8.1 confirmed for August

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#1
According to an article by Zdnet Journo Mary Jo Foley Microsoft Has confimed that August will see the release of RTM 8.1. Some thought it would be around August first but it looks like this date has been pushed back:

Microsoft confirms Windows 8.1 to RTM by August

Microsoft will deliver Windows 8.1, codenamed "Blue" to OEMs in late August 2013, company officials said on July 8.
So it looks like Windows 8.1 is going to be released to manufacturing by August, after all, as tipsters have been saying since the Blue codename first leaked almost a year ago.
Microsoft delivered a public preview of Windows 8.1 on June 26during its Build conference. There are no more preview/test builds scheduled. The next stop is RTM.
Microsoft will make Windows 8.1 available to all Windows 8 and Windows RT users as a free upgrade through the Windows Store.
Reference:

Microsoft confirms Windows 8.1 to RTM by August | ZDNet
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#2
I do love a juicy rumor, so in the interest of continuing such rumors and with a bit of careless disregard for the risk of propagating any and all mis-information...... It looks like August 16th may be the target date.
Read more here
Parsed evidently through some Russian website source, so as with all rumors..... apply grains of salt as needed.
But in any event the wait should soon be over, and yet another excellent excuse for a clean install.
 


#3
I may also do a clean install when it comes out - that along side some much needed laptop cleaning.

I haven't used the preview, but I'll upgrade to 8.1 as soon as it's officially released.
 


#4
Don't know why people want to upgrade rather than clean install. Upgrade will always give you problems down the road.
 


#5
Based on what evidence? I don't do a clean install every time a new service pack comes out, or for that matter when a normal windows upgrade comes out.
 


Ralph Bromley

Honorable Member
#6
Well considering how the preview is I would bet it would be soon.
If 8.1 really is just a slightly juiced up version of 8 it wont be that long.
I mean why put effort into something right, seems to be the Microsoft mindset of ignoring consumers and doing whatever the flippin heck they want.
Yeah stay the course Microsoft, good jorb!
 


#7
Based on what evidence? I don't do a clean install every time a new service pack comes out, or for that matter when a normal windows upgrade comes out.
Haha, based on what evidence?

Try to think of it this way. Do you swim? I happen to be a swimmer. I swim like a fish, actually. One thing I've always noticed with beginner swimmers is they always try to swim with their fingers completely spread. My advice to them is always "don't spread your fingers!". Now, imagine someone coming along and asking "what evidence do you have that swimming with fingers together is better than swimming with fingers all spread out?"

I would only stare at them, blink once, and then ask "I did not just hear that did I?"

No, I don't have any scientific study to reference. But anyone who knows how to swim will tell you that it's common sense to close the gaps between the fingers. They don't build paddles with holes. And people don't use nets to paddle their canoes.

Upgrades are more convenient, yes. But based on my years of working in IT as well as the collective advice of all IT departments out there, it is always better to do a clean install than an upgrade.

When programmers put together an upgrade for an OS, they couldn't account for everything that the individual user has done to his device. Data from the old OS might not work well with the new OS. Left-over cache files might wreak havoc on the new system. In the industry, we call them gremlins. Even something as simple as a temporary file could turn into a long-term problem for the new upgraded OS. Left-over kernel codes could wreak havoc on driver files. There are a myriad of things that could happen.

For example, in one of my PCs, I was lazy and so I upgraded from 7 to 8. Everything seemed fine at first. But 5 months in, my tiles started disappearing. I tried everything I could think of to solve this bug. Posted questions everywhere and worked with windows 8 experts. Nothing. I finally gave up and did a clean install.

With upgrades, it's a hit or miss. And problems may not show themselves until months later, when you already have tons of things installed and everything customized to your likings.

Just do yourself a favor and do a clean install at the beginning.
 


kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#8
Very much agreed.. Upgrades are the bane of forums everywhere.. We have seen the same thing whichever os is used and a clean install is always the best way of starting out with a new operating system.
 


#9
this is an eye opener suggestion for me as i was also with the thought that upgrade is the simple and better option to improve the functionality but now i got the real fact behind why not to go for it ..
 


