SSD 960gb and 700gb SSD pricing

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by mikezilla2, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. mikezilla2

    mikezilla2 Senior Member

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    so im thinking of importing the former rather then the later but im looking at pricing i dont live in the states but like wise i am wondering what sort of prices im looking at in regards to imports

    thanks
     
  2. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    http://www.amazon.com/Crucial-2-5-Inch-adapter-Internal-CT960M500SSD1/dp/B00BQ8RGL6 might be one place.

    Review http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/08/review_crucial_m500_960gb_ssd/

    960Gb SSDs go over $1000, so this is quite nicely priced. The possible costs of import depend on where you live, not that easy a question to answer, it depends on customs tariffs. The best way to get any disk might be to have a local trader to deliver it, they have the knowledge and channels for it. Or then you can pay through, say, PayPal, and ask the sender to mark it "A gift". Then it'll go freely through...
     
    #2 Pauli, Aug 28, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
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  3. mikezilla2

    mikezilla2 Senior Member

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  4. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    I don't know how you intend to use these SSDs but IMHO, 120GB is enough, 250GB is too much, 500GB is pointless for personal computers.
    These SSDs should be complemented with a spinner drive for data storage (preferably 7200rpm). Using SSD as a data storage is a waste. A 500GB SSD more or less will cost you $500 shipped to your door (Based on Samsung 840 series 500GB pricing).

    Cheers!
     
    #4 badrobot, Aug 28, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
  5. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    There is amazon.com.au
     
  6. mikezilla2

    mikezilla2 Senior Member

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  7. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    It doesn't matter where it directs you, as long as it delivers to your door. I am in Canada and I buy stuffs from Hong Kong via eBay.

    That link is for 1TB and Out of Stock.
    I was talking about this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-Series-500GB-Solid-State/dp/B009LI7CEE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377691745&sr=8-1&keywords=samsung+840+series+500GB
     
  8. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    I'm in the market for an SSD myself...I'm partial to the Samsung series myself.. the 840 Pro. Now Samsung has a new version out called the EVO....it has the new TLC controller instead of the MLC/MMC controller.

    Yeah, mikezilla2....that's the one in your link...
     
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  9. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    Bass, as long as you have the latest CPU as well to complement the performance of the SSD.. go for the EVO. Otherwise, Pro series should be good enough. :)
     
  10. mikezilla2

    mikezilla2 Senior Member

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  11. Mitchell_A

    Mitchell_A Excellent Member

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    As badrobot said, you're better off saving money and getting a smaller SSD. I had 120 GB one at one point and it was a bit too small for my usage, 250 GB would be the way I'd go and then pair it with a 750 GB 7200 RPM conventional hard drive.
     
  12. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I disagree that 256Gb is too big. 120Gb is too small to support Windows, all your downloaded and installed programs, the PF, your data files, Windows Update files, and still leave Windows enough free space to play in.

    But 265Gb is more than enough for the vast majority of users - unless they have tons of huge video files - in which case, then a spinner drive would be good.
     
  13. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    If and when I'm ready to buy an SSD, I'm getting a 500/512 GB size. Go big or go home is my motto. I'll use it just like my regular HDD. I figure, what's the point of having one if you're not going to use it....no different then buying a fast sports car and not opening it up on a regular basis.
     
  14. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    Bass, you would want to have a separate storage for your data and system files. Having everything in one hard drive will only make the creation of image back-up take longer to finish. If your data are on a separate drive, you will not have second thoughts of wiping out your SSD and recover it from an image if you run into big problems. Your data are intact on a separate drive. Or get two 250GBs if you wish. :) You would want the "system environment" clean and tidy to optimize the speed. Just a suggestion. It worked for me. I had to re-clone my Win 8 system's SSD twice when I ran into trouble (I kept the original clean installation in the original hd). Took only 15-20mins each time.
     
    #14 badrobot, Aug 28, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
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  15. Mitchell_A

    Mitchell_A Excellent Member

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    Exactly. Install the OS on your SSD and your most used programs, all other storage should go on the HDD.
     
