Windows 10 Wi-Fi speed is extremely slow since installing Windows 10

Garuna93

Member
I recently formatted my laptop which was running Windows 10 to re-install it since i didn't do a clean install the first time and was hence facing some issues.I've now installed Windows 10 pro x64 version on my Vaio laptop.

However soon after installing i noticed that the wi-fi speed was extremely slow.Windows update took forever and eventually failed.I don't have the fastest internet connection (2 Mbps) but the speeds i'm getting are less than 10KBps.Windows update progresses 1% in around an hour.Apps from windows store take even longer.

I tried using a third party software to upgrade my drivers since windows update was taking ages and that software too suffered from the same speed.I thought that some background application might be leeching the speed so i closed windows update (stopped the windows update service),made sure no apps were being downloaded in the windows store and made sure no optional language packs were being downloaded however the result was the same.

It's not an issue with my Wi-Fi since i'm getting good speed on all other devices including other Windows 10 devices.I've tried several things but i'm now at my wit's end.Here's what i've tried so far :

1. Re-installed the Broadcom driver for Wi-Fi.
2. Formatted the PC and re-install Windows.
3. Disabled location services.
4. Disabled updates from more than one place under windows update.
5. Changing several wi-fi properties.

What do you recommend?
 

Neemobeer

Principal Cybersecurity Architect
Staff member
I'd first, on a different computer download the most current wireless driver for your device from Sony. If that doesn't work log into your router and look at the wireless security in use. If you're using AES switch to TKIP and see if that resolves the issue. If it works get all of the Windows updates and the drivers updated then try switching back. AES is more secure than TKIP.
 

Garuna93

Member
I'd first, on a different computer download the most current wireless driver for your device from Sony. If that doesn't work log into your router and look at the wireless security in use. If you're using AES switch to TKIP and see if that resolves the issue. If it works get all of the Windows updates and the drivers updated then try switching back. AES is more secure than TKIP.

I tried switching from AES to TKIP,it didn't do anything.I had backed up a few drivers before formatting,the wireless driver being one of them.I installed this driver and the result was still the same.I don't think it's a driver issue.
 

Neemobeer

Principal Cybersecurity Architect
Staff member
Well you could try downloading a live linux distro such as Ubuntu and boot into that and test the wireless speed. If it's still poor then you could have a hardware problem or potentially an antenna wire came loose.
 

BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
That's a good idea neem.

If you are getting close to your 2Mbps with Ubuntu or other Linux distro, your W10 is probably scrambled (you scan for viruses yet? many viruses attack Wi-Fi or make it useless :eek:). Another easy fix you can do without taking the laptop apart is to buy a good quality USB Wi-Fi adapter that will plug into the Vaio's usb port. We suggest that you do another W10 Clean Install (after backing up all your Personal Data to external media first!) and plug in the new USB Wi-Fi adapter. If the 2Mbps d/l speed comes back; your internal WLAN card (inside the laptop) is fried and won't work anymore.:waah: Replacing can be a big job and can cost up to $200 since laptop disassembly is often required.:waah: The USB Wi-Fi adapter from Cisco/Linksys or Netgear runs $35-$45 US; a much cheaper solution.:encouragement:

If your speed is still slow with Ubuntu boot, chances are your WLAN card has failed and the above remedies should fix it;:up: the cheaper of the 2 solutions being the low-cost plug-in USB Wi-Fi adapters readily available online or in most retail computer chain stores (Best Buy or Staples).

<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
 

Neemobeer

Principal Cybersecurity Architect
Staff member
The internal WLAN cards are almost always easy to access from panels on the back and should only run $30-50.
 

BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
Not so much anymore; most all the laptops since W8 came out have done away with that easy-access port to the WLAN card, the RAM sticks, and even the Hard Drive and the Battery!:eek: I saw this about 3 years ago when one of our Computer Club members brought in a new W8 Dell laptop; his battery stopped charging and he wanted to replace it (or at least test it). And you couldn't get at it! It was inside the bottom case; no access port covers whatsoever!:headache: I gave him my Card and told him I could get it out in a couple of days and test his battery and let him know if it needed replacing and offered to do that for him. He never called me. So, he either took it to another Tech or Repair Shop or tossed it in the trash. That actually happens more than you would think--I've found several discarded laptops in our dumpsters, and there is something simple wrong with them like a battery that they can't get to, or a missing AC charger. Internal WLAN cards are about half what you said on ebay; about $10-$20 or so for the older laptops I have ordered in the last 5 years or so. If OP has one of these laptops, he might want to consider taking it to a licensed Computer Tech and paying him to replace the WLAN card--otherwise he can DIY it and just use the plug-in USB Wi-Fi adapter as mentioned; no trip to the Repair Shop would be necessary. So, in most cases on these newer laptops without access panels, it's a $100+ repair; <$20 for the part, and at least $80-$160 in labor to disassemble the laptop case, replace the part, and put it all back together in working order.

