Adding a second seprate network in my home.

#1
Ok, My brain if fried... I am trying to set up another seprate network in my basement. I can't for the life of me figure out how to set up this thing to get it to do what I want... I ran a cable down from the existing router to the basement. On router 1 it is plugged into a LAN port and also a LAN port on router 2. This is giving me wired connectivity but no wireless.

Can someone Please tell me how to set up a completly new network that connects to the internet through the existing router?
 


patcooke

Microsoft MVP
Staff member
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Microsoft MVP
#2
The second router needs to be told where to send its internet traffic. You can do this by setting the gateway address for the second router to the internal address of the first router. This will direct all traffic from devices connected to the second router to the first one which will in turn direct it to your ISP connection.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#3
If you want to be entertained while you learn, you can check the link. Then go to the Videos tab and on the bottom there is a Cascading Routers video. This is for a specific brand of router, but the steps should be similar with other types.

http://support.linksys.com/en-us/support/routers/E3000
 


#4
That was a good video Saltgrass but I wanted to know if there was a way to make a whole new network. Here I have to use the same SSID and my home network. I want a stand alone access point for a work type of network. My home network is MAC filtered and for the new one I just want it password protected.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#5
Pat knows much more about networking than I, but it sounds like you need to do a LAN to WAN. You can check the lower part of the page on the link. The drawback is one part of the network will not be able to communicate with the other part. And I do not think you have to use a 192. address for the second network, you might be able to use something like 10.0.0.1

Maybe Pat will know for sure.

http://kb.linksys.com/Linksys/GetArticle.aspx?docid=785463d9ecaf4cac84aed245b08d615f_3733.xml&pid=80
 


patcooke

Microsoft MVP
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Microsoft MVP
#6
You could use a 192 and a 10 but probably more consistent to just use two different 192.168.x.y subnets as x can be anything from 0 to 254 (giving 255 different networks) with y being any value 1 to 254giving 254 devices on each network. So make 192.168.1.y and 192.168.2.y making sure to change the address of the router(s) itself to be compatible.
 


#7
Would it be easier to connect a switch to the cable modem then use that to make 2 separate networks? I would still have to use the 2 different network address (ie. 192.168.2.x and 192.168.1.y) or am I totally off?
 


badrobot

Senior Member
#8
Ok, My brain if fried... I am trying to set up another seprate network in my basement. I can't for the life of me figure out how to set up this thing to get it to do what I want... I ran a cable down from the existing router to the basement. On router 1 it is plugged into a LAN port and also a LAN port on router 2. This is giving me wired connectivity but no wireless.

Can someone Please tell me how to set up a completly new network that connects to the internet through the existing router?
You are actually trying to create an access point. On router 1, assign a static IP for router 2 (use a number closer to the end of the range like 192.168.1.250, etc.) On router 2, you need to login (using the static IP that you assigned to router 2 ex. 192.168.1.250) to enable "Access Point" mode (if applicable) and disable DHCP. Only router 1 should be the only one assigning IP addresses. While logged in to router 2, you can set it up as a separate network and assign a new SSID.

I have the same setup at home but using gigabit powerline adapters to connect another router in a different room.
 


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bassfisher6522

Essential Member
#9
I think everyone is missing the OP point....He wants to create a 2nd network, that has it's own SSID and password, that can be attached physically to his existing network....eg to his ISP modem. I'm not sure if that is even possible.

My theory is; you'll need to run another LAN CAT5e line off of PC/router (1), then connect router (2) to PC (2) and set router 2 up as if it was the only router in the home. Again I'm not sure this is even possible.

I have an old Linksys N router laying around somewhere....I'll try that as an experiment and see what I come up with tomorrow.
 


badrobot

Senior Member
#10
I think everyone is missing the OP point....He wants to create a 2nd network, that has it's own SSID and password, that can be attached physically to his existing network....eg to his ISP modem. I'm not sure if that is even possible.

My theory is; you'll need to run another LAN CAT5e line off of PC/router (1), then connect router (2) to PC (2) and set router 2 up as if it was the only router in the home. Again I'm not sure this is even possible.

I have an old Linksys N router laying around somewhere....I'll try that as an experiment and see what I come up with tomorrow.
The OP got the right set up. LAN port from router 1 to a LAN port on router 2. But there are some settings that needs to done before that setup will work as I explained on my post above.
 


#11
That is how I tried it first off. I plugged in an ethernet cable into the internet port from router 1. Disabled DHCP on router 2 and changed router 2's IP to 192.168.1.2... Didn't work... That I why I am thinking a switch after the ISP modem. So I can split the internet signal coming into the house and then maybe it will work.
 


badrobot

Senior Member
#12
change the IP address to a higher number. I am sure 2 is already being used by one of your devices at home. is there an option to enable "Access Point" on router 2? And make sure "wireless" is enabled on router 2.

router.jpg
 


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#13
No 2 is currently not being used... and it is old as hell... I am thinking i may just need to break down and upgrade...
 


badrobot

Senior Member
#14
No 2 is currently not being used... and it is old as hell... I am thinking i may just need to break down and upgrade...
oh, I didn't know it's old. Well, not to worry, you can grab a new wireless N router for like $15. :)

Or upgrade your existing and make that your access point.
 


Saltgrass

Excellent Member
Microsoft Community Contributor
#15
If you are going to get a new Router, a dual band one can be set up to use different SSIDs for each band. If you could use the wireless from downstairs, you could set some computers to use one band and other computers the other band. I have done that to try to keep my systems streaming media separate from the other devices.

But the LAN to WAN connection does still seem to be what you need. That assumes the second router is wireless. I know this works, because I have done it.

You also have the option to segment your network and divide it into two or more individual networks. There are special routers that are capable of hosting more than one Gateway address at a time, which can be used for this purpose, or you can use two or more routers.
 


patcooke

Microsoft MVP
Staff member
Premium Supporter
Microsoft MVP
#16
Forget the switch - operates at layer 2 an cannot see IP addresses so can only functionwithina single network or subnetwork.
 


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