just when ........

3doz

Senior Member
#21
i think the problem is its not called old
I have two installation called just windows on both C and D drives
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#22
Hi

Can you back up your D:\ drive, or copy the files you want to keep to some place else and format it?

You could even do this on your C:\ (which used to be your D:\ drive anyway) if you have plenty of space.

Just make a folder on your C:\ drive called My D Drive and copy everything but the Windows folder there.

Then after you have it formatted copy everything back to it.

This seems like a lot of work but it should get the job done and you'll have a nice clean drive.

Once you have the data all backed up you should be able to just right click on it and do a quick format.

Mike
 


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3doz

Senior Member
#23
if only I have a mountain of rare movies on the drive
I can change the old windows directory to any name I want
there must be a boot files somewhere that loads up sections of the old 32 I think
will look for a file and see if its possible to change it
even tried using safe mode with full control
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#24
Hi again.

It seems like if you can change the name of the old Windows folder that would stop it from loading anything from it.
It wouldn't be able to find any of the old files.

Weird.

You suppose you could try and delete it from the C:\ prompt.

I don't remember much of my Dos anymore but someone here must.

I think you just go to the C:\ prompt with administrator privileges and type Delete D:\Windows but I'm not sure anymore.
You'll have to make sure the folder is named that at the time.

If you have a lot of rare movies on your D:\ drive you should get an external hard drive and back them all up anyway just to be on the safe side.

I get really nervous when ever I have important files in only one location.

Mike
 


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3doz

Senior Member
#25
I love a challange :)
it would apear easy bcd did not do the job correctly could be its a old version .
any way the computer would not boot so I placed the original disc in and did a repair it replaced both boot loaders again
and rebooted without finding the renamed windows .
it wount delete still
so there must be a file that directs the boot to use both 32 & 64 somewere.
do you know of a nother program that would do a simular job to easybcd ?
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#26
Hi

You could download Ubuntu and boot from the disk.
Use the file manager to delete the old Windows files it won't care what Windows thinks.

I don't really think that the reason you can't delete them has to do with the boot file or their being in use.
Windows 7 just decides that something shouldn't be deleted and that's it.

I have a folder on my D:\ drive names "Mike's Files", it doesn't have any software in it, no system files etc.

I copied it to my B:\ drive and tried to delete it from it's original location.

No luck nothing I tried would get rid of it, I even posted about it here.

I deleted all the sub folders but it still wouldn't delete.

I finally moved everything back into it and deleted the one on B:\.

I'm going to make a new Ubuntu disk myself, my old one won't boot my computer after making changes to it.

Maybe I'll give my folder another try too!

Download | Ubuntu

Mike
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#27
Hi

It worked for me.

I made a new Ubuntu disk, booted into it.

Recopied the offending folder to drive B:\ again.
Then deleted it from D:\.

Booted back into Windows and all is well.

I finally have the folder where I want it and not where I don't.

Give it a try.

Go with the 32 bit version of Ubuntu, it will boot anything.

PS. you can download and use Image Burn to make the bootable Ubuntu disk from the ISO.

The Official ImgBurn Website

Mike
 


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3doz

Senior Member
#28
Thanks for that will dowload and keep
I fould a way the hard drive with the old windows was still active ststem loadind so I changed it to a standard primary and then I could delete any directory . I use a old program disc repair it alows changes without loosing twhats on them , I forgot I had it , your last comments reminded me
many thanks for all the support and have great year
regards Bob
 


3doz

Senior Member
#29
one last , your suggested file program looks like a complete operating system < is it as good as windows and can it run almost every program.
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#30
Hi

I thought I did this a while ago, must have forgotten to hit post...

Ubuntu is a version of Linux.

It will boot from the CD with a web browser, a e-mail client, a file Manger and a office substitute, (Open Office) and some other utilities. If you want you can install it on a partition or second hard drive from the CD.

So you can do most of the normal things, but to run other software is kind of a pain.
Since pretty much nothing is designed to run on Linux it takes a lot of messing around to get anything to work.

A lot of things just won't.

I have a friend who runs Linux for his every day use, but he still has to boot Windows to run games or use his scanner.

I don't think it's worth the effort though I'd love to be able to run every thing from it.

It's very stable, almost immune to malware, and fast.

But having the disk around that will let you boot virtually any crashed computer can come in handy.

Recently my sister in-law's laptop crashed, it gave every indication that the hard drive was dying.
It was a really old computer.

Wouldn't access Windows in any mode. She didn't have a XP CD, and of course she'd never backed anything up.

Ubuntu to the rescue, booted from the CD, copied all of her data to DVDs and saved all her files.
Then we tried to do system restore from the restore partition. It wouldn't do that either.

Then she went and got a new computer.
We copied all her stuff back in and she was back in business with nothing lost.

Thank's to Ubuntu.

Mike
 


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