Putting external hard drives on a server

Discussion in 'Windows 10 Networking' started by LDG, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    I will absolutely check out the compatibility of whatever NAS I get to ensure it works with my WDs.

    When you say "it spreads the disk load over the available disks", does that mean the NAS turns three separate externals into one? No more will I have H Drive, G Drive, etc? (It'll shift to NAS 1, NAS 2....)
     
  2. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    You can choose that during the configuration of your NAS.

    If you create a volume (that is what they call it) of one disk you don't have a fault tolerant system.
    On the other hand if you make a volume of 2 or more disks in something like Hybrid Raid - as Synology calls it - you have a reasonable error recovery and speed.
    But you may also make 2 volumes and select volume shadowing with maximum error recovery at the cost of a slow system. But volume shadowing never replaces backup!

    In most cases chosing something like 'Synology Hybrid RAID' won't be bad.
     
    #22 bochane, Mar 30, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2016
  3. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    Okay, I see three options there...
    1. Run all disks as one with no recovery abilities.
    2. Run separate and be fine.
    3. Run separate with volume shadowing for a slower, but recoverable system?

    Seems like separating them without shadowing is the way to go. It also sounds like NAS may increase risk of crashes or data loss?
     
  4. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    No, you get error recovery if you combine all disks into one volume of a type, in case of a Synology, 'Hybrid RAID'. If one of your disks crashes you just have to put in a new one and your NAS will recover! In certain models they are even hot swappable, don't switch off your NAS, just pull out the failing disk and put in a new one. What else do you want, it is exellent.

    I don't know the NAS's of other brands, but I am almost sure that every one offers such an option.
     
    #24 bochane, Mar 30, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016
  5. Davejackson99

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    exactly !!! Some routers also support an USB external drive to be plugged in an shared
     
  6. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    So either way (disks as one or separate) I would get the option of recovery, but slower speeds?
     
  7. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    No, volumes of only one disk have no error recovery. The NAS has no way to store the data needed for the recovery. The disk has to be restored from a back-up. See my previous answer:
    Hope it's helping. Keep asking if things are unclear,
    Henk
     
  8. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    That's where I thought I would get recovery....or are recovery and fault tolerant two different things?

    Also, the cheapest 2 bay NAS I see on amazon is around $37. 4 bay NAS's don't show up until $200+. Does it matter if I get one 4 bay or multiple 2 bay NAS's?
     
  9. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    I have to be careful now, because English is not my native language, and it looks like we don't understand each other.
    Ok, I used fault tolerant and recovery almost as synonym and that is what I meant.

    Again a NAS uses volumes, what is C: in Windows is a volume in a NAS.

    If a volume is configured out of 2 physical disks and the correct RAID type is used, the NAS stores recovery information on all disks which makes it possible for the NAS to recover from the loss of a disk. I thought this to be fault tolerant

    If you configure volumes consisting out of only one disk you can't do that, that is clear, and you can't recover from a crash, you will have to reload a backup. I thought this to be not fault tolerant.

    NAS 2 bay at $37 or 4 bay at $200+
    It should not make a difference, but have you seen what functionality you get? I only know Synology and it can do much more than file sharing: multimedia streaming, cloud functions, webfunctions.....

    Hope this explains it a bit more,
    Henk
     
    #29 bochane, Mar 31, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2016
  10. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    This tells me combining my 4 disks into one that is the correct RAID would make recovery possible.

    This tells me that separate volumes for separate drives does not allow for any recovery. It basically creates a possibly unstable configuration.

    I haven't checked out the functionality comparisons quite yet. Didn't even know about those details, but it does explain the price differences.

    I think I'm starting to get it. Does what I'm saying sound accurate yet?
     
  11. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    I sounds accurate!!

    Added
    Unstable, I would not call it unstable. My Synology NAS sends a monthly health report. If a disk is becoming bad, you see an error rate. When the error rate goes up replace the disk. This normally gives you the time you need.

    That was a nice conversation!
    Henk
     
    #31 bochane, Mar 31, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016
  12. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    That error report is a nice feature! That was a good conversation and I'm glad we're finally on the same page. My cousin has referred me to a Mediasonic ProBox HF2-SU3S2. Not sure what NAS's are really capable of though or what I'd need/want from mine. I'm really just looking for something that takes better care of my hard drives than the current setup that has each separate (I basically have my drives stacked on top of each other with a power strip and a usb strip next to them).
     
  13. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    Unfortunately, I think Synology NAS's might be out of my price range. I'm hoping to stay under $200. I was looking at the Netgear ReadyNAS 104 but after reading reviews and then talking to the Netgear community, they are basically telling me this could be a bad idea. Since my externals would need to be removed from their current enclosures to work in the ReadyNAS 104, the compatibility line is blurry. Add on to that the fact that my drives all need to be backed up because they'll apparently be wiped clean when the RN104 sees them and decides to format them. Not sure what to go with any more.
     
  14. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    I won't push you onto a Synology, it is just the one that I have and know, but look at the 'j' models. But I think you will find other ones from other manufactures too.

    And your externals have to be taken out of their enclosures for most NAS's
     
  15. LDG

    LDG New Member

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  16. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    IMHO Green drives are not the ones you should buy, but if you have then use them.....
     
  17. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    I didn't even know these drives had different colors...
     
  18. bochane

    bochane Honorable Member

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    It is the 'Green' model of WD ;)
     
  19. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    It's merely how Western Digital (WD) classifies their drives.
    • GREEN slowest in terms of performance but energy efficient
    • BLUE is your stock quality drive
    • BLACK is your high performance (gaming etc)
    • RED is ultra high performance and storage (up to 8TB per drive)
     
  20. LDG

    LDG New Member

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    Oi...all I look for is size and price. I know there are good brands out there as well, but I think I've settled on WD. So far, so good-knock on wood.

    I wonder if the Elements and My Drive externals are all under one color?
     

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