CPU Temperature Error

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Help and Support' started by NewfieEK, May 14, 2016.

  1. NewfieEK

    NewfieEK New Member

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    Using Windows 7 Past couple of days my computer has crashed when i rebooted it came up saying a CPU Temperature Error (Hit F1 to continue) What is the cause of this and what can i do to prevent it from happening again. If you needs more info let me know what you needs and where to find that info. Thanks

    Opps just noticed this is in Win10 forum and not 7
     
    #1 NewfieEK, May 14, 2016
    Last edited: May 14, 2016
  2. NewfieEK

    NewfieEK New Member

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    Using Windows 7 Past couple of days my computer has crashed when i rebooted it came up saying a (Hit F1 to continue) What is the cause of this and what can i do to prevent it from happening again. If you needs more info let me know what you needs and where to find that info. Thanks
     
  3. matterny

    matterny New Member

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    A crash log would be helpful. Otherwise we can only guess.
    If it is CPU temp, check to see if your CPU cooler is working. It will shutdown if it detects your CPU getting too hot, however I have only had this happen running junk CPUs without any fan or heatsink. The worst case scenario would be that your CPU has a bad sensor in it reading out outrageous temperatures.
     
  4. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Hi NewfieEK and welcome to the Forum :polite:

    It would be helpful if you posted hardware specs for your computer as well. Make/Model please? Also, is it a Desktop PC or a Laptop?
    If it's a Desktop PC, is it an OEM brand (Dell, Acer/Gateway, HP, Toshiba), or a self-built PC? If you are not sure how to do this, please go to www.piriform.com and download the free SPECCY diagnostic and upload the text result file back here to this thread for further analysis.

    Post back if you'd like some basic instructions on how to test your hardware and your computer specs.

    Lastly, if you have a self-built rig (we call this a Custom-Build PC), please post Make/Model and Wattage of your Power Supply too (PSU).

    P.S. I get this same problem on my Desktop PC (Dell Studio540) every 2 weeks or so right after the Tuesday weekly Push update comes in from Microsoft. I haven't been able to figure this out on my System yet, and it's been happening since about January 2016, but I'm fairly convinced it will be a complete Windows reinstall to fix it.:waah: That may not be the case in your situation however. We may be able to fix it once we know your hardware specs :worship:.

    Best of luck, :encouragement:
    <<<BIGBEARJEDI>>> :usa:
     
  5. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Threads merged to save confusion.
     
  6. MikeHawthorne

    MikeHawthorne Essential Member
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    Hi

    Not sure that he's coming back but...

    Something that might help is Cupid temperature monitor, it will let you see what the temp in your computer is doing it's a free download.

    HWMONITOR | Softwares | CPUID

    It will show what fans are running and how fast etc.

    As the previous posters have said the more info we have about your computer the easier it is to figure out what's going on.

    You don't want to have this keep happening it could damage your computer.

    Mike
     
    #6 MikeHawthorne, May 14, 2016
    Last edited: May 16, 2016
  7. William B

    William B Active Member

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    That is a good recommendation I use HWMonitor/CPUZ/GPUZ at all times. HWMonitor is especially nice to see the temperatures and most of the voltages too in one glance.
     
  8. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    Everyone has there personal favourite although I prefer HWiNFO64. It's a little like HWMonitor in that one can see temps, voltages and much more..

    What is your machine like in terms of dust? If it's extremely dusty or you've never cleaned it out then it's possible it's overheating. Use the apps that have been suggested to determine your current temps when running at idle and at full load.
     
  9. NewfieEK

    NewfieEK New Member

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    It's a self built Desktop PC not sure where to find my Make/Model and Wattage of your Power Supply .

    This is the Copy & Paste frim the results after i Downloaded and ran the SPECCY diagnostic

    Operating System
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
    CPU
    Intel Core 2 Quad Q8200 @ 2.33GHz 97 °C
    Yorkfield 45nm Technology
    RAM
    4.00GB Dual-Channel DDR2 @ 399MHz (5-5-5-18)
    Motherboard
    ASUSTeK Computer INC. P5Q (LGA 775) 33 °C
    Graphics
    E2242 (1920x1080@60Hz)
    1024MB ATI AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series (XFX Pine Group) 47 °C
    Storage
    465GB Western Digital WDC WD5000AAKX-083CA1 ATA Device (SATA) 43 °C
    Optical Drives
    HL-DT-ST BDDVDRW GBC-H20L ATA Device
    HL-DT-ST DVD-RAM GH22NS30 ATA Device
    Audio
    AMD High Definition Audio Device


    IF more is needed or Where i have to look to get it please let me know
     
  10. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    That's way too hot. Are you running a stock cooling solution or in other words the cooler that came with the chip? If so you need to buy a third party solution.
    This cooler is both cheap and very good at what it does:
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo CPU Cooler

    The maximum temp Intel advise to not go beyond is 74c at the IHC:
    Intel® Core™2 Quad Processor Q8200 (4M Cache, 2.33 GHz, 1333 MHz FSB) Specifications

    The PSU info should be (if your lucky) written on the side of the actual PSU. The reason I say lucky is that sometimes the info label is on the side you can't see. Sometimes taking the back panel off helps but you'll have to see.
     
