Windows Requirements for knowing and using an email address

docjavatorduncan

Well-Known Member
I used to have things set up so that if I wanted to mail a page link from, say, FIrefox, Windows would prompt me to choose a mailing program and then I could set an addressee and send email. I don't remember what I had to do to set that up but I'm hesitant to do it again because of Windows' requirements. To set this up, Windows wants me to agree to let it read, delete, and otherwise process my email. Delete??? I don't want to give that power to Windows. That sounds like a way to have a security breach. Is there any way I can set up Mail without having to give those rights? These are pretty harsh requirements in my view. I only want to forward page URLs. I know the Mail app does more than that but that's all I want to do, not give away the store. Thanks.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
The permissions are basically there to tell you what the program can do. The program itself can't do anything without human interaction.
 

JandN2639

Well-Known Member
So the permissions don't allow Windows to do anything? I understand such statements to mean that an app’s algorithm can determine what happens with emails, texts, etc.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Correct the permissions do not give Microsoft access to anything. It's meant to provide transparency on what capabilities the application has.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Back to the original question though. Windows specifically allows you to "Send To" > Email on any file on your computer this requires a default program to be selected for email. This won't work if you only access email through a browser vs a thick client such as Outlook, Mail or Thunderbird. If you want to send a webpage directly as an email attachment from the browser I don't believe that is supported out of the box (and that would be browser dependent). For example, in Chrome there are a number of extensions you can add to add that functionality.
 
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