upgrade of Windows 7

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by dewduster, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. dewduster

    dewduster New Member

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    Good Morning: I have just installed the upgrade to Vista Premium with Windows 7 Upgrade. I am using and Acer Aspire 7720 laptop. Everthing seems fine except I have a 1" border on the left and right side of my screen. I have tried clicking the minimize button and it minimizes but doesn't take care of the borders. Any suggestions. thanks dewduster:frown:
     
  2. I'm not sure what you mean by a 1-inch "border". Are you talking about a 1" dark area in which nothing is displayed on the monitor? Or are you saying that a window won't stretch fully left-and-right? Can you give us a screenshot of what you're talking about? (You can press the Print Screen key at any time and then paste into your image editor. Then shrink it so that it will fit on this web page, and post it in your reply using the "Insert Image" icon just to the right of the globe ("Insert Link") icon on the toolbar above the comment area.)
     
  3. reghakr

    reghakr Excellent Member

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    An upgrade is not the right route to take as it leaves useless files on your system and cab cause conflicys.

    I would save all your Documents, Music, Pictures, contacts, videos, etc.

    Now pop the DVD in and perform a "clean" install by choosing the Advanced box.

    You will however, have to re-install all your 3rd part applications.
     
  4. The more upgrade problems that I run into, the more appealing sounds the idea of using Windows Easy Transfer to save files and settings, do a clean installation (officially known as a "custom" installation in Microsoft-speak), reinstall applications, and then import the Windows Easy Transfer file.

    That's the real catch, isn't it? I suppose the decision depends on the amount of time required to reinstall the applications and WET import vs. the time it takes to troubleshoot an upgrade installation. As far as the supposed space savings you would get, I'm not sure how important that is when considering the plummeting costs of storage. But the mere existence of incompatible files on a system to be upgraded, even if they have been rendered inactive, have been known to cause problems during an upgrade.

    Given that I charge a lot for frustration, a clean installation is probably cheaper.
     
  5. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    A clean install needn't be particularly painful if you plan ahead.
    Making a list of all your apps and saving the installers to external media is helpful.

    Win 7 has a huge catalog of drivers so most if not all hardware will be detected and at least generic drivers installed during setup and install.
    In my case, on an Acer 5672 WLMi notebook all hardware except my ATi Moblity Radeon X1400 video card and Logitech Quickcam Pro 9000 webcam was detected and appropriate drivers installed during the Win 7 installation routine.

    With XP I had to manually install almost all hardware drivers including my Network Interface Card.
    With XP I couldn't even go online until I manually installed drivers for my NIC.

    Win 7 was online before it booted to the first stable desktop.
    The first Windows update installed the Videocard and webcam drivers.
    Acer also has the very latest drivers for the X1400 video card and the Logitech has the latest drivers and utilities as well.
    The advantage of using the Acer software is that it installs the Catalyst Control Center.
     
  6. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Most people are fixing this by running their video control program.. that came with the drivers... and using the FORCE option. If your video driver doesn't have a control program you can try this....

    Click "start" and type and enter "resolution" and try other settings with the slider.
     
  7. You are, of course, right. But [em]should[/em] one do a "clean" installation as opposed to an upgrade?

    Since we have to compare apples to apples, an upgrade (theoretically) would not require you to reinstall your applications. So, let's say that the upgrade works successfully and compare that with how long it takes to to a clean installation, which includes a significant step that is not required during an upgrade: how long did it take you to reinstall your applications and to get the UI configuration just the way you like it, with all of your shortcuts in place, the colors just right, etc. (I won't count the time needed to backup, restore, and tweak, since that would be the same in either case).

    [em]If[/em] an upgrade is successful, and there's no way to know in advance if it will not be full of painful problems to solve, then that route obviously is cheaper. But it seems that there's an almost even chance that some significant pain will be involved, sometimes delaying deployment for days.

    The relative painlessness of a "clean" install might be preferable to gambling with your peace of mind.
     
