Windows 8 Newest version of Windows 8

Discussion in 'Live RSS Feeds' started by PattiChati, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    I have Windows 8 and know they are coming out with an update or new version of it - hopefully to make it less annoying and more like Windows 7. Do you know if the people who already have windows 8 will get this upgrade for free? When will we know when the finished version is available and not just the beta version?
     
  2. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    Yep it will be free to people already having Windows 8 installed.
    The scheduled release to manufacturer (RTM) is still set for late August. I would expect the General Availability (GA) release to follow pretty promptly after. Although Microsoft does seem to love the Month of October so that would be my best guess right now.
     
  3. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    Do you think this update will allow windows 8 to be more user friendly? Of course, now that I am learning how to work around Windows 8 quirks, I will have to learn all over again!!!!
     
  4. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    Yes, but only a bit. There are some changes in the interface you may like but for the most part they are relatively small tweaks, like the return of the "Start Button" but with no underlying legacy start menu.
    The key to getting around Windows 8 or 8.1 for that matter is to make the start screen your own. Get rid of most of the crap that comes stock in that interface and add the stuff you use daily, group them and name the groups and make it work for you the way you want it to.
    And learning a few handy shortcut keyboard combos involving the Windows Logo Key to pop around like a pro.
    The changes regarding windows 8.1 as well as handy keyboard shortcuts are pretty well documented all over the internet so I won't bother enumerating them here, just Google for that minutiae
     
  5. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    Mainly I don't like that when I go somewhere it always takes me back to the "tile" page and none of those tiles take me back to my actual sites. Like "mail" for instance doesn't take me to my firefox yahoo page and photos takes me to their large area of photos, instead of my own personal "pictures" file. I do all of that now with pinning it all to my taskbar. I mainly don't use the tile page at all. I have googled it, but still don't know how to make the tile "photos" to be my picture folder - as an example. There are also so many tiles I have no use for at all! There is probably a way to customize it all, I just haven't had the time to figure it out. Do you have a particular website that shows me how to do these things? When I google it, there are so many places and so much advice, it is too overwhelming and you never know what changes will louse up your computer.
    I have a brand new laptop, so don't don't want to "crimp it's style" so to say.
     
  6. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    If there are tiles on your start screen (page) that you do not want or use, simply right click and select "unpin from start"
    If you want your "My Pictures" folder on your start screen simply browse to it in file explorer, right click and select "pin to start"
    Simple and easy.
    If you unpin something and want to pin it back you can either browse to the exe or simply grab it from all apps by right clicking and empty area of your start screen and selecting "all apps" at the bottom.

    This is simple Gieco caveman could do it stuff and will not cause problems with your computer. You can make the start screen your own and in the doing maybe clean up your taskbar some.
     
  7. Mitchell_A

    Mitchell_A Excellent Member

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    if you're interested in previewing the 8.1 update, it's publicly available here. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-ca/windows-8/preview-download

    The only cache is you have to do a clean installation so it can be hard to justify.(They have a version which is distributed as an in-place upgrade via the Windows Store, but I wouldn't recommend it from my own personal experience.

    It brings lots of small improvements as Trouble mentioned, but most of them are the top complaints people have had with Windows 8.
     
  8. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    Ok, that was easy. Is there anyway to make it a large colorful icon like the other major ones?
     
  9. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    I don't want to have to do a clean install, that's nuts. Why would you not do the in-place upgrade? It would still be free that way, wouldn't it?
     
  10. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
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    It is and will be available from the Windows Store. I agree with you, that a clean install is an absolute harbinger of doom for both myself and many others. I have done it so many times out of necessity, for work, for testing, and for friends and family, that preserving the data is a total nightmare. However, from a technical standpoint, it is the right answer.

    While Microsoft has gotten better at their upgrades, normally, people in IT have always suggested never doing an upgrade and always going the route of clean install whenever possible. For every version of Windows, this has very much been the case. And there is a good reason for this.

    It almost always takes longer to do the upgrade rather than the clean install, but even if you have to migrate data, you are less likely to experience overhead as you could with the upgrade. You can upgrade all the way from Windows XP to Windows 8, and check it out, I've actually done it:



    The problem is that, over the long term, you have a huge amount of unused overhead files, simply due to human error and lack of quality control when each successive version is installed. No one writing the upgrade path from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 could possibly be thinking or have any knowledge that, in the future, people will be upgrading from Windows 8.1 to "Windows 12" (or something). They may be vaguely aware of it, but they have no idea how that system will operate. When you run a business, you can't just base every development decision on what may happen in the future. And historically, tech companies have focused the vast majority of their resources on developing the software itself, and direct relatively few resources to the installer/uninstaller. This is simply a matter of working with a project that is usually compartmentalized, has a budget, timetables, and milestone goals.

    On a computer that upgraded from Windows XP to Windows Vista to Windows 7, and then to Windows 8, we are talking about gigabytes of operating system files that are no longer in use, and extremely difficult to identify; remnants of older stuff.

