my board or Windows-7

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by sammytruck, May 29, 2015.

  1. sammytruck

    sammytruck Well-Known Member

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    I have had several times in the last while where my system 2/3's freezes up. Can't get back to the desktop just after minutes, but still able to reboot.

    Wondering if it is this B75M-D3H Gigabyte board..?
     
  2. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Hi Sammytruck,
    freezing can be attributed to a number of things although principally heat is one of the major causes. Can you post when the freezes happen? Is it when you do something particular like gaming or just random?
    Check your temps using an app such as this:
    http://www.hwinfo.com/

    Check your temps at various points. Alt-Tab out of games to quickly check your temps as often your temps can be higher when gaming than when using a stress test so it's important to check.
     
  3. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    System lock ups can be caused by many things but I agree, it is probably not the board - unless it is covered in a layer of heat-trapping dust. Other common causes are a failing power supply, corrupt system files, and malware.
     
  4. dikbozo

    dikbozo Well-Known Member

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    I have seen intermittent behavior like you describe caused by wonky SATA controllers but most likely by power supply age and/or condition. Overclocking can cause things to go odd, as well.

    I would pull out every extra thing beyond boot drive, mouse, keyboard and monitor, including Bluetooth, wifi and LAN to eliminate everything but the basics. Should you have a PSU tester or can borrow one, please use it. After pulling things apart, try each extra piece one at a time to try to determine where the problem reappears. Good luck.
     
  5. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Good point about overclocking. If you have modified your system timings, I recommend you reset your BIOS and go back to the default clocks until this is resolved.
     
  6. sammytruck

    sammytruck Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I'm late in my response.

    The problem seemed to be in my ram. The board had my 16-gigs of ram clocked at 1.5 volts. The ram is actually 1.65 volts. Once I clicked on custom, then profile1, it automatically went to 1.65 volts.

    Now why couldn't Gigabyte figure that out in the first place......
     
  7. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Is that RAM listed on that motherboard's QVL?
     
  8. sammytruck

    sammytruck Well-Known Member

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    You're right my module p/n numbers are different than suggested. Still works fine now.
     
  9. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    Good.

    My point about the RAM QVL is there is are just too many RAM makers producing too many RAM models for motherboard makers to test them all. It would be way too expensive and those costs, naturally, would have to be passed on to us consumers.

    Because there are so many, board makers (not just Gigabyte) should not be expected to figure all that out. So they test a representative sampling of what's out there.

    We don't have to buy listed RAM, but we do have to buy RAM with the same specs as listed RAM to ensure compatibility. This is why in your motherboard manual, it says to refer to the motherboard's website for a list of supported RAM (page 8).

    Note for CPUs, it is different. Because motherboards support either Intel or AMD CPUs, and because the chipsets on the motherboards support small families of CPUs within either Intel or AMD, there are only a relatively few number of CPUs from one maker only the board supports, so the motherboard makers can test them all. So you do need to buy a listed CPU.
     

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