  8. fjgold

    fjgold New Member

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    Well it boils down to this with me anyway. I will never do an upgrade. For example I've been using Ubuntu linux since the earliest days and have faithfully downloaded and clean installed every new release since.
    Although the Synaptic package manager offers to do in place upgrades of the latest releases the only time I tried this was a complete disaster.
    I ended up clean installing anyway. This basically took twice as long including my futile attempts to fix the damage caused by the failed in place upgrade.

    Given the extreme complexity of Windows I can't see anything but grief coming from doing an in place upgrade.
    I have a choice and will do a clean install when the time comes.
    I already have the plans in place as well as screenshots of my desktop (for shortcut placement etc.) and have all relevant app installers and program CD\DVD's available.
    I have done many OS clean installs over the years and don't expect too much trouble.
    Win 7 itself makes the process easier compared to XP.

    Besides I don't have and have never used Vista so an upgrade is out of the question anyway.
    I plan on keeping my XP install in it's present multiboot configuration with Win 7 Home Premium. All I need to do is
    pre format my present Win 7 RC partition and run the installer flash drive.

    I have most of my apps in the form of non install apps, eg: PortableFirefox, Portable Thunderbird and Portable Open Office etc.
    They are setup and fully customized and are on a separate partition.
    When Win 7 final is installed all I have to do is create shortcuts.
    I also have the folders in /user/frank on that partition (my data is therefore on my separate partition).
    When I install Win 7 I will associate the same folders to the separate partition.
    All part of the plan and preparation.
     
  9. You've made several good points, but that one sends chills through me! Oh, how I long for the days of the .ini file, when associations constituted the primary use of the registry, and the the operating structure of the most complex programs was easy to see! I want /everything/ to be portable.
     
  10. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    If you have to do a clean install... which is recommended by the most experienced here as well as Microsoft, here is some info you may find useful. It's a partial quote from Windows 7 Tweaks, Tricks, Tips, Secrets, Shortcuts, Solutions and Fixes

    Install Win 7 from a bootable 4gb USB drive with 1 click.

    * Download UNetbootin tool (free) from here:
    Download UNetbootin, Universal Netboot Installer from SourceForge.net

    If your upgrade is from Digital Rivers, you'll need to put the files in an ISO format first.

    Run the tool, and browse to your Windows 7 ISO image file and click OK and
    select the drive letter of your USB. That’s all!

    It takes about 15 minutes to finish. (Remember the boot sequence in your bios
    must be set to use the USB first.) Windows installs in about half the time
    from USB... even the cheap ones read about 25 kb/s ...while dvd reads about 5
    kb/s

    3 days after Microsoft released Windows 7 they were getting so many tech support
    calls about upgrading problems that they - basically copied the Unetbootin utility
    *idea* and released one that does the same thing. However they were found to be in violation
    of open source code standards and had to remove it from their website. However, it's
    still available if you Google because once you let something out on the Internet.... well as they say
    information wants to be free. Note: in releasing this utility Microsoft re-wrote their EULA in
    regards to using an UPGRADE key with a clean install. They are working on re-writing
    this utility from the ground up, using their own code. For those who don't know about
    Unetbootin it is a very useful tool, especially for someone running XP or installing on
    a laptop.
     
  11. As far as I know, Microsoft does not recommend doing what it officially calls a "custom" installation (which is what the rest of the world calls a "clean" installation) over an upgrade. Like most other people, they understand that the method that you choose depends on your situation. See their FAQ at

    Installing Windows: frequently asked questions

    and note their answer to the question "Should I upgrade or perform a custom installation?". However, if Microsoft does actively advocate a custom installation over an upgrade, I would be grateful to see a link to that advice from them.

    Whatever you do, read that FAQ.

    Nevertheless, I have found that a clean installation is less frustrating than an upgrade if the upgrade fails, although a "clean" installation will require more time to perform since you have to reinstall your applications. But I have had some upgrades turn out fine -- and they finished almost before the coffee was ready. Give it a shot. If it doesn't work then you can always do it clean.

