Grub Rescue

Discussion in 'Linux Forums' started by seekermeister, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    Just dont let an openSUSE purist read that :D
     
  2. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    If that is the effect of being a purist, then I hope to never become one.
     
  3. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    Yeah openSUSE users get really anal about it too, its the one part of the community I dislike.
     
  4. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    Group mentalities seems to be quite common on forums. That is a major part of the reasons that I have found this one to my liking. While I may not agree with everyone here, at least I can think of them as individuals.
     
  5. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    Yeah I have visited a few linux forums like that.
    The one for SolydXK is really liberal
     
  6. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    Is there some way that I can set Kubuntu, so that it doesn't keep requiring me to login every time that I try to do anything? I don't mind logging in on first boot, but so long as I'm logged in as the administrator, I shouldn't have to log in again to change anything.
     
    #186 seekermeister, Nov 16, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  7. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    No, not really.
    By default admin tasks need passwords in linux, its just how it is.
    Its one of the reasons why linux is more secure
     
  8. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    It may be more secure on a computer that is used by more than one person, but that computer is not mine. Personally, I prefer an OS to do what I want it to, rather than it telling me what to do. I keep hoping that someday that Linux will become more attune to my preferences, but it is becoming increasingly clear that is a vain hope.
     
  9. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    There is another "little" quirk that you might be able to help with...Default Programs. The options that can be set are quite limited, but I do have Opera set as the default browser, yet when I select a link from an email it opens in Firefox. Also, I can't remember exactly when, but sometimes a page is opened in Rekong. It seems that Kubuntu doesn't understand exactly what the definition of "Default" is. Is there some way that I can teach it?
     
  10. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    Well you can bypass the passwords in linux but its not advisable.
    After all windows has dozens of security issues because it gives administration rights by default.
    In windows anyone can be administrator and screw up the system but in linux there are barriers.
    Just because you dont like the extra passwords doesnt mean the whole spectrum of linux has to change just for you.
    If you like insecurity, vulnerability and a system that anyone can hack into just use Windows.
    Sorry if this sounds like a nasty reply here, but its a common thing I see windows users ask and sometimes force is needed to get a point across.
    I mean its just a password after all and is only one minor step in the grand scheme of things.
    Plus in Kubuntu its only one password, in some distros you need both a admin password and a user password.
    To be honest with you passwords should have been a standard in windows too, its no wonder why XP had so many holes.
    Windows 7 is better as it uses UAC but even that can be circumvented.

    Here is a PCworld article covering some of the key reasons why linux is more secure:

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/202452/why_linux_is_more_secure_than_windows.html

    Actually you can teach it, using the system settings and going into "default applications"
    For more complex file associations there is the file associations section.
     
  11. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    It really doesn't matter whether you agree with me or not, because it all boils down to a matter of personal preference. The suggestion that if one doesn't like the way that Linux does something, that he should stay with Windows, is an attitude that I dislike even when something similar comes to a Window's user. There is only one that is ultimately responsible for how secure or insecure that their computer is, and that is the person who own it. For an OS to have the ability to change or disable default behavior doesn't mean that everyone should use it, but neither does it mean that they shouldn't, as long as they understand the consequences. If you dislike answering a question, then don't. It's not necessary to chide someone for asking.

    As for using the Default Applications, that doesn't work, because as I said, I did that before asking the question. I have some idea of what you mean by setting file associations, but I don't understand how that would apply to which browser would respond to a particular type of file/link depending on it's location, rather than it's type?
     
    #191 seekermeister, Nov 18, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  12. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I was experimenting with Reayboost in Windows, and then decided to delete the readyboost.sfcache file it had created on the flash drive to return it to being just a regular flash drive, but Windows wouldn't permit me to delete it, because it said that the file was in use by the system. So I rebooted into Kubuntu, thinking to delete it there, but each time I try, it says that the Trash had reached it maximum capacity and to empty it manually. Even after doing so, it continues to squawk about the size each time that I try, so I still have the 4GB file on the drive, and am trying to figure out how to get rid of it?

    Besides getting rid of the file, I'm surprised that there is such a small size limit to the Trash...how big is it, and can I set it larger?
     
  13. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I got rid of the readyboost file, so that only leaves the question about the size of trash?
     
  14. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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  15. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    yeah you can set trash to unlimited space, go into your file manager (dolphin) and go to your control button, there select "configure dolphin"
    go to trash and change the limit there.

    If you dont have a control button in dolphin it can be accessed via the menus in "settings"
     
  16. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    Thanks, but I don't think that the size was the current problem. I think that it was a corruption of the Trash metadata file. I deleted it as suggested in the link in my last post, and it appears that solved the problem.

    However, your suggestion led me to another thing I felt was wrong, because the Trash properties was set to only warn me if the Trash became full, so I reset it to automatically delete the oldest file when full. I saw a setting for having it empty the Trash after a certain number of days instead, but I would prefer if I could simply empty it when I chose, but that doesn't appear to be possible.
     
  17. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    Yeah the trash bin is tied into your KDE settings so if you reset you have to change it.
    By the way while I have been gone (been busy with the holiday season, hellish time for everyone really) I think maybe I can give a distro suggestion to you again if you are beginning to get fed up with Kubuntu.
    You may actually want to give openSUSE 13.1 a shot, the latest release is very solid and stable and if you had a bad experience with openSUSE in the past I could guide you into a transition if it becomes needed.
    I have been having a great experience personally.
     
  18. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I have tried openSUSE so many times in the past, and gave up on it, I wouldn't try it again, except for your recommendation. I have it downloading now, but I'm not too sure exactly when I will have time to install it. As you implied, I am getting a bit tired of Kubuntu, not that it would be so bad, except a couple of problems that I haven't been able to solve, and even some problems that I have solved, but it seems that every time a solution is found, another problem takes it's place.

    I expect that I shall need your help, perhaps even more than before, because as it was, openSUSE required more manual configuration than Kubuntu does.
     
  19. Ralph Bromley

    Ralph Bromley Honorable Member

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    well the one way to avoid a lot of the configuration is to download the live image.
    The primary on openSUSE's website is pointing to an installer dvd, not a live one.
    This is mainly for people who use it more regularly, the live KDE will give you a working desktop without the frills and a installer.
     
  20. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    But the live image is primarily for running from a DVD without installing it...true? I've already downloaded the DVD iso, so I'm tending to go in that direction. I may not use all of them, but if it has more features, that is what I would prefer to get. My regularity of use would be heavily dependent upon me being able to accomplish everything that I want with the OS. In this situation I feel that more is better than not enough.
     

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