Upgrading PSU

Discussion in 'Windows 10 Hardware' started by H4X0R46, Aug 29, 2016.

  1. H4X0R46

    H4X0R46 Active Member

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    Cool thanks for your input man! I just wanna be %100 sure before blowing cash. What would you personally recommend? Getting a better AMD CPU, or getting a new mobo and an Intel CPU? Price for power in mind.
     
  2. nmsuk

    nmsuk Windows Forum Admin
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    I wait for zen and then upgrade, for now that cpu will do fine at gaming. Save your money for a few months and then go AM4 Zen and DDR4.
     
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  3. H4X0R46

    H4X0R46 Active Member

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    Cool! Thanks! So far my current CPU (AMD FX-6300) has been mostly solid for MOST games out there today (stumbles on Fallout 4, but could be because of my GPU more than anything.) but just looking at my options and you guys are a great resource!
     
  4. William B

    William B Active Member

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    The most important thing is that you have decent playable framerates.
     
  5. H4X0R46

    H4X0R46 Active Member

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    I do in most games. Some newer games are too heavy, fallout 4 is one, and dying light I have to play on lowest settings with 1280x720 resolution. But it runs well with most games out there.
     
  6. William B

    William B Active Member

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    What you're going to want is something like a GTX 960 or R9 280 that will fix the 1280*720 issue playing on low settings, and you will want a good quality 550-650W power supply. I don't recommend upgrading to an FX 8320 on a motherboard that only has 4.1 power phasing on the mosfets. If you go the way of the GTX 960 (if you can find one for a good price now), all you would need is a good 500 watt unit, however my recommendation is something like a nice eVGA 600-650W PSU, and a GTX 960 or R9 280/380.
     
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  7. nmsuk

    nmsuk Windows Forum Admin
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    Just noticed the full spec, whats letting you down is that R7 250. The cpu is fine for gaming but that card is more for htpc use than gaming.
     
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  8. H4X0R46

    H4X0R46 Active Member

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    So I've been doing some reading and research, and I'm looking at a power supply that says it has an eps connector for cpu, but the connector on my board is atx12v. Can I use an eps connector in an atx12v slot without issue?

    Also, what connector do fans and lights usually use? I have lights in my current setup as well. Is it just normal 4 pin peripheral cables or what are they? Thanks

    EDIT: I did some more reading and correct me if I'm wrong, the fans are plugged into the board and I won't even have to mess with them when changing the psu right? I would also assume the lights are the same thing, I could leave those alone as they get power from the board and not directly to the psu?
     
    #28 H4X0R46, Sep 21, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2016
  9. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Personally, I would go with a higher wattage PSU even if you don't change out your GPU card, new Mobo, and or new CPU chip. I run an 8-year old Dell Studio540 OEM desktop PC which came with a 360Watt PSU generic. I replaced it with an awesome Seasonic Series 750W 80+Gold PSU a couple of years ago when the factory PSU went legs up. I've got all factory stuff in there except an additional SATA hard drive for clone image backup. Putting in this PSU reduced all kinds of weird problems going back to W7 I had with my computer; especially assorted BSODs and so forth. Going to a really good high-end PSU can really provide increased stability to your PC regardless of your components.:up: My Dell is a Quad-Core 8200 CPU, quite fast for it's day, but it's not built for gaming which I don't do, but it totally rejuvenated my system from the day I installed it. For around $135, it's the best money I ever spent on this computer:up:. Here's an article I really like that gives you lots of reasons why you should upgrade your PC to a higher wattage than was mentioned here and a really informative source on the different design aspects of PSUs: Power Supply Information and Selection - Tech Support Forum.

    Hope that proves useful information to you.:cool:
    <<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
     

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