    If you're using Windows 8, you'll probably be able to do the in place upgrade just fine. It will always be "cleaner" to do a clean install. For some people, the upgrade process will take significantly longer than a fresh install of 8.1 would. However, if you want to avoid the doomsday-type situation of having to reinstall all your programs, reintegrate your settings and files, this is probably the best option for the average user.

    While a lot of people may be assuming Windows 8.1 is like a service pack, it is not. Many operating system files are going to be changed here, and specifically, if you look at the BuildLabEx number for Windows 8 its:

    9200.16628.amd64fre.win8_gdr.130531-1504

    For Windows 8.1 Preview it is:

    9431.0.amd64fre.winmain_bluemp.130615-1214

    That means by this summer, they had probably recompiled the kernel tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of times. When in development, they use this type of methodology to test the operating system against any possible interaction that could stall the kernel with algorithms that test every possible user interaction within the system.

    Not to get off topic, but the last update to Windows that replaced the kernel itself was Windows Vista Service Pack 1. I think 8.1 will not be much of a feature pack or service pack as much as it will be an enhancement that addresses many long standing concerns. For me, however, lots of IT buzzwords like "in-place upgrade" don't make any sense. That kind of title suggests that files are simply being copied over and you are good to go. With an upgrade situation as big as Windows has become, hundreds of thousands of files will not just be copied over, but there will be numerous alterations in the code to upgrade to the new platform. Even the most astute computer scientists do not known what proprietary changes are being made when these types of upgrades happen.

    This is why from a technical perspective, it is always best to do a clean install, plain and simple. From a utilitarian perspective and a end-user perspective, a quick upgrade is always going to be desired. I, for one, do recommend, however, that if you're using the release preview (which is really a beta or release candidate... designed for paying customers to beta test; another example of buzzwords), you should really consider doing a clean install. Yes, there will likely be a simple upgrade mechanism, and if you can handle that, go for it , but these types of changes, without a clean install, cause unpredictability for troubleshooting when the system breaks down.

    In any method of diagnosis, we try to rule out X. We cannot prove Y, so we must rule out X. So when we get down to the nuts and bolts of whats happening here to a system, especially using process of elimination, if get backed into a corner, we can't necessarily rule out the upgrade itself, especially if its recent. "8.1 Preview had been installed for some time" Etc.

    By default, we hope for the best that most upgrades will be as stable as the one Microsoft created from Windows 7 to Windows 8, but that is not always the case. There is a small chance some upgrade scenarios for certain types of hardware will not be supported or cause major problems. Even if this is obscure hardware that is, seemingly, not used much, imagine the nightmare when it comes to fruition that this hardware is used by a hundred thousand businesses around the world. This type of scenario has happened before, in the past, and has caused hours of waste in troubleshooting, diagnosis, and support.

    We see how this also happened in the transition between Windows XP and Windows Vista, and how a lot of systems were upgraded even though they failed to perform up to the manufacturer's intended specifications. Even though, in many instances, we know that a lot of people who should have upgraded didn't, and a lot of people who should never have upgraded did. So these issues can get quite complex exactly because there are an enormous number of variables that cannot all be accounted for in any given system or operation.
     
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  11. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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  12. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    It seems like an awful lot of trouble if the upgrade isn't all that great. All I would want is for the tiling aspect to be better, but it certainly isn't worth a clean install, nor worth the possibility of lousing your computer up. I'm not sure what the whoopdedoo of the "start" button is. I guess I haven't missed it.
    I think I will stick with what I have. I had a tech come out for a mere $200 to set me up with my new laptop just a few months ago, I don't think I care to invest more at this point when everything is working. If it ain't broke.....don't fix it!
     
  13. PhyllisColeman

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    though the post is long enough yet has a content of worth this is why i have gone through the full and get the most about the latest launch of the Win version
     
  14. goodintentions

    goodintentions Active Member

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    There is a way for you to permanently kill the screen with the tiles. Would you like me to tell you how?
     
  15. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    Sure, but then how would i get to my programs and files
     
  16. goodintentions

    goodintentions Active Member

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    You can install classic she'll and get the start emu back. After killing the start screen and installing the start menu, it will be almost like win7 again. Think about it and tell me if you still want this.
     
  17. PattiChati

    PattiChati Active Member

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    I tried classic shell and it goofed up my computer and i uninstalled it. Windows 8.1 or whatever they are calling it should come out soon and we can upgrade for free. So I hope they have that one working better. To me, Windows 8 is a step back from Windows 7. Thanks.
     
  18. goodintentions

    goodintentions Active Member

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    Hehe, you think so?

    To me, 8 is 10 times better than 7. I'm a full time engineer and part time computer programmer. I have half a dozen apps in the winstore.

    I really think 8-like interface is the way of the future. My work flow has been much better ever since I upgraded to 8.

    Although I can see why some people might not like 8 as much as 7. As a joke, a number of years ago I wrote a small program that permanently hide the taskbar. I sent the small app to a couple of my friends. What I didn't expect was they each sent that app to their friends. And before I know it, there were dozens of panicked people completely lost without their taskbar. Fearing that they might send me to guantanamo bay, I quickly wrote a script and brought back the taskbar.

    I think 8 is much much easier to work with. But I can see why some people don't think this way.
     
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