Bizarre wifi issue

awfulpigeon

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Joined
Feb 17, 2023
Messages
3
Hi, so my boyfriend's pc is unable to connect to our wifi. His computer (running windows 10) can "connect" to the network, but then it says there's no internet. We have tried updating wifi adapter drivers, resetting the ip configuration, doing a full network reset, flushing the dns cache, netsh winsock resetting, and obviously rebooting the router, modem, and computer several times. None of this has worked. Occasionally, it will start working for maybe 30 seconds, then break again. His computer is able to connect to other wifi networks, and his computer is the only one having issues with this particular network. We have completely exhausted our googling ability, everything is now just saying stuff we've already tried.
 


Do you know what version of Windows this person is using and what is the make/model of the wifi adapter?

Also, I know you said you did the full network reset, but go to Start -> cmd.exe (right-click to "Run as administrator") and type in:

Code:
netsh int ip reset
netsh winsock reset

After doing this restart. Its a long shot, but sometimes it will fix network issues you are having.
 


Do you know what version of Windows this person is using and what is the make/model of the wifi adapter?

Also, I know you said you did the full network reset, but go to Start -> cmd.exe (right-click to "Run as administrator") and type in:

Code:
netsh int ip reset
netsh winsock reset

After doing this restart. Its a long shot, but sometimes it will fix network issues you are having.
I said in the post we've already tried that. He is using windows 10 home and the wifi adapter is the Intel Dual Band wireless-AC 3168
 


I figured you may have just used the network reset from the Network & Internet cmdlet, and not the actual commands I mentioned.

If you have already tried the "netsh int ip reset" and "netsh winsock reset" commands and are still experiencing issues with your boyfriend's computer's internet connectivity, here are a few additional steps that you can try:
  1. Manually assign an IP address: You can try manually assigning an IP address to the computer's network adapter. Open the Network and Sharing Center in Windows and click on the "Change adapter settings" link. Right-click on the Wi-Fi adapter and choose "Properties", then select "Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)" and click on "Properties". Choose "Use the following IP address" and enter an IP address that is within the same subnet as your router, but outside the range of addresses used by the router's DHCP server. An example of this might be setting an IP of 192.168.1.42 on a network where the default gateway is 192.168.1.1. Or for instance, 192.168.0.42 on a network where the default gateway is 192.168.0.1. This step eliminates the DHCP server within the router as a possible culprit.
  2. Try changing the wireless security protocol: If you are using WPA2 security on your Wi-Fi network, try changing it to WPA or WEP and see if the computer can connect to the network. Some network adapters may have compatibility issues with certain security protocols.
  3. Try disabling IPv6: Some network adapters may have issues with IPv6 connectivity. To disable IPv6, open the Network and Sharing Center in Windows and click on the "Change adapter settings" link. Right-click on the Wi-Fi adapter and choose "Properties", then uncheck the box for "Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6)".
If none of these steps work, it's possible that there is a hardware issue with the computer's Wi-Fi adapter.

One other command you could try running is the following:

Code:
DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth && sfc /scannow

This will run two consecutive commands. One checks the Windows image files for issues and restores them back to the repository on your system. The second command runs scans of your system files off the Windows Side-By-Side repository and performs system file error correction/replacement. While its unlikely that this will solve the issue, if there is corruption somewhere in one of these files it will find it and correct it. It can take some time for the scans to run and complete.
 


I figured you may have just used the network reset from the Network & Internet cmdlet, and not the actual commands I mentioned.

If you have already tried the "netsh int ip reset" and "netsh winsock reset" commands and are still experiencing issues with your boyfriend's computer's internet connectivity, here are a few additional steps that you can try:
  1. Manually assign an IP address: You can try manually assigning an IP address to the computer's network adapter. Open the Network and Sharing Center in Windows and click on the "Change adapter settings" link. Right-click on the Wi-Fi adapter and choose "Properties", then select "Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)" and click on "Properties". Choose "Use the following IP address" and enter an IP address that is within the same subnet as your router, but outside the range of addresses used by the router's DHCP server. An example of this might be setting an IP of 192.168.1.42 on a network where the default gateway is 192.168.1.1. Or for instance, 192.168.0.42 on a network where the default gateway is 192.168.0.1. This step eliminates the DHCP server within the router as a possible culprit.
  2. Try changing the wireless security protocol: If you are using WPA2 security on your Wi-Fi network, try changing it to WPA or WEP and see if the computer can connect to the network. Some network adapters may have compatibility issues with certain security protocols.
  3. Try disabling IPv6: Some network adapters may have issues with IPv6 connectivity. To disable IPv6, open the Network and Sharing Center in Windows and click on the "Change adapter settings" link. Right-click on the Wi-Fi adapter and choose "Properties", then uncheck the box for "Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6)".
If none of these steps work, it's possible that there is a hardware issue with the computer's Wi-Fi adapter.

One other command you could try running is the following:

Code:
DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth && sfc /scannow

This will run two consecutive commands. One checks the Windows image files for issues and restores them back to the repository on your system. The second command runs scans of your system files off the Windows Side-By-Side repository and performs system file error correction/replacement. While its unlikely that this will solve the issue, if there is corruption somewhere in one of these files it will find it and correct it. It can take some time for the scans to run and complete.
Unfortunately, our level of tech savviness makes manually assigning an ip address seemingly out of the question. We tried disabling IPv6 and the console command you suggested, but neither worked. Also, I cant seem to change the security protocol, as the steps I've found online (entering your ip address into the address bar of a browser) haven't lead me anywhere. It says "connection refused."
 


Try to forget the wifi network (SSID) using this guide:


I know it sounds pretty rudimentary, and you may have already tried it, but sometimes this corrects the issue if there's a problem.
 


I saw this when moving from a wifi network in one place to a different wifi network in a different place.
The only solution I found was removing the wifi network device, followed by a reboot, the reboot found the removed wifi device, added it again and build up a new connection.
Someone a better solution?
 


You can try the troubleshooter pack and see if it can find the issue.
  • Click the Start Menu and locate Powershell
  • Right Click on the Powershell icon and select 'Run as Administrator'
  • Run the following command Get-TroubleshootingPack -Path C:\Windows\diagnostics\system\Networking\ | Invoke-TroubleshootingPack
  • For the instance ID just hit enter, then follow the prompts
 


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