how to do repair install after SP1 installed

slsmvs

Honorable Member
#1
My boot hard drive went bad according to S.M.A.R.T., so I replaced it after doing a full disk copy. The new drive works fine and everything works BUT there was damage to some Windows (Win 7 Pro 64 bit) files over an unknown period of time, so Windows Restore won't help. I have SP1 installed, so my original install DVD does not work for a repair install.

Is there a way short of full purchase to get an install disc that supports SP1? Any other ideas to identify and replace corrupted or missing files?
 


patcooke

Microsoft MVP
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#2
If you think it's a syStem file problem try running the system file checker:

goto programs, accessories, right click on command prompt and run as administrator. Enter the command:

sfc /scannow
 


slsmvs

Honorable Member
#3
Thanks, Pat. that little beast moved a lot of files. I knew there had to be something like that, just didn't know its name.

I'll consider the incident closed for now.

Steve
 


Joe S

Excellent Member
#4
If that doesn't work you can slipstream SP1 into an Install disk. If you want to try that post back. I used to do it for XP.
Joe
 


patcooke

Microsoft MVP
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#5
Thanks for the feedback.
 


slsmvs

Honorable Member
#6
Joe,

Although things look OK for now, I'd like to have the slipstream process ready to go. Could you let me know how it is done?

Thanks,

Steve

If that doesn't work you can slipstream SP1 into an Install disk. If you want to try that post back. I used to do it for XP.
Joe
 


patcooke

Microsoft MVP
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#7
Slipstreaming is a useful technique for merging major updates into their parent op sys to enable a single install which will simultaneously install the two and it is well documented all over the net - just google it. It will however result in a complete clean install of the op sys requiring a full reinstall of drivers, other updates, customisation, configuration and recovery of any user data stored on the system drive (which is not good practice anyway). If you now have a clean reliable system with all your drivers etc installed you might like to consider adopting and regular routine of system imaging to create a single image of the system drive incorporating all drivers, apps etc from which you can run a complete recovery in minutes. Thereare many packages around to do this - one I use is Acronis True Image which has a full working trial download available, another is Clonezilla which is free to name just two. I personally would not run a PC without regular system imaging which enables recovery from a host of problems including bad driver updates, application installs, malware infections, hard drive failure . . .
 


Joe S

Excellent Member
#8
Usually for slipstreaming you need a clean disk retail or OEM not the system restore disks you can create from an Image. I've experimented with RT Seven Lite RT Seven Lite - Downloads It's pretty simple to go through You would also need the standalone SP1 or CD and plenty of free space. There is also VLite vLite - MSFN Forum something else you would need is something to test the finished product. VMware Player is free VMware Player 3.0 and Virtual Box Downloads - VirtualBox I like the RT Seven and VMware Player better. You need to use care with these if you get into removing "unneeded apps" from Windows. I got involved with this on XP. On XP there were some people that made monthly update packs with all the needed updates available I haven't seen the same for Windows 7 yet. It's nice to a clean install and not have to take a lot of time downloading from MS update and rebooting over and over. On XP I found if your disk was very far out of date you couldn't do a Repair Install. You'll need good burning software if you make a DVD something like IMGburn The Official ImgBurn Website and keep the burn speed at a max of 4X . When you test on virtual PC just don't activate and delete when finished. If you want to get really involved you can get into unattended install. Basically add and edit some files and it will fully load without any stops.
Joe
 


This website is not affiliated, owned, or endorsed by Microsoft Corporation. It is a member of the Microsoft Partner Program.