IDE HDD master not found press F1 error after replacing HDD with SDD

ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#21
Yes with two provisos;

1. Don't have any ide harddrive connected at the time of install or windows will try to default to them instead of your ssd… just plug them back in after the install is finished and everything should run smoothly.

2. You have a 64bit chipset… I strongly advise installing a windows 7 64 bit operating system… a 32 bit will install but will run at reduced performance.
 


#23
Yes with two provisos;

1. Don't have any ide harddrive connected at the time of install or windows will try to default to them instead of your ssd… just plug them back in after the install is finished and everything should run smoothly.

2. You have a 64bit chipset… I strongly advise installing a windows 7 64 bit operating system… a 32 bit will install but will run at reduced performance.
On point 1. I found out the hardway.....MBR was on IDE drive and OS was on SATA drive (error message on boot "no OS found")....long story, but lesson learned for sure. It's exactly how I do it now and continue to use my PATA drive just for my backups...
 


#24
You always set the Windows 7 first into AHCI and then the BIOS.

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/61869-ahci-enable-windows-7-vista.html
Isn't this method for a OS that is all ready installed/inplace. For a SSD requiring AHCI on a clean install I just change it in the BIOS first and then install the OS, all ways works for me.
 


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whs

Extraordinary Member
#25
Isn't this method for a OS that is all ready installed. For a SSD requiring AHCI on a clean install I just change it in the BIOS first and then install the OS, all ways works for me.
You are probably right. I never tried it that way. I rarely reinstall. When I get the SSDs, I usually restore the running system from the HDD
 


#26
I've never tried it your way with a OS in place. On a personal note; with a new HDD/SSD I all ways preform a clean install...but that's just me.
 


whs

Extraordinary Member
#27
I know, your way is better. But I am lazy and don't like to spend 3 days setting it all up again. Next time when I get a new PC I will try it at the very beginning. Then there is nothing lost. Now that SSDs have become so cheap ($110 for 240GB), it's worth having those on hand.
 


#28
Is it a 'no-brainer' to use Windows 7 64 bit?

ie there are no issues with things like printers, mice, usb sticks that are a year or two old that will not work because they did not come with 64k windows 7 device drivers?
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#29
The printer is the only maybe... Windows 7 64bit has been around much more than two years & drivers are not all that hard to find unless we are talking a dot-matrix printer?
 


#30
Its an HP A4 mono laser printer and about 12 months old.
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#31
You need the model number like P1606... but this wepsite
should have a windows 7 (64bit) driver.
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#33
So on Tuesday it was a hp (Hewlett Packard) and today it’s a Samsung… interesting printer you have there.:)

The bad: You have a low frills budget printer but the slightly elevated per-page cost for toner shouldn't be an issues with home use… consider buying extra tonner now or whenever it's on special if you plan on keeping it a long time.

The good news is Samsung knows their software and all the drivers are made to support both 32 and 64 bit processers.

This website is where you get Samsung basic drivers & install software from… http://www.samsung.com/au/support/model/ML-2165W/XSA-downloads

printer.png


p.s. always go to the manufactures' page first for drivers!
 


#34
Ah yes its a Samsung.

Looks like the same driver supports both 32 and 64 bit windows 7

Yes its a bit low budget - around £50 and hopefully the toner cartiridges can be bought cheaply online
- but the idea was to get away from photo printers - as I don't print photos much and it has been costing a small
fortune, in colour cartridges, to print black and white documents!

I probably will not be looking at a windows 7 purchase for a week or two. Did read that you can run SSD's
in a Raid 0 configuration - but there are problems with recovery due to files being split over two disks - does
this mean that the Windows checkpoint recovery system is yet to catchup with such arrangements?
 


#35
Re: The error message you are seeing has nothing to do with the SATA controller being set to AHCI or IDE . The IDE drive you removed was set to master and the CD drive was set to slave.

I'm going to move to Windows 7 but thought I'd try out moving the jumper on the back of the CD - as per the screenshot I moved the jumper from the middle to the right hand side (B in the diagram) to make the cd master (the ide cable plugged in is also marked master) - on power-up I still get the same F1 IDD HDD master not found message and the cd works!

upload_2014-4-26_22-51-17.png
 


Attachments

#36
As there is only one device plugged in on the ide cable - the cd - it looks like the
CPU does look at jumper settings as there are possible contentions.
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#37
I probably will not be looking at a windows 7 purchase for a week or two. Did read that you can run SSD's
in a Raid 0 configuration - but there are problems with recovery due to files being split over two disks - does
this mean that the Windows checkpoint recovery system is yet to catchup with such arrangements?
Stop right there!

I'm sorry but there is no point putting an ssd into raid 0 because "someone said…"

The point of having a raid 0 setup was to (marginally) speed up read times across multiple drives… it was dangerous to use because the drives are not designed to be handled this way and also because if one of the drives fails then you will not only lose that data but whatever is stored on all the others as well.

It is not a case of Windows didn't keep up but more that hard drives have become faster without needing to be set into raid configuration & putting an ssd into raid is just pointless because there is no moving parts to speed up so it will run at exactly the same speed as an un-raided ssd but be more prone to data loss.
 


#38
ok so not a great idea then!
 


#39
Re: Windows 7 - I am only replacing the OS on a desktop PC with no touch screen so is it best to go for Windows 7 or is there an arguement for buying Windows 8 and running it in desktop mode because it maybe faster or something else?
 


ussnorway

Windows Forum Team
Staff member
Premium Supporter
#40
Windows 8 is better than win 7 in every measurable way but your laptop is old and not going to manage it.

What are the stats on the desktop pc?

p.s. you can look at the available drivers for your laptop by going to this website.

edit: Opps somehow my tired old brain decided the other system was a laptop instead of a desktop, sorry for any confusions… my bad.
 


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