  16. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    I disagree with that logic. My data is worth MUCH more than my apps. And my data takes up the same amount of space regardless which drive it is on. And my data and my apps take the same amount of time to backup - longer if on multiple drives.

    So if my data is on a separate drive, or my boot drive, the time to make backups, if not longer.

    But to that, it takes longer to reimage a HD than it does a SSD. A lot longer.

    And besides, I want my Word and Excel docs to "pop open" too. Not just Windows - so I want all my apps and data on SSDs too.

    Finally - I have not had to restore from a backup in years. So this desire to be able to reimage quickly baffles me - and certainly has no bearing to me on which type drive my data or apps will be stored on. The only thing there is to have a backup - just in case.

    The ONLY reason, IMO to use HDs is cost. If time matters that much to you - you should be using SSDs - not HDs.

    How many times over the last 20 years or so have we heard (over and over again), "you will never need more disk space than that"? Or, "you will never need more RAM than that".
     
  17. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    For me, if my PC boots up for more than 60sec, something is wrong with it. Instead of system restore, I do image recovery most of the time. it doesn't take long for me to do it. I am not saying I do it a lot. I am saying, that's my way.

    Its always better to have your data on a separate drive. It's like backing up your data in real time and not WHEN you need to. So that when your system fails, your data are safe and intact. And there's nothing stopping you to get another SSD for data storage. SSDs are very affordable these days. Word and Excel files are okay to stay on SSD. I am talking more about videos, photos and music or whatever besides documents.

    Nothing wrong with having to re-image quickly. But not wanting to re-image quickly is old school. My way is like having the best of both worlds... speed, instant back-up and instant recovery. It's like "Oh I got a virus... not to worry... image recovery/re-clone SSD... done in 15 mins!" :) For some, it will take hours (if their failing system would allow them to do so) just to back up their data before they can perform system recovery.

    The main logic is... Better safe than sorry.
     
    #17 badrobot, Aug 28, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
  18. Digerati

    Digerati Fantastic Member
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    IFand ONLY IF your computer normally takes considerably less than that, then it might indicate a problem. But again, taking longer does not necessarily mean a problem. It could mean files previously being marked for deletion are being deleted during boot, before any hooks are set in them. Windows Updates frequently does not update files until the next boot.

    My 3.8GHz i7, 16Gb RAM and Samsung Pro 256Gb SSD, W8 system takes less than 35 seconds to reboot. It takes about 1 min and 15 seconds to boot from full power off - most of the time, depending on the state of my system before reboot/shutdown.

    In any case, you should not compare your boot times with others unless you have the EXACT same hardware and the EXACT same software loading at boot. And again, boot times are NOT a true indication of system performance once fully booted.

    That said, your Internet connection can affect your boot times - again, depending on what you have loading at boot. Even the number of shortcuts on your Desktop affect boot times.

    My 3.4 i7 8Gb, HD, W7 system takes almost 2 1/2 minutes. My older 3.08GHz XP system took over 4 minutes.

    But with both systems, I have my anti-malware (of course), CoreTemp, WinPatrol Plus, MailWasher Pro loading at boot.

    If you create image backups very frequently like almost daily image backups, that might make sense to me - otherwise, I would rather figure out what is wrong and fix that - instead of simply reimaging.

    To me, simply re-imaging (except in the case of a drive failure) is almost a cop out - essentially the same thing as format and reinstall. I don't see how you can learn first what went wrong and second, how to prevent recurrence if you reimage.

    And unless you conduct very frequent image backups, it is likely your restored image will be behind in Windows Updates, security program updates, and any other changes you made since the last backup.
     
  19. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    I'm with you on that one Dig....I can understand doing a system image from a clean install, then another one after all drivers/software is installed....for that in-case of emergency need should arise to use it. But holy crap they eat up so much HDD space. My last one was 80 gigs and then the whole damn system image was 100 gigs, damn near took up 25% of my 1TB storage drive.
     
  20. mikezilla2

    mikezilla2 Senior Member

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    Item(s) Subtotal: $649.99Shipping & Handling: $10.98

    will have to wait and see i guess


    appractie the help in choosing guys , if they turn around and say no we wont ship it guess il just go with a 250
     

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