#10
This is beta version..when releases Win 9?
 


#11
This is beta version..when releases Win 9?

No...8.1 PreView is the Beta. The RTM (release to manufacturer) version, which is what the post thread topic is referring to, aka Windows Blue 8.1, is do to release at the end of August. Windows 9 is not even on the table yet.
 


Mike

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#12
"Windows 9" won't be out for another 3 years or more.
 


#13
but seeing the current market of the win 8 this does not look so far for the release of the win 9 .. for a better instance you may see the next version of the win in form of win 8.1 coming so much early withing a year of release of its previous version..
 


#14
but seeing the current market of the win 8 this does not look so far for the release of the win 9 .. for a better instance you may see the next version of the win in form of win 8.1 coming so much early withing a year of release of its previous version..

What????? Gibberish!!!!
 


strollin

Senior Member
#16
...
Do you swim? I happen to be a swimmer. I swim like a fish, actually. One thing I've always noticed with beginner swimmers is they always try to swim with their fingers completely spread. My advice to them is always "don't spread your fingers!". Now, imagine someone coming along and asking "what evidence do you have that swimming with fingers together is better than swimming with fingers all spread out?"

I would only stare at them, blink once, and then ask "I did not just hear that did I?"

No, I don't have any scientific study to reference. But anyone who knows how to swim will tell you that it's common sense to close the gaps between the fingers. They don't build paddles with holes. And people don't use nets to paddle their canoes. ...
This is a perfect example as to why we need evidence and shouldn't rely on intuition and anecdotes. Even though it seems counter-intuitive, competitive swimmers swim with their fingers slightly spread and their hand flat (not cupped), The idea is that you want to present as large a surface as possible to pull yourself thru the water. Having your fingers lightly spread offers a larger surface than having your fingers closed tightly.

See this article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...rs--forked-hands-speed-water-far-quicker.html
 


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#17
This is a perfect example as to why we need evidence and shouldn't rely on intuition and anecdotes. Even though it seems counter-intuitive, competitive swimmers swim with their fingers slightly spread and their hand flat (not cupped), The idea is that you want to present as large a surface as possible to pull yourself thru the water. Having your fingers lightly spread offers a larger surface than having your fingers closed tightly.

See this article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...rs--forked-hands-speed-water-far-quicker.html
Haha, attack the analogy instead of the point.

I didn't say everyone everywhere should always keep their fingers together. Beginners are not competitive swimmers. They can't control their fingers like competitive swimmers. You tell them to spread their fingers slightly and they spread out completely.

I'm sure competitive anything have their own techniques that the rest of us don't do. I see karate competitive marshal artists chop bricks. Should I tell my 8 yr old nephew who just started karate lessons to chop 3 layers of bricks just because the pros do it.

This is a perfect example of losing sight of the main point by attacking the analogy.

The point is a fresh install has a much higher chance of nothing going wrong than upgrade. If you want to dispute this then dispute this.
 


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strollin

Senior Member
#18
The point you were making was that we didn't need evidence because it was obvious what the correct way was and we didn't need any scientific evidence to prove it. I was illustrating why your point wasn't correct. Perfect example of losing track of what point you were trying to defend. Not only did you not prove your point with your analogy but you actually disproved your point.
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#19
Hi

This may be an opportunity to try out my old system for reinstalling, which I haven't tried for a long time.

MY process was to create a new user, boot to that User ID, and using MSconfig I set the boot to not open anything other than the basic Diagnostic Services.

Next logout and back in to that ID.
Then I run the update process using that User ID.

It doesn't pick up any preferences from the old user, when it boots it looks like a clean install, but all of the software is still installed and in place.

I've found that creating links for most of the software will make it work again without reinstalling, (a weeks work for me) and it will work like a clean installation.

I did this many times with Windows XP, it's how I fixed everyones computer who needed a reinstall, and a couple of times with Windows 7, I don't see any reason that I wouldn't work with Windows 8, but I don't know for sure, Windows 8 is a bit different.

I guess I can always do a clean install if it doesn't work out.
I never got around to installing the beta, and now that there's only a few weeks to go I'm going to wait and do it for real.

Mike
 


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