Canon printer disconnecting from the network

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Networking' started by helen99, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. helen99

    helen99 New Member

    Sep 14, 2014
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    I just changed my DLS modem and my network printer stopped working correctly, its a canon image runner 2010 and it has a static IP. I turn on the computers and the printer it will work for 2 to 3hours and then it will start to drop the network connection, all my computers have static IP addresses
  2. helpifIcan

    helpifIcan Extraordinary Member

    Jun 20, 2009
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    Maybe a bad new modem especially if it was working OK prior to the change. Sometimes even new can have faults.
  3. patcooke

    patcooke Microsoft MVP
    Staff Member Premium Supporter Microsoft MVP

    May 16, 2010
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    Do you have a particular reason for using static IP's? You may find you are suffering from some addressing conflicts - I would use DHCP unless there is some over-riding reason not to. If you must then check out the range of static addresses you are using and configure the router to ensure that there is no overlap between DHCP reservations and static assigned addresses.
  4. Spirit Wolfe

    Spirit Wolfe Well-Known Member

    Mar 14, 2014
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    I agree with Pat. It is far less complicated to use DHCP and let the router do it thing. However, I like static IP addressing for peripherals. I use static IP addressing for my printer. I have a network printer (a Brother MFC 9330CDW) that I designate a static IP address to only because of the many devices that I want to have access to that peripheral. Since my network is small I can easily remember which (static) IP address my printer (for example) is on in case of trouble shooting. I keep my non-peripheral devices set to use DHCP but I bind my MAC addresses to a specific IP address that is set in my router table, rather the other way round. This way I can leave my notebooks and tablets and mobile cell phones set to automatically connect and find an IP address of my choosing rather than a random one that DHCP chooses.

    Binding the MAC addresses of each device that is connected to my network I allow each device that connects to meander ("automatically" speaking that is) to the IP address of my choosing instead of specifically designating one (static IP) within the parameters of my device's network cards (wireless or cable). I then can leave a much narrower IP availability (scope) for guests to connect to my network as I can identify them much quicker because they will have an expired time limit notification stamp next to their MAC and IP address they are utilizing while in my home. The binded ones allows for a "never" or an unlimited time notification expiration period.

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