SMBv1 logon problem on Windows 10 after reactivation

rbakels

New Member
I have two connected laptops standing side by side. One is running Windows 10, the other Windows XP.
I need XP for some applications, and I am unable to convert them to Windows 10.
Until recently I shared the disks of both machines using a LAN connection, allowing me to access
the Windows 10 machine from XP, vice versa, but now I can only access XP from Windows 10.
Recently, Microsoft deactivated SMBv1 support on Windows 10, perhaps for the reason that I did
not use it for some time. Fortunately, I managed to reactivate SMBv1 support on Windows 10.
I know it is not recommended, but as far as I know there is no SMBv2 support for Windows XP
(please tell me if I am wrong).
Now I am able again to use the drives on the XP machine from the Windows 10 machine.
But the other way round it works funny: I am able to issue a "NET USE" command from XP for the drive
on the Windows 10 machine, and it responds "command completed", and the drive appears in the list
of drives, represented by a bit in the value returned by a GetLogicalDrives() call.
But whenever I try to access the disk, even to obtain the number of bytes available (using a GetDiskFreeSpaceEx
call), it responds with return code 1536 "Logon error: unknown user name or invalid password".
The funny thing is that the NET USE command (on XP) does not even prompt for a user name of password
(like it used to do before).
I followed the advice as given in
but my registry setting was correct already.
What should I do?
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Which programs can't you get working on Windows 10? I've run into very few I couldn't get to work and were talking 20+ year old legacy apps.
 

rbakels

New Member
It is not about specific programs. The SMB protocol should make remote files appear like local ones, so at least the DIR command should work when invoked for the network drive - but it does not (and it used to). I am not complaining about specific programs not running on Windows 10.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
You stated you're using the XP computer because some programs won't work on 10. I would address that rather than make your Windows 10 machine a lot less secure and still may not work anymore not only due to smbv1 being disabled but also older ciphers and SSL and TLS protocols being deprecated in Windows 10 making it harder and harder for the XP and Win 10 computers from being able to communicate.
 

rbakels

New Member
Please answer the question I am asking, and do not repeat the statements that Microsoft makes about security. That security was good enough from 2015 when I bought my Windows 10 laptop. Furthermore, I am running a two computer network at home, which is another reason to believe that security is not a major issue. And I do not process confidential data.
Windows refuses to start the legacy programs I am using saying that they are not compatible with 64-bit windows. You are welcome if you know a way to make such programs run on Windows 10, but replacing them is not an option.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
You should only need to enable smbv1 client and server on Windows 10. Like I said it's not guaranteed to work. Microsoft has been removing (completely) old security technologies so now or at some point it may just not work (no workarounds)
 

rbakels

New Member
Are you from Microsoft?

I am really dissatisfied that Microsoft overnight disables a function I need, without warning. Perhaps I should disable all updates.

Still I hope that a fellow user shows me how to proceed. It should be a minor thing. I do not expect anything new, just the same functionality I had the past five years.

Another option is to quit Windows completely.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
This site is not affiliated with Microsoft nor am I employed by them. It wasn't an overnight decision nor was it just disabled, it was announced far before it was rolled out to devices. SMBv1 is extremely insecure and vulnerable to many well know attacks and was replaced by SMBv2 and now we're on SMBv3. Since XP went EOL in 2014 Microsoft like every other vendor stopped supporting XP and redirected it's development resources as such.

To enable SMBv1 server configuration on Windows 10 you would just need to open Powershell elevated (right click powershell and select 'Run As Administrator')
Set-SmbServerConfiguration -EnableSMB1Protocol $true
 

rbakels

New Member
Sorry to offend you by suggesting that you are a Microsoft employee. Perhaps you should be more restrictive in defending Microsoft's position. You particularly made the impression representing Microsoft by adopting a position which gives that impression: extremely aware of security and insensible to the trade-offs a user will make.
Was the discontinuation of SMBv1 support announced before? Not to me. I am a hobby programmer and do not follow all developments day to day.
Re "extremely insecure": as I said, I run a two-computer network at home. Could anyone from the outside penetrate this network? I doubt so. And if it is possible, they could reach both my computers, so the connection between them over the "extremely insecure" SMBv1 protocol provides no additional threat.
If any criminals read this post: of course I protect myself against internet threats.
 

Neemobeer

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
No offense taken. I'm not partial to Microsoft, but I am very much pro security (I'm a cyber security engineer). SMBv1 didn't really have much in the way of security in mind, so I'm glad it's deprecated) and there are replacements available SMBv2 and SMBv3. From a development standpoint it wouldn't make sense to spend the time and money to add SMBv2/3 to an out of support operating system.

In my mind running anything out of support is like running around un-vaccinated during the middle of a infectious disease outbreak. XP is an extremely soft target to attack for anyone with intent on malicious activity. There are countless attacks that require no authentication, no user input to pull off a successful attack. It's my recommendation that if you do continue to use it that it never be used on the internet, only internal to the local network.
 

rbakels

New Member
The fact of the matter is that my "security" issue is that Microsoft destroys my working environment for my own good.
I used to work for another computer company that was blamed for abusing its monopoly, and we had the terrible tendency to "educate" our customers too.
The comparison with biologic virusses is completely displaced. Or perhaps there is a parallen since I do go on the street despute the fact that the pandemic is not over.
 
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