Windows Error 0xc0000005

NarWhat

New Member
Hi guys, I have a PC that's being a little glitchy. So far in some applications I get the error code 0xc0000005. I can't seem to find the dump file though. I've tried searching by filetype, manually looking through all of the Windows sub-folders, but I can't find the minidumps. The first step to finding the problem is finding where the heck the darn dump files are. Then I need to find out what is wrong w/ the system itself, using the dump files. I've run MemTest86+, but it didn't find anything wrong w/ my RAM. My PC specs are correct, so I hope you can help me. The only modding I've ever done is overclocking my CPU to 3.15GHz. Besides that, I can't think of anything else that is messed with/modded.

Thanks in advance,
NarWhat
 


Pauli

Extraordinary Member
Premium Supporter
The first thing to do, in my opinion, would be to set the BIOS to default, even perhaps by taking out the CMOS battery, that being the most secure method. "Overclocking may damage your computer and components" - that's the universal rule.

Not the perfect solution, I know, but one has to start somewhere.
 


NarWhat

New Member
The first thing to do, in my opinion, would be to set the BIOS to default, even perhaps by taking out the CMOS battery, that being the most secure method. "Overclocking may damage your computer and components" - that's the universal rule.Not the perfect solution, I know, but one has to start somewhere.
Yeah I'll try resetting the BIOS. I'm starting to wonder if it has something to do with my registry. Is there any way to completely rebuild the registry? (well without a full system restore).Thanks for replying,NarWhat
 


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Pauli

Extraordinary Member
Premium Supporter
The only way to completely rebuild the registry is, as far as I know, to re-install Windows from the bottom. A program most commonly recommended to work with the registry is CCleaner, CCleaner - PC Optimization and Cleaning - Free Download

Personally, I've used for many years and continue using Free Window Registry Repair, Free Window Registry Repair: a windows registry repair freeware.. I think it's done a good work.

Both above mentioned may solve issues, but it's not certain. Anyways, I've lived this far!

Best wishes. :)
 


NarWhat

New Member
The only way to completely rebuild the registry is, as far as I know, to re-install Windows from the bottom. A program most commonly recommended to work with the registry is CCleaner, CCleaner - PC Optimization and Cleaning - Free Download

Personally, I've used for many years and continue using Free Window Registry Repair, Free Window Registry Repair: a windows registry repair freeware.. I think it's done a good work.

Both above mentioned may solve issues, but it's not certain. Anyways, I've lived this far!

Best wishes. :)
Thanks ^.^ I'm running CCleaner right now, like all the tabs XD
 


MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
Hi

Since you are still running Windows 7 you can do a Repair Installation.
Can't do that in 8.

It will restore Windows without forcing you to reinstall everything else again.

Repair Install - Windows 7 Help Forums

If you don't have a disk with Service Pack 1 on it you should download and burn an .iso file for the same version of Windows that you have that has service pack one on it.

Burn a CD or DVD from an ISO file

Official Windows 7 SP1 ISO Image Downloads

Mike
 


NarWhat

New Member
HiSince you are still running Windows 7 you can do a Repair Installation.Can't do that in 8.It will restore Windows without forcing you to reinstall everything else again.Repair Install - Windows 7 Help ForumsIf you don't have a disk with Service Pack 1 on it you should download and burn an .iso file for the same version of Windows that you have that has service pack one on it.Burn a CD or DVD from an ISO fileOfficial Windows 7 SP1 ISO Image DownloadsMike
One question before I perform a repair install: will reinstalling Windows also remove all my programs? Because I have a LOT of recording / editing using Sony Vegas and recording with DxTory.
 


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MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
Hi

Doing a repair install the way it's described in the link will not delete any data from your computer.

It's possible that some software may need to be reinstalled even though the installations are still in place, because the associated registry entries are missing.

I've done it many times on a number of computers with no problems, and usually most of the software will still run fine.

I think that some software just rewrites the registry entries the first time you run it.

You will probably have to renew all the links by going to the .exe files and making an icon for the desktop.

You will end up with what looks like a fresh install of Windows, the default desktop etc.
You'll have to redo all your Windows settings over again.

The whole process should only take about a half hour or so.

If you have an external drive, or a second hard drive, I'd still make sure I have any data backed up. Images, music files, video clips, text files whatever you can't replace.

I never have my data on my Windows drive.

If you need to you could partition the Windows drive using disk manager and make a partition to back your data to, but the best bet would be an external drive.
They are pretty cheap insurance, I never have only one copy of anything important.

It's better to be safe than sorry as the old saying goes.

Mike
 


NarWhat

New Member
HiDoing a repair install the way it's described in the link will not delete any data from your computer.It's possible that some software may need to be reinstalled even though the installations are still in place, because the associated registry entries are missing.I've done it many times on a number of computers with no problems, and usually most of the software will still run fine.I think that some software just rewrites the registry entries the first time you run it.You will probably have to renew all the links by going to the .exe files and making an icon for the desktop.You will end up with what looks like a fresh install of Windows, the default desktop etc.You'll have to redo all your Windows settings over again.The whole process should only take about a half hour or so.If you have an external drive, or a second hard drive, I'd still make sure I have any data backed up. Images, music files, video clips, text files whatever you can't replace.I never have my data on my Windows drive.If you need to you could partition the Windows drive using disk manager and make a partition to back your data to, but the best bet would be an external drive.They are pretty cheap insurance, I never have only one copy of anything important.It's better to be safe than sorry as the old saying goes.Mike
Okay thank you! I currently have my HDD partitioned 4 ways->Partition 1- Windows 7 (NTFS)>Partition 2- Personal Data (FAT32)>Partition 3- Recorded Videos (FAT32)>Partition 4- Ubuntu 13.04 (ext4)So there's no need for backing up my data :) But I'll still do it... you never know if something could go terribly wrong and there's a nuclear winter. Lol.
 


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MikeHawthorne

Essential Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
Good Luck.

I don't do this anymore with the later versions of Windows, but through XP I used to create a new user ID.

Then I would boot in as the new user, start the reinstall from within Windows using the new User profile and installing it on my second drive, forcing Windows to do a complete new installation while leaving my old one intact, and picking up nothing from the old one.

Then once I had everything configured, I would remove the old one from the boot menu and delete it.

That way I never lost anything or had to worry about the install going bad.

I could alway boot into the old install and retrieve things until I was sure that I had gotten all my mail lists, etc.

Mike
 


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