PC turns off without warning

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by Endorphyn, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    BTW, I am NOT trying to give you a hard time here. I am just trying to point out that there are just so many variables involved with random shutdowns, reboots and freezes. I note there are an estimated 1.4 Billion Windows computers out there and virtually every single one becomes unique within the first couple minutes it is booted the very first time. The new user creates profiles, sets up their security, configures their networks, email, productivity and entertainment software. They configure and customize their Desktops to their liking, they add their own peripherals such as keyboards, printers, monitors, external drives and other USB devices, and so much more.

    I've been doing computer repairs for many years and if I hadn't seen over and over and over again, the "exact same problem" ending up NOT being the same problem at all, I would not be so adamant here.

    So again, I appreciate your position, and I totally understand your frustration in wanting to resolve your problem too. And for sure, I recommend you open a new thread and maybe your problem can be resolved too.
     
  2. CopperMich

    CopperMich New Member

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    Ok, i will make a different thread.
    I know you only want to help.
    Thanks again, and indeed every pc is different even with the same hardware.
     
  3. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Thanks for your understanding.
     
  4. VsUK

    VsUK Senior Member

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    Can I just mention something that might be a factor for this problem. I live in a old house & in the area our lights dim randomly for a split second during the day. This is a power fluctuation & I have a 600W 80 Plus Silver & every time my lights used to dim my system would instantly lose power & restart about surge detection. Well the motherboard BIOS needed updating that stated should of fixed this problem but it didn't for me. I disabled the feature & have been using it perfectly fine for the last year & half now without a single fault!
     
  5. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    The BIOS has nothing to do with the PSU dropping power.
     
  6. VsUK

    VsUK Senior Member

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    My bois setting had Anti Surge enabled & every time my power had a little fluctuation the system powered off to protect itself even though it was perfectly safe to remain on. So yes, BIOS can make you're system power off just like it make's your system power off when you're CPU reaches a specific temp. Disable anti surge & if it still happens then you have ruled it out but it fixed my problem nearly 2 year's ago & I'm still using the same setup!
     
  7. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Okay I understand what you are saying now, but that is still NOT a BIOS function. That is an integrated motherboard feature with settings that can be controlled through the BIOS Setup Menu. It is the same as the motherboard's integrated sound card, or graphics card, or integrated network interface - "motherboard" (not BIOS) features that can be controlled via the BIOS Setup Menu. If the sound is garbled, it is not the BIOS causing it. Same with this motherboard feature.

    If this "motherboard feature" is seeing a surge big enough to trigger the board's (not BIOS, but board) surge protection, that means the power supply is failing to regulate its output voltages and the motherboard's Surge Protection is doing it's job by signaling the motherboard's chipset to signal the PSU to shutdown.

    This could indicate a failing or faulty PSU (and even the best can and do fail - and will fail, eventually). Or it could indicate really dirty power through the mains. An old house really has nothing to do with it (my house is almost 60 years old) - assuming the outlets are not damaged and still wired properly. The problem is either anomalies coming off the grid (my problem - I live in Tornado Alley) or you have a very power hungry appliance (like a big window AC or old refrigerator) on the same circuit sending anomalies down your line your PSU cannot compensate for. What you really need (and what EVERY computer needs) is to run your computer off a "good" UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation).

    By you disabling the Surge Protection in your BIOS, you are doing the same as by-passing a fuse, or removing the safety from a gun. Not a good idea.

    So I recommend you shop around for a "good" UPS with AVR. I use the APC BR1500 VA UPS to protect my i7, 16Gb, GTX-650Ti PC, two 22" widescreen monitors, plus my cable modem, wireless router, and 4-port switch. Like power supplies, you want to avoid cheap UPSs. The better ones have good "sinewave approximation" or "pure sinewave" outputs and the better ones have very fast "cutover" times. Note the ATX standard require ATX compliant PSUs maintain output (voltage "hold-up" time) for just a mere 17 milliseconds. A 17ms power "dip" is much faster than the human eye can detect. If you are seeing your lights dim or flicker, those are long duration sags no PSU is expected to regulate for.

    Note a surge and spike protector is little more than a fancy and expensive extension cord that kills power during excessive surges and spikes and does absolutely nothing for dips (opposite of spikes) or sags (opposite of surges) or brownouts (extended sags).

    So I recommend you get a "good" UPS with AVR and re-enable your motherboard's surge protection. And also, I recommend every computer user and household (especially brand new and older homes) have access to a AC Outlet Tester to ensure your wall outlets are properly wired and grounded. I recommend one with a GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupt) indicator as it can be used to test bathroom and kitchen outlets too. These testers can be found for your type and voltage outlet, foreign or domestic, at most home improvement stores, or even the electrical department at Walmart.

    Note until right now, I have not said anything about full power outages. That's because the primary advantage of a "good" UPS with AVR is the AVR - the automatic voltage regulate that compensates for those unwanted, and potentially dangerous surges, spikes, dips and sags. Backup power during a blackout is just the icing on the cake.

    Oh, and if you have an expensive big screen TV and/or home theater audio system, best to get a "good" UPS with AVR for that too.
     

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