Microsoft to show Blue at conference

kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#1
The Verge has revealed more details on the Windows Blue release:


Microsoft is gearing up to release its first public preview version of Windows Blue at its Build developer conference in late June. Sources familiar with Microsoft's plans have revealed that the company started work on a "milestone preview" version of Windows Blue earlier this month. The code, a second milestone of the next version of Windows, will go on to form a public preview that will be made available to developers and enthusiasts during the company's Build conference.
After holding Build at its campus in Redmond in October last year, Microsoft is moving to San Francisco for its latest Build developer conference in late June. The companyacknowledged its Blue codename earlier this week, noting that it's unlikely the final product will be called Windows Blue. An early milestone build leaked to the internetrecently, providing a first look at some of the features that Microsoft is planning for its Windows 8 upgrade.


We're told that Microsoft is working on a number of new first-party Windows 8 applications, in addition to the alarms, sound recorder, calculator, and movie moments applications that were revealed in a recent leak. One of the big changes in Blue, deprecating the existing Snap View, will be implemented fully in the milestone preview. We understand that running apps side-by-side in a variety of ways is a key part of Microsoft's plans to introduce Windows Blue to 7- and 8-inch devices. Microsoft is removing a resolution limit on its Snap View, allowing OEMs to push the operating system to lower screen sizes. Sources have revealed that applications will also be able to occupy multiple Snap Views, allowing you to read your Inbox while composing an email side-by-side, or the ability to see two Internet Explorer tabs open side-by-side.
Microsoft is only planning one public preview version of Windows Blue, with the final software and new hardware expected to ship later this year.
Reference:

Windows Blue public preview planned for Build developer conference | The Verge
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#2
It seems a little strange to me that one day you folks are discussing "Leaked" versions of a new OS to be released, as I understand it, Nov. 2014. But I am already seeing adds on the side of this forum page about Windows Azure.....

So, a couple of questions:

Considering announcements of future products could hurt sales of current products, what motivation might Microsoft have to make such a public disclosure?

And second, some of us feel Vista was just the Beta for Windows 7. Could the same type scenario be taking place with Windows 8 and its successor?

Edit: I am seeing things about Azure that describe it as a Cloud Computing type setup and is already available. But the questions are still valid...
 


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davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#3
My "rumours", Saltgrass, are that Blue is a substantial upgrade to Windows 8, not (IMO) as proposed new OS. AS in another thread on this forum, one or two of us have already tried out an early release, and it does appear to be just that.
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#4
So if they are not going to call it Blue?
Maybe it will be Windows 8a. Windows 95 had subsequent releases of 95a, 95b and 95c all spaced approximately a year apart.
Or maybe they'll call it Windows 8 Second Edition. Windows 98 had a subsequent release in the form of Windows 98 Second Edition, again about a year after initial release.
So what they are doing is not particularly a new concept, I think we've all just gotten used to the term Service Pack since everything went over to the NT Kernel.
As far as hype about the new version, I haven't seen much so far and really don't expect much as from what I've seen of it, unless there is a lot of hidden benefits coming, I don't think it will warrant much hooplah.

A few cosmetic items, a couple new apps and supposedly a lot of work done on overall efficiency to make it perform better on handheld / mobile devices and provide better battery life. I suppose we'll hear more during the Build Conference. But as always I'm looking forward to it, as I do so love that new Operating System smell.:)
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#5
That's about it. The Modern screen , as I said, is a little easier to use,. a couple or so of extra items but, as Trouble says, actual mods or improvements, so far, are minimal.

Windws 8 SE? I like that!!!
 


kemical

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#6
Blue is just code name picked up by the channel. If you really want to know what will be happening with Microsoft and Windows then here it is:

'Windows Blue' is the first of a series of updates to the os. This one we won't pay for but others don't be too sure.
Major os releases will become a thing of the past and the 'operating system' (I don't want to call it a number as this will be debatable) will be updated by yearly updates like Windows Blue.
Say goodbye to the Desktop. Microsoft want to get rid of it and probably by the next major update after Blue (what some call Windows 9) it will be gone.

This of course has yet to come to pass but search enough and the info is out there.

Is the future bright? Not too sure yet....
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#7
Makes perfect sense when you think about it.
There has to be an incredible number of lines of code in place to sustain the "Desktop" interface environment. Why would we need two? assuming they manage to actually get the "Start Screen" to actually function well and make it somewhat customizeable. I mean, after all, what do we really do, on or with the "Desktop"..... we click stuff, so who really cares if we click that same stuff somewhere else.
 


Mitchell_A

Essential Member
#8
I mean, after all, what do we really do, on or with the "Desktop"..... we click stuff, so who really cares if we click that same stuff somewhere else.
People don't seem to enjoy having programs and apps layed out in a large, simplistic manner and are often dazed and confused by it :confused:

I entirely agree Microsoft is trying to phase out the desktop, I think if they had more time they would of phased it out with the release of Windows 8. For once their trying to be leaders rather than last to market, by unifying the bridge between desktop operating system and tablet operating systems. Instead of having a Mac with OSX and an iPad with iOS, Microsoft thinks the world could do fine with a computer running Windows 8 and a tablet running... well the exact same thing. That ensures maximum compatibility and synchronization across devices.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#9
Makes perfect sense when you think about it.
I entirely agree Microsoft is trying to phase out the desktop
I was going to post a really good sarcastic response to these posts, but for brevity I decided to go straight to the heart of the matter.

