Windows 10 Windows Boot Manager on wrong drive

Discussion in 'Windows 10 Help and Support' started by Wilson, Aug 14, 2016.

  1. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Hi all,

    I have been trying to remove this hard drive as there are no longer any files on it. But it appears that some part of the boot process happens on this drive?

    Once I remove the drive windows fails to boot up.

    How do I move the boot manager off the I drive and on to the c drive?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks
    Wilson
     
  2. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    You would need to...
    • Shrink the partitions on C and create a SYSTEM partition
    • Copy the BCD file to the correct location on the system partition
    • Modify the boot manager entry with bcdedit partition value to be partition=C:
     
  3. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Hi,
    You're post is quite confusing but we may be able to help. :confused: You say you are trying to remove the hard drive, but you don't say WHICH drive by letter designation. Which drive and letter are you having the problem with? C:, E:, J:, K:, I:?

    Also, when asking a question like this it's customary to at least provide us with some basics. What version of Windows are you running? What Make/Model is the computer? Is it a desktop PC or a laptop? Is it an OEM PC (Dell, HP, Acer, Toshiba)? Self-built PC or Custom-built PC?

    It's hard to solve a problem you've had for weeks or months without this kind of information. :andwhat:

    If you didn't know which drive is the Bootdrive (C: drive), then who added all these extra drives to your computer? Did you buy it with all these drives from someone?

    There a number of repair tools you can use to fix this problem, but if you remove the C: drive and it doesn't boot from the other drives, this is normal as only ONE DRIVE, THE C: BOOTDRIVE is responsible for booting Windows (commonly referred to as Drive #0). If any of your other drives are USB drives, which it appears to be, none of those drives are capable of booting Windows, so of course removing the C: drive will cause your system not to boot.:noway:

    Thanks,
    <<<BIGBEARJEDI>>>
     
  4. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    >>>@neemo: Well this would be a problem if the OP removed his C: drive (Drive #0).:nerdie: A system partition alone on a secondary drive won't have Windows OS anywhere. That's why I asked him the question which drive he physically removed from the machine.<<<
    >>>BBJ<<<
     
  5. Neemobeer

    Neemobeer Windows Forum Team
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    Technically speaking is boot drive is really C and I at this point since he has the two required parts spread out.



    The bootmgr entry needs to point to have the "partition" entry point to the physical disk and volume. So it has to be setup like so if for example its the third volume on the first disk
    partition=\Device\Harddisk\Volume3 or whichever physical disk it's C is on.
     
  6. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    You can download EasyBCD it will make it easy to see what's going on, and create a boot file on the drive that you want.

    EasyBCD

    There's a free version and the bottom of the page.

    You should be able to add the Unallocated partition to Drive I:\ in disk manager.
    They are both on the same physical drive.

    You should leave the Recovery Partition on Drive 0, C:\ alone.
    Normally there would be a System Reserved partition on Drive 0.

    You can probably create one, as Nemmo has said.

    Not sure how you get the correct data on it though since this is usually created during Windows install. On my computer it's only 350 Mb.

    Mike
     
    #6 MikeHawthorne, Aug 14, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2016
  7. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Hi all Thanks for your replies,

    Sorry I didn't know what information I needed to include.

    The drive I am trying to remove is disk 1 which has the I drive in it. There is currently nothing on this drive it is all empty except I think the boot manager is on this drive?

    This is an OEM self built machine with Windows 10 installed on it. The windows folder is on the C drive.

    When I remove the I drive from this machine and then try to boot up with the C drive selected in the bios, I just get a black screen with a blinking curor.

    Thanks again everyone for your help.
    Wilson
     
  8. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Hi Mike,

    Sorry If the post was a bit confusing, I am trying to remove the I drive from the computer and boot from C drive.

    C drive has windows 10 installed on it.

    Thanks.
    Wilson
     
  9. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Hi all,

    Sorry, could someone please help me with this problem?

    I would like to remove the "I" drive from my computer.

    Thanks
    Wilson
     
  10. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Sorry could anyone help with this problem?

    Thanks.
     
  11. Saltgrass

    Saltgrass Excellent Member
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    You can open an Administrative command prompt and type the command below to place boot files in the C partition. Make sure and put spaces where indicated or copy and paste the commands.

    bcdboot c:\windows /s c:

    Then shut your system down and disconnect the other drive. During reboot, make sure drive 0 is set as the primary boot device. The system should now boot normally but you may not have recovery options available. So before you shut the system down you might run the command below in case you need the info, it should show the path to the recovery tools so save the listing.

    reagentc /info
     
  12. Wilson

    Wilson New Member

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    Thanks Saltgrass,

    It is working now, I was able to boot into windows from C drive and removed the I drive.

    Cheers
    Wilson
     

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