichos

Honorable Member
#9
Is some while when I asked this & the posts might be outdated by now so am asking anew.

I followed David's info "....http://www.eightforums.com/tutorial...nt-automatically-windows-8-startup.html....." but whichever way I tried it I still have to sign in every time.

To be quite honest in reading it makes no sense.

Anybody else with ideas how to stop signing in? .....thanx .....nick
 


#10
I followed David's info "....http://www.eightforums.com/tutorial...nt-automatically-windows-8-startup.html....." but whichever way I tried it I still have to sign in every time.

To be quite honest in reading it makes no sense.

Anybody else with ideas ho to stop signing in? .....thanx .....nick
In most cases, whenever it is possible, I would not post a suggestion to solve a problem unless I had tried it on my computer first.
I did try the tutorial on mine, and it worked.

I don't know why it does not work for you.
Silly as this question may sound, did you click OK on step #5?
 


Last edited:

davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#11
The tutorial works perfectly. I have used it many times.

But, if you are having difficulty, try this instead:
Open a command prompt(Run as Administrator).
Type the following command and enter.
net user administrator /active
A prompt will appear that you have been succesful.

Reboot and see if it is now OK.
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#12
Can you explain what you are talking about.
That link you provided goes to the root of the forum and not to any specific thread, post, or tutorial.
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#14
OK, thanks Dave.
I guess you guys have it under control. I was just wondering when he has to log in and actually to what, as the OP above wasn't exactly clear and I couldn't get to the Tutorial with his link.

Wondering now if he has his screen saver setting checked to prompt for login?
 


nichos

Honorable Member
#15
My apologies, how did that crept in?, HE meant this one below to stop the infernal signing in. So far managed to avoid singing in on first startup, but not when coming out of sleep that we use a lot during the day, ..................nick

http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2894-log-user-account-automatically-windows-8-startup.html
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#16
Go here
Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Power Options
Click the link that says "Change plan settings" adjacent to the plan you are currently using
On the next page click the link that says "Change advanced power settings"
In the dialog box that is presented after that click there should be a link at the top that says "Change settings that are currently unavailable"
Click that
Then change yes to no under "Require a password on wakeup"
And double check your screen saver setting as well and make sure that is not set to prompt for password upon resume.
 


nichos

Honorable Member
#17
OK, thank you all for an amazing response.

After a few tries, confusing the procedure as it is, It worked but only on startup.

Then on helpful suggestions I went to CTRL Panel>Power Options & where it says "require signing to wake up" I clicked on "not sign in on wake up" & it worked just now on wake up. .....cheers ..................nick
 


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