Desperate Actions

#1
M$ has stopped selling retail copies of Windows 7. They know that companies don't want that Windows H8 crap and they want to try to force people hands by ending support for XP. Do they really think companies are going to switch to H8? I'm thinking you start seeing Apple and Android sales going up.

http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/microsoft-ends-windows-7-retail-sales/
 


seekermeister

Honorable Member
#2
Good reason to protect the copies and licenses for W7 that one already has, but there are still a lot of W7 software available on the net.
 


Pauli

Extraordinary Member
Premium Supporter
#3
Yet another mistake by Microsoft. One was when they tried to force companies to go from Win 98 to XP, and several companies refused. Next, Microsoft was forced to continue security support for XP with five years, by customer demand. And now, they seem to want to stop Windows 7 sales at October 30, 2013, when the End of mainstream support is January 13, 2015 and End of extended support is January 14, 2020.

Seems like they want to kill their own products? Dubious policy. I still haven't figured out why no true and strong competition hasn't appeared.

Well, I'll stick to the public promise of extended support til 2020. They are obliged.
 


Mike

Windows Forum Admin
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#4
Yet another mistake by Microsoft. One was when they tried to force companies to go from Win 98 to XP, and several companies refused. Next, Microsoft was forced to continue security support for XP with five years, by customer demand. And now, they seem to want to stop Windows 7 sales at October 30, 2013, when the End of mainstream support is January 13, 2015 and End of extended support is January 14, 2020.

Seems like they want to kill their own products? Dubious policy. I still haven't figured out why no true and strong competition hasn't appeared.

Well, I'll stick to the public promise of extended support til 2020. They are obliged.
This is a policy known as forced obsoletion or planned obsoletion which has been postulated by those who see Microsoft as unrivalled in the desktop marketplace. This "planned obsolescence" may change if other corporations once again begin to release competing operating systems with cross-platform interoperability. Other factors may also be at work, such as the feasibility of their engineering team supporting multiple versions of what are essentially the same kernel on a monthly basis.
 


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