BSOD when copying large files

#1
I have been fighting for sometime getting a new build system to run stable. I seem to get BSOD a lot, and it seems to happen most often when I copy large files. I have never attempted to overclock. I have not installed very much other than MS Office and FSX, but those run fine.

OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
Other OS Description Not Available
OS Manufacturer Microsoft Corporation
System Name HOME-PC
System Manufacturer ASUS
System Model All Series
System Type x64-based PC
Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4770K CPU @ 3.50GHz, 3501 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 8 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date American Megatrends Inc. 1405, 8/19/2013
SMBIOS Version 2.7
Windows Directory C:\Windows
System Directory C:\Windows\system32
Boot Device \Device\HarddiskVolume3
Locale United States
Hardware Abstraction Layer Version = "6.1.7601.17514"
User Name HOME-PC\SEWELL
Time Zone Central Daylight Time
Installed Physical Memory (RAM) 16.0 GB
Total Physical Memory 15.9 GB
Available Physical Memory 12.8 GB
Total Virtual Memory 31.9 GB
Available Virtual Memory 28.2 GB
Page File Space 15.9 GB
Page File C:\pagefile.sys

I have two SSD installed, as well as a 2TB HD (Seagate) and an external HD for backup.

When I get the BSOD it gives me a 00x01E error code. Attaching the two dump files that I had today.

When it happens, I have trouble getting back into windows because my AMDA00 driver is wrong/bad and needs updating. So thru much trial and testing I know now that I need to update the current AMDA driver from ASUS.

BTW I have updated the BIOS and all the chipset and other drivers -- LAN, audio (realtek) and video (NVIDIA) and I am pretty confident that all that is current now.

I have also used CCleaner to clean up my registry. No errors now.

Only thing I can think of here is NORTON AV is giving me hell. I also run Microsoft Security Essentials at the same time.

I will be back with some more screenshots as you suggest in your sticky thread.
 


Attachments

#2
Sorry, tried hard to follow instructions -- but noticed I posted in the wrong forum. Can the mods move this thread over to win 7 BSOD?

Attaching files from W7F Diagnostic Tool here.
 


Attachments

#3
Here are the RAM Mon screenshots
 


Attachments

Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#4
Two BSODs, relatively close together in time, both blaming your
Intel RST driver (Intel Rapid Storage Technology) iaStorF.sys 6/27/2013
It's possible, that particular driver has been known to, for whatever reason, become corrupt and may require that you download a new version from here https://downloadcenter.intel.com/Default.aspx and see if that provides a more stable and BSOD free environment.

My best guess is that you'll probably find that it is
BHDrvx64.sys 8/26/2013 part of (yet again) a Norton / Symantec software package. So......
If the update / repair install of the Intel Driver noted above does not result in satisfactory results then;
Norton / Symantec products can often be at issue in these types of problems. Please uninstall Norton using the programs uninstaller if available in the program’s directory otherwise use the programs and features applet in the control panel and follow that up with the Norton Removal Tool. And consider using Microsoft Security Essentials as at least a temporary replacement.
 


#5
Should I download a recent Intel RST RAID driver? Or should I be looking for an AHCI driver?

I have no idea really what those things mean, please keep in mind.
 


#6
I installed an updated Intel RST RAID Driver, and when prompted agreed to restart my system.

https://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&ProdId=2101&DwnldID=23060&ProductFamily=Software Products&ProductLine=Chipset Software&ProductProduct=Intel® Rapid Storage Technology (Intel® RST)&lang=eng

This resulted in another BSOD. See new dumpfiles.zip attached.

But then windows started normally, and did not prompt me to go do safe-mode, which was odd. And what is more, I did not find messed up AMDA00 drivers like I had been finding before.

I removed MSE and kept Norton. Will try that for now.
 


