Installed new CPU yesterday downhill since then.

Discussion in 'Windows 10 Help and Support' started by Talkstothewalls, Oct 18, 2015.

  1. Talkstothewalls

    Talkstothewalls New Member

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    I am not great with computers, but I'm going to do my best to describe my issue and see if there might be a way to fix it.

    I did the automatic windows 10 upgrade a few weeks ago.

    Yesterday I installed a new CPU on my system nothing else changed. After the CPU install things went swimmingly. Had no issues until late in the afternoon when I started to get tab out crashes. At one point, after a tab out I could see everything on the desktop but I could not interact with anything except the program icons on the status bar. After attempting to close non-responsive programs from the status bar by right clicking and selecting close window, the machine shut itself down.

    As of this morning my machine will not successfully boot at all. It gets to the login screen and in the process of entering the password the machine ceases to function, restarts and goes back to the login screen. This happened several times in a row until finally the "Windows failed to boot properly" screen comes up. I cannot use system restore, it errors and fails. I cannot restore to a save point, it errors and fails.

    How do I do a clean windows install if I cannot start my machine up?
     
  2. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Hi,
    can you post some details about what system your using and what you upgraded cpu wise.
     
  3. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
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    Had you been getting any Activation messages?
     
  4. helpifIcan

    helpifIcan Extraordinary Member

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    Did you use thermal paste, could just be ELF failure of the CPU chip. ELF=early life failure.
     
  5. Talkstothewalls

    Talkstothewalls New Member

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    Yes on paste. No messages about activation.

    Cpu was reporting 56c as highest temp under highest load I could produce.
     
  6. Talkstothewalls

    Talkstothewalls New Member

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    Gigabyte 990fxa-ud3 Mobo, upgraded to an Amd 8350fx, 250ssd, 1T wdblue, 8Gb 1333ddr3 ram, cooler master hyper 212 evo cpu cooler installed with the new chip.

    The terabyte drive has my Windows 7 image on it but I cannot boot from it either.
     
  7. Talkstothewalls

    Talkstothewalls New Member

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    Now that I think about it I was getting promted to update my Bit Defender yesterday. It was current but with the wiX upgrade it no longer worked. The message I was getting yesterday was about updating to the new software that was compatible with windows 10.
     
    #7 Talkstothewalls, Oct 18, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  8. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
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    I was wondering if changing the CPU might have caused your system to become inactive due to the change, but maybe not.

    Have you tried booting with only one drive connected? Was Windows 7 on the SSD when you upgraded to Windows 10?

    Can you get into the system Bios to check the status of the processor and memory?

    Anything you can try by making use of the "Dual Bios"?

    The "Hybrid EFI" looks a little strange, I wonder if Windows 10, being UEFI compatible might have a problem with it?
     
  9. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    I used to have one of those moBo's and usually they are pretty solid.

    You shouldn't get any activation messages as you need to change the cpu twice. (it's considered similar to a new mobo)

    As you've just fitted the components together make sure that all connections are sound and you could even try reseating the new stuff.

    Make sure the bios is fully updated.

    As suggested try removing all drives except the drive with the os installed. If your board has a uefi bios (mine didn't but I think later versions of the board does ) make sure your running in legacy mode.
     
  10. SizZLeR

    SizZLeR Member

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    I know this is an old thread, but others may run into the same issue and find this thread in their search results when looking for answers.

    To me this sounds like lack of PSU power, because drawing too much power from the PSU will make it unstable and hence make the system unstable, causing failure in memory, cpu, bus etc. and as this is happening randomly, it wont be the exact same way and at teh same point each and every time.

    Be aware, that cpu power isnt as basic as so many watts, the total watts is just an expression of how much electrical energy it can deliver in total.
    PSUs have 3 different voltage outputs (12v, 5v and 3.3v) from which you can draw only so many amps at a time.

    So when it says for instance "700W" on a PSU, it means that those three circuits combined are good for delivering that amount of energy.

    If you compare gaming oriented PSUs against office desktop PSUs even at the same total watt rating, you will typically find, that the watt ratings for those are very differently divided between the 12v, 5v and 3.3v part, where the gaming PSU will usually have more power on the 12v part and less on the other two, as the gaming computer will need much more power for the gfx board(s) which are 12v.
     
  11. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Agreed, often users forget when buying a PSU, particularly for a gaming set up, that the Amperage is equally as important.

    A Graphics card may need a 500W PSU to run but it will also need a certain amount of Amperage. If the Amperage output is less then the required amount the gpu can blue screen and have issues even though it's being supplied the correct wattage.
     
  12. SizZLeR

    SizZLeR Member

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    Precisely kemical, as watts are calculated from voltage and amperes like so:

    Watt = Volt * Ampere
    Watt / Volt = Ampere
    Watt / Ampere = Volt
     

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