    But do a full backup in case you need to go back to your old OS, and use Windows Easy Transfer to save your files and settings in case you are forced to do a clean installation. Do both before using either method, just in case.

    Note that you can use Windows Easy Transfer (WET) to create an archive file containing all of your personal files and settings from your old operating system. You can then import this file into Windows 7. You can download WET for Windows XP at:

    Download details: Windows Easy Transfer for Windows XP

    and for Windows Vista at

    Download details: Windows Easy Transfer for transferring from Windows Vista (32 bit) to Windows 7

    or

    Download details: Windows Easy Transfer for transferring from Windows Vista (64 bit) to Windows 7

    Also see:

    Installing Windows: recommended links

    and click the link to "Installing and reinstalling Windows 7". You can find links to Microsoft's recommended procedure for either scenario under that link, too. Those pages can help you decide which scenario is best for you, and they provide very good instructions.

    One other thing: there is no email client built into Windows 7. If you use Windows Mail or Outlook Express and want to import your mail or contacts, you're pretty much screwed. Windows Live Email might be able to do it, but I don't use it so I'm not sure.

    Before you leave your old operating system, make sure you export your mail to a .pst file (used by Exchange and Outlook) and your contacts to a .csv file (a more or less universal structure). Maybe you'll be able to import those back into whatever email client you end up using, e.g., Microssoft Outlook or Mozilla Thunderbird, if any.
     
  12. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Experts like me always recommend that you pickup a new hard drive since the price is down to about 5 cents per GB. You can get a 2 tb 7,200 rpm drive for $115. Do a clean install to it.... take your time move over everything you want to keep from the old drive then eventually format it and clone your new drive so you have a perfect BOOTABLE backup. Should something go wrong you can simply modify your boot priority and be up and running in about 60 to 90 seconds. .. no hastle with unEASY transfer, no restoring any backup, no re-activation, not dependent on 3rd party program to get to the files in your backup, no risk in the backup archive being corrupt.. or your backup TOTALLY LOST if you had put it on another partition and your hard drive failed.

    If you google you'll find several references to Microsoft recommending a clean (custom) install... ALWAYS, if you upgrade from XP, RC, and from 32 to 64 bit. MOST of the time if you run your problem through their troubleshooting page it will return the solution = custom install. Here is the url.

    https://support.microsoft.com/oas/default.aspx?gprid=14019&st=1


    As for using a "workaround" to custom / clean install to a new harddrive,
    Microsoft Says Windows 7 Install Workaround Is Legal

    Gregg Keizer, Computerworld
    Oct 30, 2009 12:00 am
    Microsoft today confirmed that users can apply a workaround trick to do a clean install of Windows 7 on a blank hard drive ....that follows the relaxed rules Microsoft announced in January 2008 for Windows Vista, when it modified the EULA for Home Premium .
     
  13. Can you provide a link to where Microsoft recommends a clean installation over an upgrade when an in-place upgrade is possible? I haven't found any.

    However, since it isn't possible to do an in-place upgrade from XP or a release candidate to Windows 7, or from a 32-bit to a 64-bit operating system, I suppose you could say that Microsoft "recommends" a clean installation, although it would be more correct to say that it is mandatory since you don't have the choice to do an in-place upgrade. And, naturally, if an in-place upgrade fails then your only option is to do a custom installation. So I suppose you could call that a "recommendation", too, even though, once again, you don't have any alternative.

    I notice that you don't provide the link to the whole article so that we can read it for ourselves. The link that you do provide pertains only to Windows Vista Home Premium when used in a virtualized environment, which is not a relevant scenario for most users. In addition, when you read the entire article, you'll notice that neither the author nor the Microsoft spokesman say that an illegal workaround is legal. Perhaps this will clarify the issue:

    Windows 7 upgrade media will do a "clean" installation without reverse-engineering it to allow installation of a version of Windows 7 which is not covered by that media's license. In other words, copying the media, deleting the ei.cfg file, and then burning new media is illegal. It is not necessary to do that to do a "clean" installation. It is only necessary to do that if you want to create media to install a version of Windows 7 for which you don't have a license, which is quite illegal.