Attachments

Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#7
You may want to try using the Driver Update Utility from here http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/detect?iid=dc_iduu
See if that will work.
Something is going on with Intel's site right now as I cannot use their Download Center to drill down to the specific driver you need for Windows 7 64 bit.
Maybe go with uninstalling Norton and running the Norton Removal Tool and Installing Microsoft Security Essentials and see if that does the trick, you may not need the driver update.
 


#8
Why do you advise removing Norton and keeping MSE?
 


#9
I just cut/pasted about 4.76G of files from one SSD to another and it worked. That is a good sign. Let me try another batch of them, slightly bigger this time.
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#10
Code:
fffff880`03d89220  fffff880`05160dc0Unable to load image \??\C:\Program Files (x86)\Norton Internet Security\NortonData\21.0.1.3\Definitions\BASHDefs\20130903.002\BHDrvx64.sys, Win32 error 0n2
*** WARNING: Unable to verify timestamp for BHDrvx64.sys
*** ERROR: Module load completed but symbols could not be loaded for BHDrvx64.sys
BHDrvx64+0x13bdc0
May be significant or it may not be.
Seems simple enough to do the uninstall and removal and test. What does it cost you, some time is all.
As I said earlier, Symantec (Norton), McAfee, AVG, Avast and assorted others have been noted as potential culprits in similar problems.
You do what you want, it's your machine. I just pass along information
 


#11
Could that be a result of having both MSE and Norton running at the same time?

Also I just cut/pasted about 12.6 G if files so something seems to have improved here. All I did was remove MSE and update that Intel RST RAID driver (causing the BSOD).

I did try the Intel driver utility and it said my drivers were valid. Didn't say they were the most recent or anything but that they were OK.
 


Trouble

Noob Whisperer
#12
Good news is good news. I personally never look a gift horse in the mouth.

And yes, as a general rule of thumb you shouldn't run two AV products simultaneously. You could see any of many manifestation of peculiar behavior.
 


#13
Code:
fffff880`03d89220  fffff880`05160dc0Unable to load image \??\C:\Program Files (x86)\Norton Internet Security\NortonData\21.0.1.3\Definitions\BASHDefs\20130903.002\BHDrvx64.sys, Win32 error 0n2
*** WARNING: Unable to verify timestamp for BHDrvx64.sys
*** ERROR: Module load completed but symbols could not be loaded for BHDrvx64.sys
BHDrvx64+0x13bdc0
May be significant or it may not be.
Seems simple enough to do the uninstall and removal and test. What does it cost you, some time is all.
As I said earlier, Symantec (Norton), McAfee, AVG, Avast and assorted others have been noted as potential culprits in similar problems.
You do what you want, it's your machine. I just pass along information
And I appreciate it.

Norton is going to be the next suspect at this point if I have another BSOD. I got no issues installing/removing either one.
 


BIGBEARJEDI

Fantastic Member
Premium Supporter
#14
Hi Mark: Just finished reading your thread. Absolutely do NOT run Norton & MSE at the same time on the same Windows Computer! The Norton guys treat your MSE as a Virus and block many portions of it's executable code! MSE sees any Norton AV product such as Norton Internet Security, 360, etc. as a Virus and block many portions of it's executable code from operating as well. They don't get along very well. :noise:Think of Bill Gates and Steve Jobs (back in the day) in the same room at the same time!

If you continue to have problems, I would pull out your SSD as your Boot Drive and put in that external hard drive you use for backup and install your Windows7 on it. (or similar hdd drive). Test and see if the problem abates. I'm an old school guy, and SSD's are still not reliable technology IMO. There are varying opinions on this forum and others where I mention it, and it's up for discussion. However, every desktop or laptop computer that comes into me with SSD and is less than 3 years old has been found to have a bad SSD drive. In one case, it was actually a faulty Mobo. If my little test resolves the problem, then you'll have to give up some performance speed for reliability and the ability to transfer large files. BTW, 12.5GB is no longer a large file, especially when you are imaging disks of 250GB or larger. You can transfer files of 250GB or larger easily on traditional hard drive technology, albeit slower than SSD, but it works!

BIGBEARJEDI
 


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