Official Download Is Tied To One Machine?

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by abrogard, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. abrogard

    abrogard Active Member

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    I have an installation of win7 Ultimate x64 that is going wobbly. So I want to run repair on it. But I can't find the original disks.

    found the microsoft site where I can download a win7 ISO if I give them the key from that machine.

    That's fine. And I'll do it. But just wonder - that will be my validated key they're asking for so does that mean that the ISO I download will be good only for that machine? If I want to cover my other machines I need a downloaded ISO for each different machine ?

    Or the one ISO will serve as repair disk, recover, reinstall, whatever, for any matching (7 Ult, x64) install?

    Oh, yes, I've got another one, too: what about if the machine dies before I can rescue it?

    With a crashed motherboard? How can I do a reinstall on another board - these validations tie the software to the hardware, don't they?
     
    #1 abrogard, Aug 10, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2016
  2. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    If you're download the ISO from Microsoft the key just validates that you have a valid Windows install. The ISO isn't tied to anything. You can download the ISO from any reputable site legally. The key is what is important and can cause legal concerns if received from a site without purchase. You can also create a repair disc from anyones Windows 7 or higher computer legally
     
  3. abrogard

    abrogard Active Member

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    Well thanks for that. I'll try it and see.
    A mate reckons if my crook machine goes down and I decide to scrap that mobo, which I well might do because though it is supposedly a good one it's been giving us unexplained freezes and crashes for months now, I need to ring MS to get them to release that key from that machine so's I can use it elsewhere.
    The thought of that's had me going around all our machines writing down the keys just in case. I hadn't realised validation simply ties a key to a certain set of hardware...
     
  4. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    BSODs and freezes are 90% of the time caused by drivers. If you follow the "How to ask for BSOD help" posts we can diagnose your crashes.
     
  5. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    >>>Yes, you're correct! However, the W7 ISO created install media is Generic, and that means that it won't have the required drivers for the specific internal devices in a new or different Motherboard. That means you have to go the support website of your computer maker or your Mobo manufacturer and download all the drivers one at a time from their website. This process can take 1-2 days, along with another 1-2 days to install them in the correct order. Since you're not using OEM media (as explained above) such as Factory Recovery Media, you're going to have to use a different MS Product Key than the one you are using for the Motherboard you have now. Since it's not clear what your hardware environment is {do you have a desktop PC or laptop? OEM PC (Dell, HP, Acer, Toshiba)? or a self-built PC or a custom-built PC?}. So, you're wondering, how do you get another Product key for this new Mobo right? There's a few different ways. The legit methods involve Purchasing boxed Microsoft W7 retail media. These can be had from legit computer chain stores such as Best Buy, or Micro Center, or Staples. Or from legit online retailers such as newegg.com, amazon, or PCMall. W7 Ultimate is the most expensive license next to the Business licenses, and will run you about $80-$300 US.

    *IMPORTANT NOTE: If your existing Motherboard (custom or OEM) was built prior to 2009, in other words, a "non-modern" computer according to Microsoft, it means it was built in the XP-era (2001-2006) or Vista-era (2007-2009), and your Motherboard maker doesn't offer W7 drivers on their website, there's no guarantee W7 will work on that Mobo. FYI.
    <<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
     
    #5 BIGBEARJEDI, Aug 11, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2016
  6. abrogard

    abrogard Active Member

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    So I am correct in the first place after all. I effectively only have a licence for Win7 on that computer.

    I can download an ISO that I can use anywhere but wherever I use it the installation will not be capable of validation.

    Meaning no updates, etc. Effectively useless. Unless you want a permanent hassle.

    So my computer dies and my investment in an OS for it dies with it? That's what I suspected. That's what I'm worried about.

    And I question it because I've heard/read stuff about giving MS a ring or something and they can 'disconnect' it from the old hardware so's you can move it to a new platform.

    Neemobeer (need more beer?) : It is a good board, I think, an Azrock Z77 Pro 4. But I have another and I'd like to use it. Start from scratch, new. Then I'll get into troubleshooting the old, salvaging it if I can and put it to use somewhere. That's the way I operate.
     
  7. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    Some systems, typically vendors such as Dell, HP can have the key embedded in the mobo, but this isn't always true, so the key should be transferable between systems.
     
  8. abrogard

    abrogard Active Member

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  9. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Transferring the W7 product key to another Mobo in a different computer is generally frowned upon by Microsoft, and the answer to your question is "Yes" when your computer dies, your OS license dies with it in most cases.:waah: Professional computer repair techs can and do use phone activation with and without talking to a representative, as we know how to explain things. The average home user doesn't know what they can get away with or not, so they usually give up when the MS rep explains how things work and encourages the phone user to buy a new license (retail or OEM).:sosad: That's what they are paid to do. We Techs have experience in working the system, and so can get a key transferred if were are hired to do a repair of a crashed PC with a broken Mobo and must replace the hardware. I've had to do this for a number of Clients, and as neemo mentions, it can be done in most, but not all cases. It's certainly worth a try. Worst case you get a Tech who isn't willing to help you for whatever reason, and you either take your PC to a repair guy and pay him a $100 to fix it for you or pay $100 for a new product key. Half dozen of one, six of the other.

    You may disagree with this licensing, thanks to Mr. Gates, but Windows licenses have worked this way since 1985. If it bugs you that much, you could always switch to a Mac or Linux OS.:)

    BBJ
     
  10. Henry Wong

    Henry Wong Well-Known Member

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    Holy crap dude. All Microsoft supplied Windows install disks are "generic". Not a single one have any hardware specific drivers, its all generic one size fits most drivers. That's why it doesn't take a Blu-Ray disk for just the install. Windows has just enough to get it up and running so you can install the proper drivers. Nothing more and nothing less.

    (O_O) I suggest upgrading from dial up.

    You can use a COA on multiple machines, just remember that to be legal you have to remove the install from the previous machine. Though the more often that you use it, the more likely they are going to be like, Sir its been used 10 times this year, you need to buy a new one.

    Dude, that is no where near correct in any universe. The choice to support or not support hardware is the dissension of the hardware manufacturer, Microsoft has nothing to do with that. Look at nVidia, they put out drivers for the 7 series, a card from like 2003 or 2005, all the way up to Windows 8. Most manufacturers are like that, well unless you are talking about AMD or ATI that is, they are quick to drop support.

    Never support downgrading hardware. Apple is a huge waste of space and money. If you want old hardware go to a Goodwill Computer Works and buy there for 1/5 of the price. OSX isn't bad, though that has nothing to do with what Apple. They are piggy backing off a some what dependable and stable OS, well a lot better than Windows that is. Unix is the reason OSX hasn't crashed and burned LONG ago. Linux/GNU is good. Just remember if it ever give you a problem, just unplug it and restart it. that will usually fix the problem.

    Just throwing that out there.
     

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