What is my best option

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by Mike6080919395, Nov 4, 2009.

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  1. Mike6080919395

    Mike6080919395 New Member

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    My concern:
    If I completely re-install windows vista 64-bit via format, then apply a windows 7 home premium upgrade.
    Will it be corrupted due to two different operating systems being installed to complete the windows 7 package


    If I paid $199.00 for a full version and installed it then I am guaranteed to have clean uncorrupted files, not mixed vista and windows 7 files.

    Maybe my thinking is off, but isn't it safer to go full version just to avoid unknown or unforseen software conflicts that will occur later on due to having vista installed first.

    I'd like to save $$$ by choosing the $119.00 option, but again I am worried about corruption and future conflicts by going the upgrade route vs the full version route.

    Please offer more incite on how the upgrade works, because I think mixing vista first then windows 7 next is a disaster waiting to show future conflicts.
     
  2. patrickt

    patrickt Honorable Member

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    I believe when you install using the upgrade disk you are given an option of installing over the existing OS, which I think is unwise, or an option of formating the partition and doing a clean install, my preferred option.
     
  3. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    You can fix the upgrade version to install clean ...or download the full version from Microsft... links on my last blog...
    then to use your Upgrade key. When installing select the version that matches your key and do a clean install. Make sure you data is backed because the drive will be cleaned.
     
  4. sanddunes21

    sanddunes21 New Member

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    I've never had good luck overwriting existing partitions. I'd reformat and do a clean install.
     
  5. wsemerald

    wsemerald New Member

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    full clean up your OS, remove unnecessary programs, defrag disks by a professional registry cleaner or registry optimizer
     
  6. intwtl

    intwtl New Member

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    If you are worried about losing data and unsure about the upgrade just buy another hd and install the upgrade as a clean install.

    You can then move your data over once you are satisfied with the system.

    You then have a hd with the last os if you want to go back or you can clone the new os to it once your files etc are copied to the new hd.

    It's a no worry solution.

    Good luck
     
  7. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    I agree with the others about a "clean" install.

    However, you will need to re-install all your 3rd party applications.

    I think the second hard drive is an excellent idea. I always run two drives on my machines.
     
  8. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Excellent advice.. I couldn't have said it any better myself !
     
  9. This violates the license. When Microsoft publishes a detector for it -- and they will -- you won't pass WGA tests. That means that you won't get updates.

    tbouunt's advice will cause you problems. I recommend not following his suggestions.
     
  10. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Can you be specific and give me a chance to explain more clearly?
     
  11. Are you implying that didn't read the End User License Agreement before you started altering the licensed product that you received? Tsk-tsk-tsk.

    When you alter an installation file covered by the license for the product in order to use it in ways not intended by the licensor, you are creating a counterfeit product. Whether or not the licensor, in this case Microsoft, is morally right or wrong in limiting the functionality of their product (a foolish argument on which I will not waste my time), the judge will still order you to pay the fine for the crime and damages to the licensor.

    If you really need the installation media for multiple version of Windows, then you can do what the professionals do: buy the proper licenses and media. Just because you're an amateur doesn't mean you get to break the law.
     
  12. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Ok I see what you are getting at. I never made that argument. Some thing have changed that you are evidently not aware of. I'll explain. After the upgrade came out and thousands and thousands of people were calling Microsoft with the problems the upgrading was causing, MICROSOFT released a utility (week before last) to make it possible/easy for anyone having upgrade problems to use the UPGRADE to do a full install.... and they ENCOURAGED people to use their free utility. Obviously a lot of people don't know that because even a learned person like yourself who does know how to solve a lot of problems isn't aware of this solution. I suppose I could include you as one more person I have helped now that you understand. But if you had studied my blogs your knowledge would be current.


    May I ask why you seem to be so concerned about this? I don't think this is the first time you've displayed annoyance with me personally. I really don't pay much attention to anyone here unless they mention my name. I focus on the content of the message and offer a suggestion, which is only my point of view. I hope that doesn't bother you in any personal way.
     
  13. You advocated that people "delete ei.cfg and burn to disk", which creates an installation configuration not distributed or licensed by Microsoft in order to perform an installation procedure that is not recommended by Microsoft. No where in their documentation do they recommend the procedure of modifying or reverse-engineering their installation media, as so many people have done, which clearly violates the license agreement.

    Here is the actual method that Microsoft recommends for performing a "clean" installation (more properly known as a "custom" installation) of Windows 7:See the link on that page for perfoming a custom installation.


    Section 8 (Scope of License) of the Windows 7 EULA says specifically that YOU MAY NOT
    • work around any technical limitations in the software;
    • reverse engineer, decompile or disassemble the software, except and only to the extent that applicable law expressly permits, despite this limitation;
    The procedure that you advocate does both.

    In addition, as it regards creating new media, the EULA says,
    "If you acquired the software on a disc or other media, you may make one backup copy of the media. You may use it only to reinstall the software on the licensed computer."
    Please note that it does not say that you can use unofficial means to alter the copy that you make (slipstreaming, for instance, is allowed as a recommended Microsoft procedure elsewhere on their site).

    See the EULA for any Microsoft product at:
    Yes. The "free utilities" that they recommend are the "Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor" and the "Easy Transfer Utility" for various upgrade scenarios. No where do they provide a utility that deletes the ei.cfg file or burns a new installation medium, which is the procedure that you advocate.

    I am concerned because you are recommending a procedure that violates the Microsoft EULA to end-users who already have enough problems. Why would I NOT be concerned about that? I'm sure that you mean to be helpful, and I bear no ill will against you. But unless I see it in writing from Microsoft that they won't send their lawyers after someone who follows your procedure, which so clearly violates the EULA, then I have to warn people against doing what you recommend.

    However, if you have a link to a page at Microsoft where they say it's okay to delete the ei.cfg file and then burn a new disc, then I'll eat my words.
     
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