Boot record messed up.

Discussion in 'Windows 10 Help and Support' started by IrvSp, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. IrvSp

    IrvSp Well-Known Member

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    This Dell XPS 8700 started out at Windows 8.1. Before I even started using it, I used Paragon's Migrate OS to SSD 4.0 to move the C: partition to an SSD and be able to boot to it. Prior to doing that I shrunk down the original C: to basically match the SSD size and created another data partition on the original hard drive. Worked well (kept the original C: and via the BIOS or F12 could boot to it if need be).

    Then came Win10. It could NOT be installed, kept failing on the reboot and reverted back to W8.1. I had NO problem upgrading the original hard drive C: though.

    Posting in the MS forums and others I discovered I was NOT alone with the error and all those that did had used Paragon's program as well. Posted to Paragon for help, no answer. See Migrate SSD, W10, can't upgrade to SSD for the old details.

    Eventually using the W10 USB install media with other drives detached (I recall) I did get W10 installed. Even the Aniv. Update installed OK on it.

    However, basically my PC's BIOS and boot method is messed up. It appears all the BOOT info is on the original hard drive.

    Here is what DISKMGMT shows:

    Capture.JPG

    Why the duplicate partitions? Don't know but everything works.

    It appears the first partition is the only boot record I have and that does the control. My BIOS and F12 boot menu used to have the SSD drive as choices but they are gone now? I have to used the MSCONFIG boot menu if I want to boot the old hard drive now which comes up for a few seconds before the SSD is booted. Only way now to get back to the old C:. BIOS shows only the old hard drive as bootable.

    BCDEDIT data:

    ============
    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bcdedit /enum active

    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier {bootmgr}
    device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1
    path \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description Windows Boot Manager
    locale en-US
    inherit {globalsettings}
    default {current}
    resumeobject {7d9dad93-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    displayorder {current}
    {7d9dad81-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
    timeout 3
    displaybootmenu No

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {current}
    device partition=C:
    path \WINDOWS\system32\winload.efi
    description Windows 10
    locale en-US
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence {7d9dad95-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    recoveryenabled Yes
    isolatedcontext Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice partition=C:
    systemroot \WINDOWS
    resumeobject {7d9dad93-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    nx OptIn
    bootmenupolicy Standard

    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {7d9dad81-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume5
    path \WINDOWS\system32\winload.efi
    description Windows 10 HD
    locale en-US
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence {7d9dad82-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    recoveryenabled Yes
    badmemoryaccess Yes
    isolatedcontext Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume5
    systemroot \WINDOWS
    resumeobject {7d9dad80-aa98-11e3-860f-f8b156dd6a5b}
    nx OptIn
    bootmenupolicy Standard
    =========================
    EASYUEFI output shows the 2 possible boots, but both from the same disk:
    Capture1.JPG Capture2.JPG

    EASYBCD output:
    Capture3.JPG

    Windows 10 boots the SSD, Windows 10 HD, the old hard drive.

    What I'd prefer to have is the 'old way'. Use the BIOS to arrange the SSD to be seen and booted and when the BIOS sees the SSD I can then use F12 to select which to boot from. F12 only shows the old hard drive now.

    Not even sure if this is 'fixable'? It is more of an annoyance than a requirement.

    Any suggestions or insight here? I suspect a boot sector is missing from the SSD and that would need to be created? Even then, not sure how to fix the BIOS not seeing the drive? It did before I ran the MIGRATE program?

    Just looking for an 'answer' here more than anything else for something that has been bothering me. Not sure I'd make a change unless it was simple and guaranteed (I do have backups of all drives). I might be better off leaving it alone.
     
  2. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    Exactly for this reason is why creating a system image is necessary....so after the new drive is installed the image is moved over...easily and painlessly. You hear a lot of horror stories from users using these migration software packages and something went wrong.

    For most of us PC builders/enthusiasts, we always prefer a clean install on a new HDD or SSD and then there are those that use the system image which is 3 - 5 times faster than a clean install.
     
  3. IrvSp

    IrvSp Well-Known Member

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    You are correct, and I did that with the other PC we got a few years before. Put in the SSD, disconnected other disks and installed with the PC's install disks. Was using Norton Ghost then and used it to bring the SSD up to the same as the old C:. Hit a 'small' snag as the restore wrote the same disk ID to the SSD and Windows 'choked' on two of the same disk ID's. Easy fix, edit sector 0 with a binary disk editor.

    Wasn't really a pain to do but it did take some time and a few steps. So I decided to use Paragon's program as it was only $20. Everything was fine, until I had to upgrade to W10 and hit the roadblocks.
     
  4. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    All you need to do is delete the duplicate GPT partition and the duplicate BCD entry. You can delete the GPT partition that ends in "on Disk 1" and you can delete the BCD entry that has the partition set to \Device\HarddiskVolume5
     
  5. IrvSp

    IrvSp Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't that remove the booting to one of the W10's, the one on the hard disk?

    What I'd like is the BIOS to see BOTH hard drives, the SSD and mechanical one. If that could be done, the Dell BIOS F12 boot menu would allow me to choose which to boot. Right not, only the Mechanical is seen in the BIOS, and if selected the Mechanical drive is booted, not the SSD. Only way to boot the SSD is via the Windows Boot Manager which sees both partitions.

    Capture.JPG

    First entry is the SSD, 2nd the Mechanical. Right now, I have to use this, which shows for 3 seconds before the boot continues to the selected disk, otherwise I could not boot to the Hard disk (2nd entry).

    I used to be able to do this by either going into the BIOS and selected the desired disk as the bootable drive or via the F12 menu. Didn't need Windows Boot Manager at all.
     
  6. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
    Staff Member

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    Ok I didn't realize you had a second Window 10 install. So just delete the duplicate GPT partition that points to K.
     

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