I have tried as hard as I can to accept Windows 8 as a Desktop replacement for Windows 7, but I cannot. Windows 8 is a mobile application and does not work well in a Desktop setting. The improvements in the basic OS do not outweigh the User Interface inefficiencies.

I have decided to remove my only copy of Windows 8 I have for a reference to use in this forum, which means I will no longer be able to help support this OS.

Hopefully, Microsoft will recognize the direction they have chosen with Windows 8, is not good for the Desktop community, IMHO.
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#10
That is very sad, saltgrass.
I have always regarded Windows 8 as an accomplished dual purpose OS. (Even tri purpose, if you include the touch side)
However, I do agree that, with the relatively minor performance improvements, it is nor worth anyone's hard earned money to purchase the OS. Individual users can live very happily with Windows 7. This would particularly apply to companies, who would embark on a vast spending campaign, for only a modest improvement.
But. In the essence of your post. What are the items which you do not feel work well for you on the desktop?
There are numerous posts on the old issue of the start menu and, as many have mentioned, though controversial, there does not appear to be a great deal of gain in turning the OS into something which looks like Windows 7. However, as I stated earlier, I don't have a problem with that. (IMO) that is what the OS is all about - dual purpose.
But, on this rather worn subject, I see no difference between, for example, these, one is the earlier Windows 7 menu, the other is my Windows 8 menu.
To get to the latter, after some work on, say some correspondence, I press the Windows key. In windows 7 it was necessary too press the orb, selec programs and then the required item.
But, the subject of the start menu is , as I say, worn out. What were your other problems?
 


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Joe S

Excellent Member
#11
As far as I'm concerned MS has thumbed their nose at desktop users and decided to ram their idea down the user's throat. Besides the start menu issue they dumped aero and sidebar gadgets which a lot of people liked. It would have helped MS a lot if they had bothered to actually have some really nice finished aps in the app store during the beta instead of junk. They also should have had a training video ready when they released the first beta. When you buy a new car they don't rearrange the position of the steering wheel, gas pedal, brake pedal, etc and expect you to relearn how to drive with their new ideas.
Joe
 


#12
They, MS, took these down do to exploits and vulnerabilities that would expose ones system to attacks, kind of a back door to do harm.

When you buy a new car they don't rearrange the position of the steering wheel, gas pedal, brake pedal, etc and expect you to relearn how to drive with their new ideas
You do if you travel around the world...steering wheel is on the wrong side, have to learn to shift with left hand and drive on the wrong side of the road....

I do understand the point you're trying to make.

To be fair, if something new is to be had, there has to be a beginning to it some where.
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#13
The comparison with a car could be incorrect. You only mentioned hardware. Microsoft have changed nothing in the hardware, that is a responsibility of other manufacturers. However, if I can indulge in the car comparison fantasy.::
I am no longer young. I have driven, until a month ago, a 25 year old car. Last month I purchase a secondhand car, 6years old. After driving it 8kms from the garage to home, I found it necessary to sit down, in the car, with the handbook, and find out what the 37 different levers and buttons did, half of which had not even been functions on the previous vehicle.
There was, in essence, a similar handbook supplied with Windows 8 - help and support, mostly on the HD. There were also several Microsoft documentation tutorials, as well as a multitude of third party efforts, on the subject.

As an example, here is one only:

Windows 8 Accessibility Tutorials
 


lorenkjr1

Extraordinary Member
#14
I agree. I have been using just the tile interface mostly for the past few days. I can see where I could easily not miss the desktop at all. But, I do believe the tile interface has a ways to go yet before we will see the desktop disappear completely. And I am not that sold on the idea you must have a touch monitor for the tile interface. It seems to work just fine with a mouse also.
I do so wish the app store had a search feature by now. But, maybe someday. Be well!
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#15
I do so wish the app store had a search feature by now.
Actually it does, or at least a bit of one and it works reasonably well if you have an idea or what you are looking for to begin with.
Next time you're in the App store just evoke the Charms Bar (Win Logo Key + C) and try the search utility from there it works fairly well.
And then there are a couple new sites that purportedly will perform a search for you. Here's one MetroStore
Personally I don't find them too much more robust then just using search.
Regards
Randy
 


davehc

Essential Member
Premium Supporter
#16
Works reasonably well. As Trouble says, you have to have an idea of what you are seeking. That would apply to any search engine.
Say I want to find an App for Backgammon. I open Search from the charms bar, click Store, and type in Backgammon in the search box.
Within seconds, eight backgammon programs are lined up.
 


lorenkjr1

Extraordinary Member
#17
Thanks to all for the info on using search from the charms bar for the Windows Store. It sure makes things a lot easier than scrolling thru everything looking for what I want. I really feel pretty darn comfortable using the tile interface now. It would be a real winner if they had a way for the non-programmer types to make a tile for all their programs.
 


Mitchell_A

Essential Member
#18
A little shortcut to search within an app (launched or not) is to press Win+Q . You can also search files with Win+F. Saves a few clicks.
 


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