    #10 kemical, May 15, 2016
    Last edited: May 15, 2016
  11. NewfieEK

    NewfieEK New Member

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    Only what came with the PC when i first got it. Only just got this issue recently. I just re-ran that thing again and a Temp for the CPU is no longer showing. I might call a local repair shop and see about getting something done
     
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  12. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Hi again NewfieEK,
    Thanks very much for posting back your hardware specs from SPECCY, AND letting us know you have a self-built or custom-built PC! Nice job on that. That helps tremendously!:D Notice we had some of our "Big Guns" jump in to help you (Mike Hawthorne & kemical). Their thoughts on using various diagnostics to check your temps were on target and are invariably suggested to folks who built their own PCs.;) Just about all experienced PC builders who fabricate their own PCs from parts use one or all of the above suggested diagnostics to monitor their CPU, Motherboard, GPU card, and Hard Drive temps and voltages, along with fan speeds. This is especially important if you are overclocking your CPU, RAM, or your GPU card!!:cool:

    As you can see, we've already uncovered a potential hardware fault with your system, and that is that extremely high temp of 97 deg. C on your CPU chip. :eek:Are you doing overclocking in your BIOS? If so, if your PSU is undersized, that can contribute to excess heat on the CPU cores, which in turn can cause lots and lots of problems with your Motheboards and all other connected peripherals. :ohno: Voltages that are low powering your various internal devices such as your GPU card and Hard Drive(s) can adversely affect their performance as mentioned above too.:(
    The very next thing we need for you to do is to please check that PSU!!

    We know that you've been inside your computer case before, since you assembled your own PC, so opening your case up and examining the side of your PSU for a lable with the specs and wattage shouldn't be to difficult for you. Often, as kemical astutely indicated, the PSU label isn't facing where you can read it, and therefore you must disconnect the AC power cord from the back of the PSU if you haven't already done so, and remove the PSU entirely from the case in order to read the label on it for the needed specs. I've included a helpful YouTube video to assist you with this task here:
    how to find your psu wattage in a pc video? - Bing video

    The above video will be mostly a refresher for you, but clearly explains and shows you how to remove your PSU from your computer case and it's only about 5 min. long. Please find the Make/Model of that PSU and the Wattage shown on the lable, and post back here. We will attempt to do an analysis for you and tell you whether that PSU is adequate for your System hardware or not. We'll be able to do this quickly, so if I don't answer you right away, one of the other guys will jump in and tell you if ok or not. We all have built PCs for many many years and can do this quickly.

    As in POST #10, kemical mentions using a CPU cooler, which can help with the temps some, but if you are overclocking your CPU or attempting to overclock your GPU card, this may be insufficient even with multiple case and Motherboard fans!! :eek: Low voltage rails
    (+/-12Vdc, +/-5Vdc) can wreak havoc with your CPU chip, GPU card, and the Motherboard itself including permanent damage.:( After we get your PSU specs and do an analysis on your system, we may ask you to turn off all Overclocking for all devices in your PC. Then you will need to have downloaded the CPUID and HWiNFO64 diagnostics that MikeH and kemical suggested and be running those after you disable your Overclocking, and we'll see if the Temps improve, and specifically they must drop below the 74 deg C mark. If they don't at that point, most likely this is from an Underpowered PSU, or even a faulty PSU.:waah: If the CPU temp still exceeds the 74 deg C mark after the Overclocking has been disabled on all components, there is a good chance that it needs to be replaced with a larger Wattage unit (preferably Gold rated or better).:waah:


    We'll await your PSU specs and can adise you further. But you can see where this is heading I believe.

    Best,:encouragement:

    BBJ
     
    #12 BIGBEARJEDI, May 15, 2016
    Last edited: May 15, 2016
  13. RichM

    RichM Active Member

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    Before we all jump to conclusions, I would have someone look at the board and make sure one of the clamps didn't come loose, perhaps get an in home service or take to a shop because either that and/or the cpu grease is non existant which is easy enough on an older pc and needs replacement. That is common with those stock Intel Hsfs and the only way to really tell is remove the board and look at the bottom, but one thing I wouldn't do is run this pc any longer because those temps are high enough to blow away the cpu.
     
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  14. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
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    The PSU does not directly supply power, in terms of voltage regulation, to the CPU, but it does supply power to other modular components connected to the motherboard such as the GPU rails and SATA drives. A component can not reasonably be damaged from being undervolted. Several things in an under-voltage scenario would happen here:

    1. If the PSU supplies a lack of power to the motherboard, which regulates the voltage for the CPU (and in many cases the CPU is also self-regulating its own voltage), the system will blue screen, fail to start, go into endless reboot cycles, and show other signs of problems.

