Moving from HDD to SSD, from 32bit to 64bit

Discussion in 'Windows 7 Hardware' started by MadChanson, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. MadChanson

    MadChanson New Member

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    Hi Guys,

    I wanted to ask help on how should i go about changing from an hdd to an ssd as my system drive. I just learned that ssd's performs faster and better and i think i'd like to experience that.

    My PC right now consists of MSI PH67S-C43 mobo, 1TB HDD, Intel i3-2100, 4GB ram, 1GB AMD Radeon HD 6670 and what I like to do is use an SSD as my primary drive and use the HDD for storage and such, is that even possible?

    And since I'll be using SSD i think it's logical to use Windows 7 64bit instead of 32bit to be able to use more than 4GB ram. I checked on the Crucial system scanner and it said that my mobo is compatible upto 32GB ram. Should I max it to 32GB or 16GB would just be fine. Also, being in 64bit some programs and client games may not be compatible, is this something that I should be worried or concern about?

    Thanks for reading my noob-ish inquiries and thank you in advance for your input.


    ~MadChanson
     
  2. Josephur

    Josephur Windows Forum Admin
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    In most cases unless your doing video editing I wouldn't bother with anything over 16GB, if youir mobo takes DDR3 you can get one heck of a deal on memory now days.
    It is possible that some older programs will not work on a 64-bit system, but most programs do.

    I do not believe there is a direct upgrade path from 32 to 64-bit so you'll be starting with a fresh install.
     
  3. bassfisher6522

    bassfisher6522 Essential Member

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    Along with Josephur excellent advice, most, if not all newer SSD's have some sort of migration software to help make the transition from one drive to another.
     
  4. MadChanson

    MadChanson New Member

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    Thanks! Yes, I will be doing a fresh install.
     
  5. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    SSD is fine. I have two of them, no complaints. Work like a dream. I had doubts about going from 32 to 64 bits, but I haven't noticed any problems with programs, even some older games - they work just fine. 64 is a double highway to 32, recommendable, and most cars running on a single lane also run on a double lane, even if they only use one.

    About the memory, the more you have, the better. Any excess you can send to me! :)
     
  6. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    SSDs does not require you to have either 32 or 64 bit system. Whatever your system configuration is, SSDs will just enhance the performance of your system and optimize speed.
    Unless you do a lot of graphics or video editing on your PC, you should be ok with 16GB.
    It is recommended that before migrating to SSD, back up all your data to another hard drive and migrate only the OS on to the SSD. Doing a fresh install first is a great start. Samsung 840 series SSDs are very popular these days. And they come with easy to use migrating software.
     
  7. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Hi Mad:

    I'll have to disagree with my esteemed colleagues on this one. I do computer repairs and I've been seeing a lot of new laptops and a few desktops come in with fried SSD's. Maybe it's the crazy California weather or something, but I do not believe that is a proven mature technology and I've been advising all my clients to stay away from it. :down: Hard drive technology has been around for over 40 years now, since the 70s and is the best way to go. Yes, you do sacrifice performance, but reliability is a BIG factor for most users. SSDs are all coming back within 2 yrs. or less. Most hdd's in laptops; 3+yrs.; desktops, 5+yrs. or better. I just replaced a 120GB hdd in a Gateway desktop that finally failed after 11 years of use! :applaud:

    SSDs are the current fad, so people, especially Gamers are drawn to the slick advertising. I've had this discussion--heatedly-recently on several Tech forums besides here, and it's about 50-50.

    If you want to increase performance, you should consider purchasing a high-performance SCSI or SATA-SCSI3 type hard drive. Most hard drives you buy in computer stores today or that come with OEM built computers like dell, hp, toshiba are all 5400rpm or 7200 rpm drives. This technology is 30 years old and they give you those, cause they are cheap to build and are mass produced. However, high-performance hard drives are available at speeds up 15,000 rpm and higher like in SCSI3, with very low disk access times (read/write) and amazing transfer rates! Recent PC LAB tests have shown that high-performance SCSI3 drives approach low-end SSD on disk access times, and of course the reliability isn't even close. Those high-performance hard drives average 7+ years continuous operation; and I mean 24x7x365 operation in testing; SSDs rarely make it beyond 1 or 2 yrs. as I said.

    To further prove my point, if you can find me a Fortune500 company that is using SSD technology for their front line network servers to run their data centers and global computer networks that run their daily billion-dollar business operations, I'd like to hear who that is and I'd like to send them a letter complementing them on their extreme bravery! :bigtongue: Unless one of the Moderators here who works at Microsoft has seen that change occur there, and I have not heard that news, none of the other 499 big companies have seriously committed to this technology. The question you should be asking yourself is why not? And the answer lies in my story above--independent lab tests don't lie. Look it up yourself!

    You can take that for what it's worth.

    My 2 cents.

    BIGBEARJEDI
     
  8. Pauli

    Pauli Extraordinary Member
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    I agree with you BigBear, SSDs may become a new hype. OCZ announced in early 2012 that SSDs would vastly increase in capacity, as well as go down in price by the end of the year. Well, didn't happen.

    For standard use, even if I'm quite satisfied with mine, I don't really find extra benefits with SSDs. I don't know of one game that won't roll with HDD. SSDs are nice with OS and games, since they load faster, but since drinking a cup of coffee still takes the same time it took in medieval times... where's the true difference? Ah, the hype...

    And for storage, well, if you have the money, why not? One may also buy a space shuttle for vegetables, eh?

    Good gadget, but not yet ready for common use? Overpriced, I'd say.

    About the lifespan BigBear mentions, I don't know. By general principal, SSDs should last longer, as they have no moving parts. But, that's speculation.
     
  9. satrow

    satrow Active Member

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    Reliability has been an issue with older generations of SSDs, there are several brands that are much more reliable than others. Intel, Samsung, Crucial and, probably, Plextor I would say are the best of the bunch in that respect. Intel tends to be too expensive, the latest Plextor and Samsung Pro versions are what you should be aiming for, 256GB, if you can afford it, 128GB otherwise - the larger the capacity, the faster the write speeds; 64GB is usable but needs a lot of maintenance to keep a reasonable amount (20%?) of space free.

    Once you use an SSD, you really won't want to go back, their responsiveness is very impressive. No time to look out of the window while waiting for programs to load anymore and getting distracted from the task at hand, it could make you much more productive.

    You have a HDD to store your documents, etc. on, just ensure you also make frequent backups of all valued data, preferably on 2-3 different external devices - as you should already be doing anyway - and enjoy the upgraded ride!
     
  10. badrobot

    badrobot Senior Member

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    That is true.

    And SSDs are a matter of choice and, maybe, budget if you want to gain some improvement in PC performance. Reliability? Well, bad things happen any time to anyone even with the most expensive gadgets we buy. :)
     
    #10 badrobot, Sep 8, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2013
    Pauli likes this.
  11. BIGBEARJEDI

    BIGBEARJEDI Honorable Member
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    Agreed, BadRobot! :cool:
     

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