Moving my OS C: drive to a new motherboard?

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#1
So I got a new gigabyte motherboard new ram and a new cpu and I want to move my C: drive to the new motherboard, will this work? Will I just be able to detach my HDD from my current foxconn motherboard and plug it into my new gigabyte mobo? Are their complications and/or steps i have to take to make sure it's done correctly? or am I screwed and have to just do a fresh install?
 


#2
Hi.

What you want to do is clean install Windows. New motherboard means different drivers and other settings. It pretty much goes without exception that clean install is needed. That being said, it is not impossible to use the old install. It just really should not be done ever.

Hope this helps.
 


#3
idk if you guys need this info but this is the new hardware..

DDR2 -> DDR3
Phenom 9850 - > Phenom II x6
The hard drive with my OS and all the installed programs is a 500gb wd cavier black
 


#4
Hi.

What you want to do is clean install Windows. New motherboard means different drivers and other settings. It pretty much goes without exception that clean install is needed. That being said, it is not impossible to use the old install. It just really should not be done ever.

Hope this helps.

lol thanks, that pretty much settles it :)
 


bassfisher6522

Essential Member
#5
Yes you can and with out any ill effects. The key is installing your mobo drivers from the cd/dvd that you get with the new mobo. Once that is done your system will fire right up. I've done it plenty of times. Like TorrentG stated.....the norm is a clean install.
 


Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#6
Whoa! Wait a minute here! While this is technically possible, it most likely is illegal! A new motherboard, new RAM and new CPU equals a new computer! And according the EULAs (end-user license agreements) for almost ALL software, including operating systems, using the software on a new computer requires a new license! That is, you must buy a new copy of Windows to use it legally on this new computer. Not doing so is stealing and that would make you a thief, subject to a substantial fines and possible jail time for each EULA violation!

The ONLY exception is if you are using a full "retail", boxed copy of Windows you purchased separately at a retail store, or directly from Microsoft.

If that copy of Windows currently on that C drive (1) came with the old computer, (2) is an OEM version you purchased for that computer, or (3) is an Upgrade version you purchased for that computer, then using it in ANY other computer is illegal! Period! Don't do it! Buy a new license of Windows for this new computer, or use one of the many available free versions of Linux.

As noted, this is an industry wide policy for all software, not just Windows or Microsoft products. If you have other purchased software installed on that C drive, you may need to buy new licenses for your new computer. It is immaterial that you are using the same case, power supply, drives, monitor, etc. And technically, the CPU and RAM don't matter either. The new motherboard is the determining factor.
 


#7
Thanks Digerati, I was under a different assumption that you could as long as it stayed in your possession. My apologies to the OP, and this forum for my mistaken assumption of the facts. This want happen again.
 


Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#8
No problem. This is an often misunderstood issue. And frankly, Microsoft and other software makers have done a lousy job of making it clear. It must be understood that we don't own the software, we own a license to use it. And we agree to the terms of the license when we install it.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#9
The only version you cannot move to a new computer is the OEM version. Telephone reactivation will probably be required if not reinstalling.
 


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Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#10
The only version you cannot move to a new computer is the OEM version.
That is not true. If you have an upgrade version, it is tied to the original "qualifying" license. And if that is not a retail version, you cannot move the upgrade either.

And in any case, you cannot install any of them on more than one computer at a time - unless they specifically say they are volume licenses. But those are mostly seen in the corporate world, though there were some 3 packs sold.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#11
Since I have moved an upgrade version from a desktop to a laptop, I will have to disagree with you.....

Tell me where in the EULA is says something other than it can be installed and used on one computer, except for the OEM version (I am not referring to any other business type versions)
 


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Digerati

Fantastic Member
Microsoft MVP
#12
As I said in my opening post, you may technically be able to do it, that does not make it legal. You can run a stop sign and probably get away with it, but that is not legal either. And I am not going to side track this thread on further discussion about it either. You read the EULA. You can find yours here. They all say something similar to the one for Win7 Professional where it says,
The software license is permanently assigned to the computer with which the software is distributed. That computer is the “licensed computer.”
 


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