BBJ
 

Garuna93

Member
That's a good idea neem.

If you are getting close to your 2Mbps with Ubuntu or other Linux distro, your W10 is probably scrambled (you scan for viruses yet? many viruses attack Wi-Fi or make it useless :eek:). Another easy fix you can do without taking the laptop apart is to buy a good quality USB Wi-Fi adapter that will plug into the Vaio's usb port. We suggest that you do another W10 Clean Install (after backing up all your Personal Data to external media first!) and plug in the new USB Wi-Fi adapter. If the 2Mbps d/l speed comes back; your internal WLAN card (inside the laptop) is fried and won't work anymore.:waah: Replacing can be a big job and can cost up to $200 since laptop disassembly is often required.:waah: The USB Wi-Fi adapter from Cisco/Linksys or Netgear runs $35-$45 US; a much cheaper solution.:encouragement:

If your speed is still slow with Ubuntu boot, chances are your WLAN card has failed and the above remedies should fix it;:up: the cheaper of the 2 solutions being the low-cost plug-in USB Wi-Fi adapters readily available online or in most retail computer chain stores (Best Buy or Staples).

<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>

I previously had an older build of Windows 10 installed on my laptop and the Wi-Fi worked fine.If there was a virus or if the WLAN card was fried,wouldn't the Wi-Fi not work at all?I'm still able to connect to the internet but the speed is really low.I'll try getting my hands on another windows installation and installing it.
 

BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
Hi Garuna,
I understand what you're saying. Answer to your first question is "No", not necessarily. Sometimes, spyware viruses will just hinder an Internet Wi-Fi connection, or an Internet wired connection. Usually what happens is the spyware virus is contained within a small program or app on your computer such as Yahoo or IOBIT toolbars, for example. During your normal maintenance activity, you see those programs there and you don't remember installing them or you just are no longer using them; and you remove them--and BAM!! you've just launched a spyware virus which hinders your Internet by deleting critical files from the Windows networking system file library.:eek: I know this since I've removed infected programs before, and had done my speedtest.net speedtesting on them BEFORE I deleted them. Internet Wi-Fi/wired didn't stop working, the speed just throttled way back like yours did.:waah: Of course, I've seen the complete Internet-disabled thing where you get no Internet whatsoever on just the Wi-Fi or just the Wired Ethernet connection (cable) or sometimes BOTH! :zoned:

That beings said, you're assumption is faulty. Proceeding with the next logical step, you're going to reinstall W10, and if you do it correctly and by correctly I mean you must DELETE & FORMAT ALL PARTITIONS on your C: bootdrive; otherwise you may not remove all viruses, especially the hidden ones such as Rootkits & Bootkits. This should fix the problem. :up:

If it doesn't, I'm going to replay and add to the suggestions we made to you already which you must take to fix the problem:

