How to revert back to Windows 7

#1
I am considering the purchase of the Windows 8 Pro upgrade for $39.99. I would install it on my Dell laptop running Windows 7. If after using Windows 8 for awhile, I may decide I like Windows 7 better. How is it possible to revert back? I read that once you do an upgrade the license of the older OS is lost according to this reference:

which is quoted here:
"If I use a Windows 8 Upgrade disc/download to upgrade my Windows 7 computer to Windows 8, can I then use my old Windows 7 disc and product key to install Windows 7 on another computer?"

No. The Windows 8 Upgrade license replaces the previous Windows 7 (or Windows Vista or Windows XP) license.
To be clear: your old version of Windows that you upgraded from can no longer be used on your current, or any other, computer.
Is this really true? If so, it sure doesn't seem to be widely publicized.
Pete
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#2
There are many different opinions and guesses about how some things work. The EULA says you cannot continue to use the Sacrifical OS after it has been used to install an Upgrade OS. That part is fairly easy to understand. So it follows, if you stop using the Upgrade, you are allowed to start using the Sacrifical OS again. And I don't mean switching back and forth, but a permanent install.

I have read, the old License key is not deactivated, so you should be able to reactivate Windows 7 using the prior key. If you have problems, a call to Microsoft should allow for reverting back to the prior OS.

But I have no official documents or instructions giving specific guidance.
 


Medico

Senior Member
#3
If you create an Image of Win 7 before starting the Win 8 Installation, then reverting to Win 7 is easy. It takes about 10 minutes to restore from an Image.

I use Acronis True Image 2013 and can easily revert to an earlier OS.

Legally if you remove the Win 8 installation you can then start using the Win 7 OS again. But you can then not use Win 8 unless you replace a different qualifying OS.

With some customizations you can use Win 8 very similarly to Win 7 with some added benefits that come with Win 8. I have added a tutorial here that will go a long ways toward making Win 8 feel more familiar.
 


#4
There are many different opinions and guesses about how some things work. The EULA says you cannot continue to use the Sacrifical OS after it has been used to install an Upgrade OS. That part is fairly easy to understand. So it follows, if you stop using the Upgrade, you are allowed to start using the Sacrifical OS again. And I don't mean switching back and forth, but a permanent install.

I have read, the old License key is not deactivated, so you should be able to reactivate Windows 7 using the prior key. If you have problems, a call to Microsoft should allow for reverting back to the prior OS.

But I have no official documents or instructions giving specific guidance.
Thanks. What you say seems logical and makes sense. I'll assume that I can revert back and if worse comes to worse, call Microsoft
Pete
 


#5
If you create an Image of Win 7 before starting the Win 8 Installation, then reverting to Win 7 is easy. It takes about 10 minutes to restore from an Image.

I use Acronis True Image 2013 and can easily revert to an earlier OS.

Legally if you remove the Win 8 installation you can then start using the Win 7 OS again. But you can then not use Win 8 unless you replace a different qualifying OS.

With some customizations you can use Win 8 very similarly to Win 7 with some added benefits that come with Win 8. I have added a tutorial here that will go a long ways toward making Win 8 feel more familiar.
Thanks. I've used Acronis True Image for years, but simply restoring from an Acronis backup does not keep you activated if Microsoft has invalidated it as part of the upgrade process. I believe that on the occasion of each Windows Update Microsoft verifies your license.

Great tutorial. Thanks, I've bookmarked it.
Pete
 


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#7
That may be so, but if so a simple phone call to MS will allow activation. Perhaps this MS site will help.
Yes, very true. This did happen to me once. I kept getting messages that my license was not genuine. I finally had to call MS to fix.

Thanks Saltgrass and Medicted60 for your feedback. I'm satisfied that I can revert back to Windows 7 without problems if the need arises. Based upon what I've been reading about Windows 8 this would seem to be likely (although in fairness I intend to give it a week) :tickled_pink:
Pete
 


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