Multiple Monitors

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by seekermeister, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    Damn good point badrobot with priority. It's the exact same way with my mobo and HDD's. I found out the hard way when connecting an old IDE drive for storage, then decided to do a clean install. The MBR was installed on the IDE drive by default (priority) and the rest on a HDD where I told it to install, then upon reboot I got the error message "no OS found". So I had to delete the MBR on the IDE drive, uplug the IDE drive, re-do the clean install and then the MBR was installed on the correct direct and I had a working OS. A real PITA for sure. Now I know....good catch.
     
  2. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    badrobot,

    I realize that nothing is certain, when it comes to computers, therefore it isn't possible to give absolute answers, but words like "guess", "probably", etc. are somewhat less concrete than I would prefer. I guess the only way to know is to buy another monitor and find out.

    There are a lot of variables in picking a monitor also, which makes making a decision less simple than I would like. For instance, whether to get a LED or LCD? As I recall, contrast ratio is not standardized, but how to figure when one monitor has a ratio of 1000:1, and another has a ratio 100,000;1. Logic says that more is better, but is it really, or is that merely smoke and mirrors?
     
    #42 seekermeister, Nov 27, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2013
  3. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    The big difference between LED and LCD is; less power consumption and less heat produced and a very thin profile. Yes...the contrast ratio...more is better, meaning the depth of the color being reproduced, especially with black.

    Basically it boils down to doing your research.
     
  4. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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  5. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    And also depends on your budget and what you are planning to do with it. If you are just going to surf the net with it and not do any gaming, watch HD movies or work with computer graphics... you are good with the less expensive LCD screen that you can find.
    You don't wanna waste your time and effort doing a lot of research what to get if your needs is as basic as booting up a BIOS screen on primary monitor.
     
    #45 badrobot, Nov 27, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2013
  6. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    Basically, I agree. However that doesn't mean that I don't want the best within my budget. I probably will not get a WS, because I have found that at the distance that my secondary monitor sits, that a screen with less resolution sort of magnifies images making them easier to see or read. I probably will go with another LCD, because power savings with an LED is not really a factor for me, but then I'm wondering if there is a reliability factor involved? Would a cooler monitor also mean a monitor that would last longer...do LEDs also sometimes have dead pixels?
     
  7. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I guess that I'm going to have to break down and buy another monitor or graphics card, because even though swapping video cards solved the problem with the BIOS screens display, I had forgotten why I had moved my GTX 460 SE to the other computer in the first place. Sometimes it crashes the computer when starting a game, and even sometimes whey doing something even less explicable, like selecting a tab in my browser. I should have RMAed it, but didn't have anything to take it's place while being replaced. Still haven't decided whether it will be a monitor or card that I will buy?
     
  8. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I guess I should have followed your advice before, because my secondary monitor just died. Apparently, from what I gathered on this thead:

    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.electronics.repair/hcK_c0R9CyM

    There is probably a bad capacitor, which could be replaced, but I'm not much good with a soldering iron any longer, so I will probably buy a new monitor. Hate to beat a dead horse, but this takes me back to our original discussion. I'm not going to get another VGA monitor, but in the DVI category is there anything special that I should be aware of in making a decision?
     
  9. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    My curiosity got the better of me, and I decided to take a look at the inside of the monitor. I got it most of the way apart, but there are ~ 5 ribbon cables that keep the major components tied together, preventing me from getting the access necessary to assess the situation. These are the type of cables that don't have connectors that simply snap apart. The connectors are soldered to the PCB and the wires themselves are somehow just slid into them. When I have attempted to reconnect wires like these in the past, I always found that they don't have the stiffness necessary to push them back in. Is there a trick to this within the grasp of a layman, or should I just toss everything in the dumpster?
     
  10. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    You could get a soldering pen/iron/gun, heat up the solder points with soldering unit and reinsert the cables.
     
  11. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I don't think that would work, because the only surfaces accessible are plastic, and the solder gun would just melt either the connector or the wire's insulation.
     
  12. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    You got a snap shot of what your talking about....you have my curiosity peaked now.
     
  13. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    I would but I use my camera so little, that I've forgotten how to use it. Not that just pointing and shooting is difficult, but controlling the flash and focusing up close is. I could probably figure it out eventually, but I know that I would soon forget again, and it gets somewhat frustrating. I decided to order a stubby screwdriver, so that I can just detach the PCBs with the cables remaining attached. So perhaps I can fix it when it arrives. If not, nothing much lost.
     
  14. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    The stubby worked for removing the PCBs, but it still required a lot of fiddling with the connectors. I broke a couple of them, one which I may be able to fix by re-soldering the wire and one that I broke the locking tab on. I think that I found the culprit, a large capacitor near what looks like a transformer, which fits the description I found in the thread linked above. However, I want to confirm my hunch, which involves what constitutes a swollen capacitor? I've always had the vision of one having an enlargement of the circumference, but this one just has a convex top end. It may seem like a dumb question, but is that what a swollen capacitor looks like?
     
  15. Josephur

    Josephur Windows Forum Admin
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    Capacitors start bulging at the top as part of their design to vent the internals instead of exploding if need be. Depending on the make of capacitor even a slight bulge can be an indication of failure. Good news is they are usually easily fixable with a little soldering skill. Just make sure you replace them with a reputable brand.
     
  16. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    It may not be a good idea, but I had in mind to see if I could find an identical capacitor on some other component in my junk collection. I don't know if any are the right spec, but I know that some of my old motherboards have some capacitors of the same size.
     
  17. Josephur

    Josephur Windows Forum Admin
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    Size is NOT what matters, the specifications of the capacitor are what matters. Take your time, find out what cap you need and buy the correct one!!!
     
  18. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    Yes, I understand, but I'm not inclined to buy one IF I already have a used one that is right. If not, then I will order one, but that raises the question of what is a reputable brand, as you alluded to previously?
     
  19. Josephur

    Josephur Windows Forum Admin
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    There are many, what is the capacitor in question? What's the micro farad rating written on it?

    I actually reclaim components now that I have a good hot air rework station, I may have what you need in fact :)
     
  20. seekermeister

    seekermeister Honorable Member

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    Hmm, the best I could see, none of my old capacitors are right. I appreciate the thought, but from what I Googled, it appears that the capacitor would be so cheap, that it wouldn't make any sense to use an old one anyway. The one needing replacement is a Kermei 1000 uF 16v, what would you suggest as a replacement?
     

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