Re-installing Win 7 Pro Problem

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Installation' started by quicksun, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. quicksun

    quicksun New Member

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    Hi,
    I want to re-install Windows 7 Pro on my computer because my OS has become corrupted. I purchased one of the first Windows7 disk from MS several years ago and when I tried to re-install Windows, I got a message "Current version of Windows is more current than the version you are trying to upgrade to", and the re-install stopped. I know my disk version is out of date and my computer version has been upgraded over the years and is newer, but why can't I install my disk version and then download all the patches etc to bring my OS up to snuff? Is there any solution that will allow me to re-install my OS. I don't want to do a custom install and wipe out all my programs and data that I have on my C drive.
    Thanks,
    quicksun
     
  2. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    If, as you say, your reinstall is because of corruption on your current op sys installation then I would strongly recommend a clean install after a reformat. A reinstall over the existing system is most certain to lead to importing of unwanted baggage.

    I have always also strongly advocated that the system drive should be reserved for system and applications software only and that all user data, downloads etc should be stored on a separate drive to avoid this very problem amongst other reasons.
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
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    You are getting the message because you have Service Pack 1 and all of the Windows Updates installed. You don't want to install over the OS - it will slow down everything and there's no way to know if it will resolve anything. Like pat says, it will compound the problem. I would strongly consider using Acronis to back up your entire disk, or Windows Backup, and perform a clean install.

    If you have no place to back up anything, Acronis allows you to use the same disk as a safe zone for storage. Additionally, if you still want to protect your files and documents (not program files, as those will likely go), I would strongly recommend a cloud storage solution like Google Drive, Windows Live SkyDrive, or Dropbox.
     
  4. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
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  5. quicksun

    quicksun New Member

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    This reply pertains to all the input that was given to my question. First off, thanks for the advice.

    I agree that formatting my hard drive is the best way to go, but I have a massive Outlook email address list and my past experience with formatting my hard drive has been a nightmare trying to recreate my address book again. Microsoft does not make it easy to save that file for later re-use. I have always used Genie-Soft to back up my drive and although it is supposed to save my email list and re-install it again, it never works. Is there a fool proof way to save my email mailing list and easily install it again in Outlook? This is a very big deal for me.

    In addition, if I do a Windows Custom install, that replaces all my programs which appears to me to be the same thing as formatting my hard drive. Is this true, or should I format my hard drive and then install my operating system? Is a quick format as good as a long detailed one?

    Thanks,
    quicksun
     
  6. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
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    First, your Outlook data. This is contained in a file with an extension of .pst, and you can find where it is stored by right clicking on your email address in the folders tree in Outlook, selecting data file properties then advanced. This will show you where the file is located and you can simply make a copy of it to some external storage. After reinstalling Outlook you can replace the blank pst file created with a copy of your original one.

    A custom install will allow you to select certain installation features including any applications integrated with Windows. It will not, of course reinstall any applications which you installed yourself after installing Windows. A quick format will effectively set your drive up as completely blank but does so by just overwriting all directory entries. The main difference between that and a full format is that it will not actually write to any data sectors which should not be important to you unless you suspect any problems with the drive. The whole process of reinstalling Windows, reconfiguring and installing your apps is probably going to take a few hours and the little extra time involved in doing a full format wil probably make the additional checks which it carries out worth doing.
     
  7. quicksun

    quicksun New Member

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    Thanks Pat,

    I know that the Outlook data file is a .pst file, but it isn't easy to just add that file into a fresh Outlook install folder and have it read...at least that is my experience in the past. I guess I'll do a reformat this evening and start over.

    Thanks,
    quicksun
     

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