Application crashes

flecsy

New Member
I have a recent phenomenon where playing an AVI file in Windows Media Player crashes the player. Other video types work fine. Now, I discovered that I cannot load a JPG file in ArcSoft PhotoBase if an AVI file resides in the same folder. In fact, I tested on a folder with no AVI files and it loaded fine. While the PhotoBase application was up I dropped an AVI file into that folder, and it instantly crashed. This has just started happening in the past week or two. I have reinstalled applications and loaded new codecs with no success. I also ran malware software and cleaned the registry.

The error is: Windows Media Player has stopped working and PhotoBase 4.5 File has stopped working
 


BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
I don't use WMP on W10 as it's been problematic from the git-go. avi files are very old movie files (c. 1992). you could try using a different player such as the free VLC player. However, in my experience there are lots of issues with avi files created with older codecs (literally there are hundreds of them to choose from, and often avi files were encoded with more than 1 codec, which means your chance of finding the right player with the correct type and number of codecs is not good (you'd have a better chance of winning the lottery!).

You can also use a free converter which you can google, and simply convert the avi file to a more modern movie file type such as .mp4, or mpeg4, wmv, flv (flash player), or quicktime.

Next question is, are those avi files created by you on a camcorder or smartphone? or did you download them from the Internet? Are they commercial movies like those you'd buy from Netflix or Redbox?

I still have some old avi files that were commercially produced, and trying to make those work on W10 is probably not going to work for you. The conversion process you can do yourself with free software may work on a few of those files, but certainly not all. You could also pay a Service to do the conversion for you, just about every community I've lived in, there is a local person doing this service. They are in the yellow pages or search the Internet. You can find people who do this by looking up someone who converts old VHS tapes onto Digital discs such as CDs or DVDs. They often have the right software on their computers to also convert ancient movie files such as yours.

In the meantime, simply separate all your avi movie files into one folder and get them out of the folder you have your PhotoBase program pointing to. You yourself observed that if the avi files are not sharing the same folder nicely, separating them seems to work. This could be accomplished quite easily with W10 File Explorer using it's file management capabilities. Think of it as having 2 teenager siblings in your house who can't get along living together in the same room-separating them into different rooms or living spaces often solves the problem!;)

<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
 


flecsy

New Member
I don't use WMP on W10 as it's been problematic from the git-go. avi files are very old movie files (c. 1992). you could try using a different player such as the free VLC player. However, in my experience there are lots of issues with avi files created with older codecs (literally there are hundreds of them to choose from, and often avi files were encoded with more than 1 codec, which means your chance of finding the right player with the correct type and number of codecs is not good (you'd have a better chance of winning the lottery!).

You can also use a free converter which you can google, and simply convert the avi file to a more modern movie file type such as .mp4, or mpeg4, wmv, flv (flash player), or quicktime.

Next question is, are those avi files created by you on a camcorder or smartphone? or did you download them from the Internet? Are they commercial movies like those you'd buy from Netflix or Redbox?

I still have some old avi files that were commercially produced, and trying to make those work on W10 is probably not going to work for you. The conversion process you can do yourself with free software may work on a few of those files, but certainly not all. You could also pay a Service to do the conversion for you, just about every community I've lived in, there is a local person doing this service. They are in the yellow pages or search the Internet. You can find people who do this by looking up someone who converts old VHS tapes onto Digital discs such as CDs or DVDs. They often have the right software on their computers to also convert ancient movie files such as yours.

In the meantime, simply separate all your avi movie files into one folder and get them out of the folder you have your PhotoBase program pointing to. You yourself observed that if the avi files are not sharing the same folder nicely, separating them seems to work. This could be accomplished quite easily with W10 File Explorer using it's file management capabilities. Think of it as having 2 teenager siblings in your house who can't get along living together in the same room-separating them into different rooms or living spaces often solves the problem!;)

<<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
The AVI files are off of a fairly old Nikon CoolPix camera. It would not be a huge deal to convert them as I have conversion software. What I don't understand is why this just started happening? I suppose it could be from a Windows update. Thanks for the reply.
 


BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
Yup, just as I suspected. Most likely, it's from an update, or it could also be from a virus/malware attack? Have you scanned for viruses with your built-in AV program (Norton, Avast, WD, McAfee)? If not, you should do so before going to all the trouble of moving your files or worse yet converting them all (could be hundreds or even thousands!). Scan/remove all found viruses. Next, visit piriform.com and download the free MALWAREBYTES antispyware program if you don't have it already. Scan/removal all spyware viruses found. Reboot your PC and retest for the problem. If the AVI files now open without crashing your WMP, you had a virus/malware infection which has now been removed and you've repaired the problem! :up:

If the problem persists, and you still suspect your computer as malfunctioning, and it's 3 years old or older your hard drive could be failing and coincidentally failed on or near the weekly Tuesday-update push from Microsoft; and it's the real cause of your problem here. You can download the free Seatools drive diagnostic and test your hard drive. After running both short and long tests, if Seatools returns any errors, your hard drive has failed and must be replaced!:waah:
Backup everything you can to external media if you haven't done so previously, purchase a new drive and reinstall your W10, progams, and then copy your data back including your folder of mixed movie files. Retest. It should work now. :up:

Best of luck,
<<<BBJ>>>
 


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