Windows 7 Compatibility Help Needed

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by Canaussie, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. Canaussie

    Canaussie New Member

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    G'day,

    We have an older application that we distribute to clients with the advice they should run it in Windows XP SP3 Compatibility Mode when using Windows 7.

    As of late, we have had clients say that running the software in this mode means having to enter a Admin password. As a test, we had them switch to Windows 7 Compatibility mode which solves everything...they are not prompted for a password and the software runs fine.

    With other clients, Windows XP SP3 Compatibility Mode works well without any issues or password prompts.

    Questions...
    1. Why would this older software run well in Windows 7 Compatibility mode but not when this is unticked and why is a password requested for some when running in Windows XP SP3 Compatibility Mode?
    2. Why am I seeing different results with different clients?

    Slowly going insane...

    Canaussie
     
  2. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    G'day mate! Just thinking out loud, but does this occur to all your clients while running all versions of Windows7; for example, Win7 PRO x64, Win7 x32, Win7 Ultimate x64, Win7 Business x32, Win7 Business x64?? :brew:

    BIGBEARJEDI
     
  3. Canaussie

    Canaussie New Member

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    Thanks for your question but I am sorry to say we haven't tracked what version of Windows 7 our clients are using. They are worldwide and I would say there is a mixture of versions. Are you thinking that it is the version difference that is dictating the mixed results?

    I can say that some clients are on computers that are more locked down if you know what I mean. Corporate situations where IT is on top of privileges and then there are some clients who have Admin privileges.

    We do know that 64 bit versions of Win 7 are becoming more of the norm in our circles. Our application is 32 bit.
     
  4. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    That sounds promising, since I've been fast going insane...

    Seeing different results is quite normal. Computers work "personally", and I don't really think there is a definite answer to that. If it works well with Windows 7 Compatibility, why not use it? Don't want to sound indifferent, but is there a must to get it to work with XP SP3?
     
  5. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Canaussie:
    That's exactly what I'm saying! And since you are not tracking your Client computers' version of Windows they are using, that's definitely a problem. Not to mention that some users have Admin priveleges and some don't. That's what we call "an uncontolled environment" in the IT biz. Since you don't have computers that can be controlled by you, Users can make changes to your programs and their OS environment without your knowledge or permission. That in turn can cause problems in program compatability across an enterprise. Since your Clients are not part of your Company, you have no control over what they do with your application, or how they install it other than a recommendation for minimum system requirements in a Readme file packaged with your distribution cd or download file. In an Enterprise situation, companies will lock down priveleges for all Users, and have the installation tightly controlled or embedded through image installs.

    It sounds like that "older application" isn't going to be re-written for XP anytime soon, and since Microsoft is ending all support for XP in 2014; you will be distributing an application you are trying to support for your Clients on a dead-OS!!

    Titanic is right on the money with his comment. Either force your clients to run 1 single version of Windows7 that works w/out having to enter a password for compatabilty mode, or scrap the application and replace with something newer that is designed to run in the new 64 bit OS environment.

    BBJ
     
  6. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    I'm just curious as to what software this is that you distribute? Is there an update version of the software?
     
  7. Canaussie

    Canaussie New Member

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    Thank you all for your suggestions. It is an inhouse VB6 application and we are actively working on its .Net equivalent but I wouldn't expect a rollout of that for 2 years so we have to battle for a while yet.

    Another question...why is Windows 7 a choice in the Windows 7 compatibility list?
     
  8. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    I've always wondered that myself?
     
  9. Joe S

    Joe S Excellent Member

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    Maybe it's there to switch back to the default.
    Joe
     
  10. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    A fast study gave two answers,
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/antivirus-partners/windows-7.aspx
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/understanding-hardware-and-software-for-64-bit-windows

    If my picture is the right, it has to do with the 32bit vs. 64bit. You have something running with 64, something with 32, so it would be pretty much like Joe S notes, kind of switching to the default = normalizing system / programs to a level that suits all. Microsoft has apparently (?) put this compatibility mode there in order to give the system a possibility to function well.

    Not sure, though. :rolleyes:

    But anyway, like Bigbearjedi writes, XP is definitely dead in April 8, 2014, according to Microsoft, so you need to work it out. Best wishes.
     

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