1.) Make sure to BACKUP ALL PERSONAL DATA FROM THIS COMPUTER PRIOR TO ATTEMPTING FURTHER HARDWARE TESTING OR SOFTWARE REPAIRS IN ORDER TO AVOID IRRETRIEVABLE DATA LOSS!!!
2.) CAUTION: Make certain prior to any of the troubleshooting or testing or repairs are done TO PHYSICALLY DISCONNECT OR REMOVE ANY AND ALL SECONDARY INTERNAL OR EXTERNAL HARD DRIVES FROM YOUR MOTHERBOARD AND POWER SUPPLY!! IF YOU DON'T DO THIS YOU MAY EXPERIENCE INDETERMINATE OR UNEXPECTED RESULTS!!
3.) Take our suggestion of creating a Ubuntu or Mint or other Linux free distro in bootable form (DVD or USB) and boot your computer from the media by changing your Boot Preference in your computer's BIOS. Connect to the Internet and repeat your speedtest. If your speed comes back to where it's supposed to be (as your other devices are doing), most likely your W10 install has a problem or perhaps your W10 source media for the new version of W10 you installed.:andwhat: Re-download the source media (ISO file)for W10 from here: Download Windows 10 and reinstall your W10 from bootable media using the Microsoft MCT (Media Creation Tool) on this link's web page. This should fix the problem, assuming no other hardware failures such as a bad RAM Stick or Hard drive.:up:
4.) If after testing with the Linux bootable media in STEP #3 above fails, and your Internet speed is still slow or doesn't work at all (either on Wi-Fi or Wired Internet), then it's not the fault of your current or newly attempted W10, and is clearly a hardware issue. At this point you will need to conduct comprehensive hardware testing to determine if your WLAN card has actually failed or not. Take a look at my excellent step-by-step free TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE available here to do this: Windows 10 - Unclickable Task Bar
After completing the hardware testing, and you can achieve a pass on all RAM STICKS and your HARD DRIVE, you will have narrowed down your suspected hardware failure to your WLAN card or your Motherboard. Since Motherboard replacements can be from $80-$1,500 US depending on what part of the world you live in, it makes sense to test and or replace the WLAN card first.:) See next item for this.
5.) If Step #4 still shows reduced or inoperable Wi-Fi, it's easiest to simply purchase an external USB plug-in adapter for $35-$50 US that is a name brand manufacturer such as Cisco/Linkys or Netgear. [do not use other brands that are cheaper such as D-link or TP-link; as those are not reliable for testing purposes and their drivers are unreliable and can scramble your W10!:noway:]. Retest your speed with your bootable Linux media or with the W10 build. If your speed comes back, your WLAN card has failed and must be replaced!:waah: Prices for the part vary as neemo and I stated; but should be under $50 US. This usually is a $125-$200 US repair price due to the large amount of labor time required to replace the WLAN card as I mentioned in my last post. If you have a laptop with an access port, you could buy the part yourself and do the repair in about an hour for well under $100.;)

6.) If you are hesitant about replacing the WLAN card yourself, or you have one of the many newer laptops where there is no Easy-Button access port to the WLAN card slot, you can pay a licensed Computer Tech to replace this for you as in Step #5 above. Or of course, you could simply leave the EXTERNAL USB WI-FI ADAPTER your purchased, in the Vaio laptop's USB port and simply disable the internal WLAN card in your laptop's BIOS.:thumbs_up: Lots of my customers decide to do this when I inform them of the repair cost to replace the internal WLAN card in their laptops.;)
**NOTE: Of course, if you ever have to take your laptop with you outside of your home and need Wi-Fi you'll need to remember to take your USB Wi-Fi adapter along with the laptop. For people who transport their laptops in a Case, this often means unplugging your USB Wi-Fi dongle from the laptop, and throwing it into a zippered compartment of the laptop Case so you don't forget it! Otherwise no Wi-Fi when you get to where you're going like work, friend's house, school, etc. and no Wi-Fi adapter, no Internet!

If you've spent the time to read this entire post, please do not feel that you have to do all of this or even any of it. Your problem of slowed-down Internet is quite ubiquitous, and we are seeing this a lot, so not only did I write it for you, but for all of our other current and future forum users here at WF (Windows Forum). I do this a lot, as you can see by the extensive TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE I referred you to above. Hardware testing is the most difficult thing for people to do on their own at home, especially for people with limited computer skills. You don't appear to be in that category. However, it's like getting a book from the library and trying to fix your own leaky sink or toilet. Maybe 1 in a 100 can do it the first time without ever having done it before--assuming they own or buy the correct tools to do the repair.:scratch:

Most of the tools we recommend here are very low-cost, varying from a $0.20 US DVD blank disc to a $7-$15 US blank USB flash drive. All the software we recommend is mostly free; some will cost a bit over $25, but that's only if you decide to keep it and like it. But, it's not mandatory to buy it. Many of us here like to use "try-it-before-you-buy-it" software tools.:teeth:


Thanks for reading my Post and let us know how you get on.
Best of luck to you,:encouragement::clover:


<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>> :usa:
 
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ragnarok1968

Well-Known Member
BigBeardJedi- in the network speed category, I forget the name of it, set the setting to "1500" some don't come that way by default.
 

Neemobeer

Principal Cybersecurity Architect
Staff member
No not really. If data is over the MTU which it almost always is anyways the data will be fragmented and there is some overhead on the receiving to reassembled the data but that is normal. QoS is what is used to throttle traffic.
 
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