Win 7 Task bar = counter productivity

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by zain7478, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. zain7478

    zain7478 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wonder if anyone tried this with the new task of win 7

    1. open 2 windows of firefox/internet explorer
    2. open another 2 documents of word
    3. minimize all of them

    now, how do we get to the first opened firefox window? or any of the word document?
    i have to move the cursor to the firefox icon and wait some split of a second and choose which window i want and click it.
    what if i want to maximize the other firefox window?
    i have to move again the cursor to the firefox icon and wait some split of a second and click the firefox window i want.

    why can't we have the vista way?
    the open documents tabs are already there - to the right portion of the task bar.
    all we have to do is to move the cursor to which ever tab we want and its a click away....

    i really hope those guys at the new taskbar of win 7 development team, re-think about this.... and do something in the final version of win 7.
    cheers.
     
  2. Kyle

    Kyle New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    53
    I don't know, I think I'd rather wait the 150 milliseconds for the tabs to load than to clutter up my taskbar when I have my usual dozen programs and multiple iterations up.

    But maybe that's just me.
    Anyone else?
     
  3. zain7478

    zain7478 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    well....
    i'm just describing the sort of things i do in windows

    have 2 or more documents opened for editing... comparing and correcting...
    it is sort of handy in vista just to move the cursor down, and click the doc tab - it is just so natural and smooth....:redface::redface:.. as if it is part of the movement of my mind.. my hand just flow with my thought without having to figure out whose turn it is now!!! :rolleyes:

    i installed win 7 beta, and i think i'll stick to vista for the time being :( though i love some of the new features in win7....
     
  4. HP Deskjet

    HP Deskjet Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    6
    Why not just press the Windows button on your keyboard and the tab button at the same time. You'll get your Windows in Flip 3D.

    Win+tab and you can Flip 3d through your windows just like in Vista.

    Or, in the Taskbar & Start Menu properties under the Taskbar tab, select Taskbar Buttons then select 'Never Combine or Combine when taskbar is full' to get the old Vista taskbar look when you have several instances of certain applications [eg. Word, etc.] open.

    See screenshots.
     
  5. Leoul

    Leoul New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    3
    When I read this article posted by zain7478, I was thinking to replay him some possibilities to use the task bar like vista. But below I see a very satisfying replay posted by HP Deskjet. HP you replied him very well.
     
  6. zain7478

    zain7478 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    hi..
    thanks for you feedbacks

    the point is - in my situation...
    when you are engrosssed in 'thinking' etc..., you do not want your flow of thoughts to be disturbed or distracted by having to look at the keyboard and 'finding' the alt and tab keys, or win + tab keys just to switch the docs.

    you might lose a very important idea, are about to make...:confused:
    if possible, i'd like to have an os that allows me to flip between the docs i am working on, by using my 'mind' :eek: ...
    well, just like one of the heroes in 'Heroes' does! :D

    anyway, i think i'll stick to vista, unless some third party software allows me to do what i am so used to, in the coming win7.
     
  7. HP Deskjet

    HP Deskjet Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    6
    Well, this simply boils down to personal preference and a case of "you can't please all the people all of the time". I can remember how badly XP was received when it was brought out. Reviews as bad as Vista and very few working drivers, etc. So many people said then, "XP - it's all just bloated eye candy and I 'aint changing to it". Many hated, loathed and even despised XP on its introduction, yet it now seems to be so loved by so many. Very odd I find. The same behaviour went on with Vista, which was compacted by a sustained media hate campaign against it. People just don't like change once they get stuck in old habits, and, as we all are aware, old habits die hard. How time seems to have allowed people to have conveniently forgotten that Windows 2000 to XP OS transitional period.

    Unfortunately, it looks as though you will have to stay with Vista because I can't see Microsoft going back to the old taskbar. All that they may be able to do is give the option to have the old type Vista taskbar UI as an option under Taskbar & Start Menu Properties. That said, I don't think it'll be happening.

    From 2001:

    "Office XP: mostly eye candy /XP deserves its cool reviews.

    Posted by : James Mathewson

    6/01/01 Office XP: mostly eye candy. Despite some interesting interfaces and fixes, XP launches to cool reviews.
    By James Mathewson

    One of the most interesting aspects of the Microsoft trial is the way the company dealt with it. As I will explore in much more depth in the June 11 Newsletter, Microsoft's developers basically ignored the antitrust ruling and went right along on the course Gates charted in his book, "The Road Ahead"-- a road that leads toward total domination of the desktop and Internet markets. Integral to this are several product announcements slated for this summer and early fall, which will extend Microsoft's OS monopoly into the Internet. The first of these happened yesterday, when Redmond released Office XP, the latest upgrade of its productivity software package and the biggest breadwinner in its entire product line.

    Despite the fact that this is the most significant product Microsoft has released since Office 2000 (which it released about 18 months ago), reviews range from cynical to lukewarm. I have yet to find a whole-hearted endorsement. Even those who like the product are looking for ulterior motives in the timing of the release, as a news story on our site today describes. There seems to be a hesitance in the industry as it waits for the appeals process to conclude in about a month. No one wants to get too excited about Microsoft until after the ruling, despite the fact that it is without question the strongest company in the tech sector, and growing stronger every day.

    Setting aside antitrust apprehension, the product deserves its less-than-enthusiastic greeting. It offers users only one notable enhancement, which is really just a bug fix. The most annoying aspect of all Office versions is the lack of control over autoformatting features. My biggest pet peeve is having to perform several separate operations to deactivate URLs. Even with all the appropriate check boxes unchecked, I still am forced to save some documents I receive as text, close out of them, and open them again in Word to remove autoformatting. Office XP has a feature called "smart tags," which will allow users to have much more control over the program's "intelligent" features, and to do so in a much easier way.

    Aside from smart tags, Office XP does not increase the number of things users can do, it just makes it easier to do those things (after training, of course). So many reviewers find the $239 upgrade price, plus $100 for Access XP, to be too stiff. And as most IT managers know, the actual cost of new software only begins with price. Considering it just launched a new Office version less than two years ago, Microsoft should not be vexed by a lukewarm reception. It should expect it. And it probably does expect it. When you spend $4.2 billion on R&D a year, you naturally develop products faster than the market can consume them.

    James Mathewson is editorial director of ComputerUser magazine and ComputerUser.com."
     
  8. Kylethedarkn

    Kylethedarkn Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    18
    Then Change it. Just right Click the taskbar then go to properties. Then in the drop down box select group when the taskbar is full. Then hit ok. Tada its like Xp again.
     
  9. HP Deskjet

    HP Deskjet Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    6
    Indeed. That's what I advised in my post. Apparently, it's not satisfactory because it's not exactly the same as far I read it.
     
  10. Kylethedarkn

    Kylethedarkn Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    18
    Sorry must of missed it while skimming over you text chunks. XD
     
  11. CodeOfsilence

    CodeOfsilence New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    they have already thought about this.
    Simply right click on the task bar - go to - Properties - Then under "Task bar buttons" select Never hide from the menu. Your problem is solved. Enjoy.
     

Share This Page

Loading...