Windows Security Problem

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by SC77, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    RPMs? Depends on your perspective, generally speaking faster is better so 7200 would be better than 5400, just not quite as critical if you're just using it for backup purposes. Faster is never better when it comes to heat disipation so keep in mind, no matter what you select make sure that the enclosure has at least a large mesh area to help with heat disipation and ideally one with a cooling fan as part of the enclosure would be good, or take a look at some of these "Docks" and purchase the hard drive seperately. And definitely stay away from those small form factor drives that are literally sealed in a plastic tomb with no ventilation at all. I believe the link to the 500 gig above is an example of one of those. I had a 160 just like that and it was great, nice small compact could carry it around it my shirt pocket. Lasted about 4 months and I'm convinced it was heat that took it down.
     
  2. SC77

    SC77 New Member

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    The 1tb 7200 one looks like it has ventilation though, would that be a good choice?
     
  3. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    If I were you I would look around for one that is similar but has had more reviews (feedback) that would reflect actual owners experience. That one doesn't seem to have any yet and I don't think you want to be the first to crash test it. Reviews aren't necessarily the holy grail when deciding on a purchase but at least they can give you a little more insight and pay attention to manufacturer's warranties. I really can't say yay or nay except that I do know Seagate generally makes good drives. But I don't actually own that product and my personal experience with those types of devices hasn't been all that good, on one the drive failed and on another the enclousure electronics failed, that's why I've gone to the "Fast Swap Docks" and I catch the hard drives on sale price/size that I want, gives me more flexibility as I use more than one drive, I keep images on one and standard data file backups on the other
     
  4. Firecracker

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    Tip: You can plug a USB 2.0 into a USB 3.0 port, But Not a USB 3.0 device into a USB 2.0 port, Backwards comaptible one way with the new standard because of the additional pins that are on USB 3.0 so this means a USB 3.0 can only work with USB 3.0 ports.

    I have a western digital 500GB USB 2.0 5400RPM slim line hard disk, one of those you put in your pocket and go! never had any problems, Had it for 7 months no over heating or anything. and 5400PM, that's what you have on many laptops, does every thing I need.
    I Get up-to 12MB/s data transfer.

    Another note: Never, ever leave an external hard disk plugged in and running off the computer 24/7, they never last this way, nor does the the battery on the laptop. Plug it in only when you need to use it.
     
    #24 Firecracker, Dec 30, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2010
  5. SC77

    SC77 New Member

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    i know but I would be able to plug in a usb 2.0 cable into the computer and the hard drive, right?
     
  6. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    Interesting observation since everyone of these devices that I have checked all seem to say backwards compatable with USB 2.0 and often even USB 1.0
    And I can still remember when you would plug a USB 2.0 device into a USB 1.0 port you would always get a message something to the effect that "This device can perform faster/better if you use the proper USB 2.0 interface" it would always still work just a little slower, so naturally I thought that this transition/upgrade would work similarly. Interesting.
     
  7. Firecracker

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    thought you said you wanted the USB 3.0 drive and plug it into a USB 2.0 port until you upgrade to a pc with USB 3.0, No you can't, not even replace the Drives USB 3.0 cable with a USB 2.0 cable. All USB 3.0 devices, Cables and ports all have 9 pins or cotacts so is not compatible with USB 2.0 stuff no way to fix the issue, or modify it.

    simply all USB 3.0 stuff only works together.
     
  8. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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  9. Firecracker

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    yer, which to me seems that both data and power pins are arranged to make use of the additional 5 pins aswell as the old 4 pins, while leaving the original 4 pins are used for USB 3.0 aswell as so you can sill use the ports for older USB 2.0 Devices the other 5 pins are for more power and data aswell and without all 9 pins a USB 3.0 device will not work, this is why they only work on USB 3.0 ports. not usb 2.0 ones.
     
  10. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    Maybe this will help further

    It's backwards compatible. Your existing USB 2.0 gear will work on version 3.0 ports and vice versa. You'll be able to maximize your bandwidth when using a USB 3.0 cable with USB 3.0 devices and ports, otherwise plugging a 3.0 device into a 2.0 port or a 2.0 device into 3.0 a port will get you standard USB 2.0 data rates.
    SOURCE: USB 3.0: What You Need To Know - TechSpot

    The beauty of USB 3.0 is its backward compatibility with USB 2.0; you need a new cable and new host adapter (or, one of the Asus or Gigabyte motherboards that supports USB 3.0) to achieve USB 3.0, but you can still use the device on a USB 2.0 port and achieve typical USB 2.0 performance.
    SOURCE: USB 3.0 Finally Arrives - PCWorld
     
  11. Firecracker

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    That's rubbish, My USB 3.0 flash drive won't fit into a usb 2.0 port. the USB 3.0 connector is bigger than the USB 2.0 receptical
    it only fits into a USB 3.0 port
     
  12. Trouble

    Trouble Noob Whisperer

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    Just inorder to put this to rest and make sure that we are not mis-informing anyone as to what USB 3.0 is and how it works I went out (just now) and purchased a Western Digital My Passport Essential 500 GB USB 3.0 external hard drive, which as I had mentioned earlier states plainly on the box that it is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 it even says 100% compatible. So I anxiously brought it home, removed it from the box plugged in the cable to my USB 2.0 hub (I have no USB 3.0 connection on my computer at all) and as they promised 100% compatible with USB 2.0 worked straight away right out of the box, found new hardware, your new hardware is installed and ready to use, opened it up in my computer saw that it had been factory formatted with NTFS (465 GB) and contained the WD SmartWare that JoeS is always warning us about.
    Now I just don't know what I'm going to use it for since I really don't have a need for it, but it may come in handy for something, especially when I upgrade to a MoBo with USB 3.0 ports.
    I am not endorsing this product nor am I suggesting that the OP run out and buy one, just pointing out that I believe the USB 3.0 standard as it is written provides backward compatibility for USB 2.0 and as such, if the device plainly states on the packaging that it is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 then I would suspect that it is. This is of course not to say that there isn't in fact any manufacturers making USB 3.0 devices that aren't backwards compatible with USB 2.0 but the product should be plainly marked as such and as is the case in the rest of real life, buyer beware.
     

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