    2. If the PSU supplies a lack of power to the video graphics card or the SATA drives these devices will fail to operate properly, but under no circumstances would they overheat.

    A lack of proper voltage does not create an overheating scenario. If there is not enough power it will just malfunction and turn off. The only scenario where you can create physical damage this way is from going over the voltage or the PSU/CPU/motherboard/and other components losing their capability to regulate the voltage.

    If a CPU is undervolted it will hang it will not damage the processor or any other components. Constantly restarting the system over and over again in a boot loop could damage components, but this would have to go on for days. If anything the PSU can overheat from undervolting the other components in extreme circumstances.

    My suggestion is that the CPU is overheating not being under too low of a voltage.
     
    #14 Mike, May 15, 2016
    Last edited: May 15, 2016
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  15. kemical

    kemical Windows Forum Admin
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    I gotta admit I've never heard of or seen a component overheating due to lack of voltage. A classic sign of low voltage is blue screens, shutdowns and freezing.
    Check the cooler isn't full of dust or as Rich say's hasn't come loose.
     
    Mike likes this.
  16. Mike

    Mike Windows Forum Admin
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    Don't even use this system. Check the fan, the CPU thermal paste, and reseat the CPU. If you do not know how to do this, or are not technically savvy, you should send this system off for repair immediately. Anything over 71C for this processor approaches the TJMAX or the MELTING POINT of the processor cores. You need to stop using this computer and get it fixed right away.
     
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  17. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    @RichM: Good idea!:lightbulb: While the OP has got the case open to remove the PSU, he can look at the Motherboard itself around the CPU chip area and do a visual check for burn marks. If the OP built his PC, he could also REMOVE the Motherboard from the case and examine the bottom side or reverse side of the board underneath the CPU chip and do a visual check for burn marks or scorching there as well. <<<BBJ>>>

    Hi again NewfieEK:
    From your POST #11 just a bit ago, you say that you got the PC with the PSU already installed in the Case tower??:blink: If so, did you install the rest of the components then yourself, such as the Motherboard, CPU chip, GPU card, RAM memory sticks, additional fans?:question: If you did not, and you purchased the computer already pre-built; this does not classify as a SELF-BUILT PC, but rather a CUSTOM-BUILT PC that you bought off the shelf from someone or at a computer shop, or you paid someone else to assemble the components for you to your specifications. Please clarify further!
    If you are unable to remove the PSU to get at the specs label because you've never done it before, that would lead us to believe you have a CUSTOM-BUILT PC. And that's Ok; we just are trying to glean what the situation is with your actual hardware in front of you. If you are unable or unwilling to remove that PSU, there is not much we can do to further help you. And your comment about taking your computer to a local repair shop is probably going to be in your near future. This also tells us that you might not be able or willing to open up your computer case and remove the PSU.

    You might consider taking your computer back to the person who built this PC for you or to the store or shop where you purchased it. Even if you don't have a Warranty on the PC or if you did and it's expired, it would be a very good idea for you to take it back to where you got it, as they would be able to test it thoroughly for you, and inspect the Motherboard and other components for you since they built it and should be familiar with all the components inside it. You may also mention that you experienced intermittent high CPU temps, and have them look for that as well. That's sometimes a sign of permanent damage to the Motherboard electronics, other times it could be a loose wire or frayed connection in one of the Molex connectors from the PSU that attaches to the Motherboard. The Tech can determine this via physical removal of the PSU and testing on a Multimeter. A good Tech will jiggle the wire harness and connectors while testing with the Meter to see if this is the case. Sometimes, rarely, the Connector Sockets get bent or broken on the Motherboard, and if that's the case, that is usually not fixable and the Motherboard must be replaced! The important thing is to power-cycle your computer again a couple of times and check to see if the CPU temp exceeds the Max again and then drops below the 74 deg C threshold again. If it does this more than once, it's a good indicator of a loose or frayed PSU-to-Motherboard cable, or the rare broken Socket Connector (Molex) on the Motherboard (rare).

    Let know what you find and decided to do.:)

    BBJ :wink: :brew:
     
  18. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Thanks, Mike! I wish I had put it so succinctly! :hee:
     
  19. RichM

    RichM Active Member

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    My point exactly overheating wouldn't be the result of low voltage, time to have hsf and cpu checked by someone who can rep[lace the grease and the hsf if necessary and you should stop using it.
     
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  20. NewfieEK

    NewfieEK New Member

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    Hey guys, sorry for the delay. Yes sorry for the misunderstanding this was a CUSTOM-BUILT PC that i got at a shop several years back. I got the tower all unhooked to take to the shop tomorrow. Thanks for the help and the info that you guys were giving me and explaining it out. Not being that knowledgeable on this this. I did have someone pop the side off to look i think they said it was 450W if thats what you were looking for.
    I May take my laptop in with me and show them this post so they can have an better idea of what was happening. I will update you when repairs done. Thanks again :)
     

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