BSOD on Win7 SP1

lemmy999

New Member
A couple of weeks back I suddenly started getting a PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA BSOD. I have run tests on the RAM, chkdsk /f on the HDD, and changed the page file to a large fixed size. However every day I am getting a bout 2 of these. I can leave the computer idle for days and not have a problem, but if I start using it constantly early in the morning after about 5 or so hours I will get a couple. Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Code:
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*                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
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PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)
Invalid system memory was referenced.  This cannot be protected by try-except.
Typically the address is just plain bad or it is pointing at freed memory.
Arguments:
Arg1: ffffffff8b60b4c0, memory referenced.
Arg2: 0000000000000000, value 0 = read operation, 1 = write operation.
Arg3: fffff88005bd720b, If non-zero, the instruction address which referenced the bad memory
    address.
Arg4: 0000000000000005, (reserved)
Hi,
Bugcheck 50 can be caused by a number if things, such as, faulty RAM, faulty system service, Anti Virus suites, or drivers. In fact the dump files (all of them) blame your graphics driver.
To be honest i'm not totally convinced that it is the actual graphics driver causing the bsod.
Personally the first thing I'd remove is the Anti Virus suite.
Please remove McAFEE and just use the onboard Defender or MSE until after testing, thank you.

Let's also update that Graphics driver too. Now with laptops you have to be careful where you get the drivers from. Almost always the place to find drivers is the manufacturers support page:
Support for Precision T3500 | Dell UK

When updating this driver please use the DDU or Display Driver Uninstaller to remove the original driver as this also removes any corruption or old bit's of driver left behind.
You'll need to boot into safe mode to use it best but it's well worth it:
Display Driver Uninstaller (DDU) V17.0.4.2 Released. - Wagnardsoft Forum

If the bsod continues then you'll need to test your RAM. Windows does have a memory testing app but it can miss errors and the best app for the job is Memtest86.
If you open the link below you'll see you can run Memtest86 in two ways. You can either burn it to disk or install it onto a USB drive it's entirely up to you. You'll then need to enter the bios to change the boot order so you can boot from either the Disk or USB stick you have Memtest86 on.
You must test for at least 12 hours unless it becomes obvious there is a problem straight away.
Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool

Please post any new dump files.

Edit:
I forgot to mention this driver: ImmunetNetworkMonitor.sys Please remove this as well as the AV suite.
 
Last edited:

lemmy999

New Member
I used DDU to uninstall the old driver and then installed the latest video driver that I downloaded from Dell. I also noted that the BSOD started the 2x per day occurrence on 12/19 and on 12/18 the update to Jave 8 (111) was installed. Is it possible this could be related?
 

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
the update to Jave 8 (111) was installed. Is it possible this could be related?
Well nothing showed in the dump files but I tend not to rule anything out with bluescreens.
See how you get on with the above changes and post any new dump files.
 

BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
I just updated my main W10 desktop PC to Java 8u111 from 8u101, with no BSOD. Also, it's worth noting there are a couple of Install Options in 8u111 that could cause problems. I recommend that you do NOT select the Yahoo! option *which Java recommends you install*, make sure to unselect that button. It has caused problems on some of my Customer's machines, especially if they were not using Yahoo for their E-mail.:crying:

And secondly, there is another option about detecting old versions of Java that were previously installed on your machine. On my W10 machines, I usually tell the Java Installer to REMOVE the older versions as the Java Installer tells you, it presents a security risk that allows Hackers to exploit your system.o_O Running concurrent old and new versions of Java on some machines has been known to cause Windows system instabilities; this is well-documented. :eek: On Customer machines, especially brand new Customers I never remove the old versions, as they are running some app from the XP-era or W7-era that has never been updated to W10, or even the latest W7 and also if they are using old .NET Framework versions as well, the older Java version is needed to make that App work properly with the ancient .NET Framework platform. So, blindly removing the older Java version can be the kiss of death to some of these outdated Apps.:skull: The Customer doesn't understand why the software maker can't update their program, however, in many cases the software company who made the App in question has since long gone out of business; so that update is never going to happen.:noway: The Customer is forced to abandon that App and try to find a similar replacement that is compatible to newer w7/W10 platform.

If you have some of these older apps running on your W7 machine, you should uninstall and reinstall the 8u111 update making sure to leave that old version on your hard drive (8u101 or whatever you have in your Programs and Features list). At least for testing purposes. If the BSODs continue, I'd suggest another uninstall/reinstall of the 8u111 update and this time select REMOVE the older version(s) the Java Installer finds. In some cases, it will find ancient versions of Java such a v7 or even v6; and you definitely need to get rid of those--but again, doing so may render some of your older Apps or Games inoperable or make your BSODs happen more frequently. If this is the case, you have to decide whether to remove those Apps and find replacements and in some cases this is going to cost you money if those Apps are fee-based.:cash: The Goal here is to see if the option in the Java Installer to remove older outdated Java versions to tighten up your machines security is going to make your machine have more BSODs or any at all.

If you determine that removing all your old Java versions from your machine resolves or partially resolves the problem, that's a step in the right direction.:) If things get worse, and you have 1 or more Apps that no longer work without the older Java version(s), you can go to CNET or Softpedia and download the standalone installers of the older Java versions and put them back. Of course, doing so could cause your machine to start the BSODs again.

Good luck,:eagerness:
<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>:cool:
 

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
I wouldn't bother with the above unless problems crop up again. Just keep your eye on it in case of...
 
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