    To do a clean installation to a blank hard drive using upgrade media, all you need to do is to follow Microsoft's instructions. Install your old licensed operating system first, boot to it. If it is eligible for an in-place upgrade (e.g., if you're going from 64-bit Vista to 64-bit Windows 7), the Windows 7 installer will offer that option. If it is not, your only choice will be to do a "custom" installation, during which you can wipe your hard drive.

    Of course, the registry hack and use of slmgr described here:
    is quite legal if you meet the other licensing requirements. As Eric Ligman, of Microsoft's Worldwide Partner Group has been widely quoted as saying, "'Technically possible' does not always mean legal". While that procedure can be used to install and activate Windows 7 to a computer when you don't own a previous version of Windows that could legally be run on that machine, doing so is illegal. You must own a version of Windows that is legal for that machine in order to install Windows from the upgrade media.

    Oh, and one other thing: that hack is completely unnecessary if you follow Microsoft's instructions.

    Hopefully, there will be no further mention of methods involving reverse-engineering Microsoft's installation media, such as by deleting the ei.cfg file. They are not legal, and when Microsoft deploys a WGA detector for such tricks, and you should not bet against it, then you won't be able to get Windows Updates anymore.
     
  14. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    I just made it up.
     
  15. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Don't be afraid people. If you activate windows... you will get updates. Microsoft NEEDS every system to be secure. They aren't stoopid. They don't want any unsecured computers waiting to be exploited when vulnerabilities are discovered.
     
  16. If Microsoft wanted to allow Windows Updates for unlicensed machines, don't you think they would have done it already?

    It appears that you are once again advocating using Windows 7 upgrade media illegally, as you did in this article. But when WGA puts such an installation into reduced functionality mode, it will turn out to not have been a good idea.

    I recommend that people buy the correct media for the type of installation that they want to do. That way you avoid not only licensing problems, the time involved configuring workarounds, and WGA, but you also won't be breaking the law. If you want to save money, you can always buy an OEM version from a qualified vendor like NewEgg (there are lots of them out there). But you won't legally be able to move that installation to another computer when you decide to upgrade your hardware.

    While some here may say that it's okay to violate Microsoft's EULA and the law, I don't. I prefer to not inject unnecessary complications into my life. "Doing the right thing" always has a better payoff.
     
  17. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    All running machines will update, during evaluation, during rearm...whatever. Licenses or even activation has nothing to do with updating.

    Unlicensed machines eventuall won't boot up.


    Microsoft Says Windows 7 Install Workaround Is Legal
     
  18. A machine that Windows Genuine Advantage software says is illegal certainly is a running machine. Do you know what happens when you try to use Windows Update on such a machine?

    It doesn't work.

    Your "whatever" presents certain problems. I'm surprised that "an expert" like you, as you called yourself above, doesn't qualify your statement by warning people about those problems.

    Oh, and if you rearm Windows 7, you'll be told that you that have to reinstall it. I prefer to avoid the hassles that following your advice would cause.
     
  19. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    You are right about that. A machine that is not activated doesn't work when the evaluation period runs out... you definitely can NOT update an OS that refuses to startup.



    You still want to make everything personal even after being warned and having 2 of your threads CLOSED.

    I can't find even ONE of your messages helping anyone to try to solve a problem.

    We have a total opposite view of the value of this forum.

    Would you pleas just consider using your talents to help someone?
     
  20. tblount

    tblount New Member

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    Using the workaround to do a clean install from a Windows 7 Upgrade... Here is a list of the first 20 links that Google finds: There is another page after this one.
     

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